Football Focus 2014

Daily Archive : Saturday July 2, 2011

News

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    A commemorative torch sits at Linden Field in Much Wenlock, England, known as the birthplace of the modern Olympics. With the 2012 London Olympics just over a year away,Much Wenlock is celebrating early, and with good reason.

    Small English town stakes claim to Olympic legacy

    Much Wenlock, England, known as the birthplace of the modern Olympics. With the 2012 London Olympics just over a year away,Much Wenlock is celebrating early, and with good reason.

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    Where to catch the best music at suburban fests

    Where to catch the best live music at suburban Fourth of July fests.

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    Libertyville man charged in trade secrets theft

    A 49-year-old Libertyville man has been charged with theft of trade secrets, a felony offense that carries up to 10 years in prison. The FBI says Chunlai Yang, who writes computer code, downloaded files from his Chicago company and had sent some of the information to a Chinese agency, authorities say.

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    Wilting under the threat of a $100-a-day fine, Marilyn Webel reluctantly pulled this small air conditioner from her bedroom window to adhere to the Heritage of Huntley Homeowners Association’s new ban against window air conditioners.

    Huntley couple battles window air conditioner ban

    Whenever oppressive heat waves hit during the four summers since they bought their lovely home in Huntley, Marilyn and Richard Webel always found relief by popping a small air conditioner into one of their bedroom windows.

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    Seven vehicles were involved in a crash at Route 60 and Milwaukee Avenue in Vernon Hills around 2 p.m. Saturday. Five people were taken to the hospital.

    Seven-car crash in Vernon Hills

    Police are investigating the cause of a seven-vehicle crash Saturday afternoon near Route 60 and Milwaukee Avenue in Vernon Hills.

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    Made in America boat #43 crosses the finish line at the 18th annual Lake Ellyn Cardboard Regatta at Lake Ellyn on Saturday. As they paddled across the finish line, Jim Craig, Captain and Designer climbed up on to the seat of the Harley to wave to the crowd. The rest of the crew is Paul Heggeland, Pat Roche, Jim Owens, Mark Tucker, Kelly Brady, Bill Bickhart and Pete Felske.

    It was sink or swim — mostly sink — at Glen Ellyn cardboard boat regatta

    A giraffe, a robot, a motorcycle, a whale, several American flags and at least one “boat” took to the water Saturday afternoon in Glen Ellyn during the 18th annual Lake Ellyn Cardboard Regatta.

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    Taste of Lombard doubles as St. Baldrick’s fundraiser

    With a St. Baldrick's Foundation head-shaving tent and an Irish dance performance, the Taste of Lombard on Saturday afternoon was part barbershop, part dance recital, part carnival and, of course, part food sampling hotspot.

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    Baylee Kassel, 9, of Crystal Lake, gets way more than she bargained for during the ice cream-eating contest Saturday at the Lakeside Festival in Crystal Lake. Despite battling “brain freeze” and a stomach ache during the eight-minute competition, Baylee powered through it to take second place. For more on the festival, see Page XX.

    Lakeside carnival is kids’ delight in Crystal Lake

    Lakeside Festival in Crystal Lake attracted large crowds Saturday with all proceeds going toward restoring the historic Dole Mansion and funding Lakeside Legacy Arts Park.

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    Jonathan Kravchuk, 5, Chloe Gross, 5, and Julia Kravchuk, 5, all from Rolling Meadows, wave to floats passing during the annual Palatine Jaycees Independence Day Parade Saturday morning. For more on the festivities across the area, see Page X.

    Palatine celebrates the Fourth

    Palatine Jaycees Independence Day Parade makes its way through downtown Palatine on Saturday.

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    Megan Burke, front, makes a lap on Saturday during the Women Category 4 & 5 race of the “Tour De Villas” in Des Plaines.

    Tour De Villas comes to Des Plaines

    The second annual Des Plaines “Tour De Villas” turned some city streets into a racetrack on Saturday. The race was hosted by the American Bicycle Racing group and was held in the Villas subdivision, north of Algonquin Road and east of Wolf Road.

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    None of the 30 dogs staying overnight at the Doghouse of Barrington was hurt after a car fire early Saturday spread to the building and caused minimal damage.

    Staff, dogs OK after fire at Barrington kennel

    None of the 30 dogs staying overnight at the Doghouse of Barrington was hurt after the building caught fire early Saturday morning. The business remains open since the fire caused just minimal damage.

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    Arlington Heights man charge with drug possession

    An Arlington Heights man charged with unlawful possession of a controlled substance was in bond court Saturday.

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    Tony Danhelka and children attending the Riverwoods Family Campus during a recent summer.

    Goodbye to leader in caring for underprivileged kids

    Tony Danhelka and his wife, Donna left the St. Charles area last week to make a new home — and take advantage of the milder winters — in Fairfield Glade, Tenn. Danhelka touched many lives in the Fox Valley as one of the co-founders, along with Champ Boutwell and Paul Johannaber, of the Riverwoods Christian Center summer camp along the Fox River in St. Charles Township.

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    David Kaczynski enjoys a day out at a park near a family member’s home in Wheaton.

    Plumbing the conscience of the Unabomber’s brother

    Until he became known as the brother of the Unabomber, David Kaczynski lived a content and rather anonymous life as the assistant director of a youth shelter in Albany, N.Y., married to a woman he’d known since seventh grade.

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    Storm clouds hover over Target field Friday, delaying the baseball game between the Milwaukee Brewers and the Minnesota Twins.

    Fierce storm surprises Wisconsin campers; child killed

    A fierce thunderstorm swept through a rural Wisconsin county that was packed with holiday campers, toppling trees that killed an 11-year-old girl and injuring more than three dozen people.

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    Thousands of people march through downtown Atlanta Saturday in protest against Georgia’s strict new immigration law.

    Thousands rally against Georgia immigration law

    Thousands of marchers stormed the Georgia Capitol on Saturday to protest the state’s new immigration law, which they say creates an unwelcome environment for people of color and those in search of a better life.

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    Exxon oil spill in Montana river prompts evacuations

    An ExxonMobil pipeline that runs under the Yellowstone River near Billings in south-central Montana ruptured and dumped an unknown amount of oil into the waterway, prompting temporary evacuations along the river Saturday morning.

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    Iran: Missile progress shows futility of sanctions

    Iran’s defense minister claimed Saturday that the country’s missile progress shows that U.N. sanctions are ineffective and won’t stop Tehran’s defense programs.

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    Kvitova beats Sharapova to win Wimbledon title

    Petra Kvitova won her first Grand Slam title Saturday by beating Maria Sharapova 6-3, 6-4 in the Wimbledon final. Kvitova was playing in her first major final, but it was three-time Grand Slam champion Sharapova that showed her nerves.

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    Route 173 planning begins

    Planning has begin for future improvements to a 9-mile stretch of Route 173 from Route 59 to Route 41 through Antioch, Old Mill Creek and Wadsworth.

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    Bill Hunter, left, of Buffalo Grove, shown talking to Michael Hoff of Lake Forest, said he was moved to tears by a memorial to World War II nurses.

    World War II Jewish vets from Buffalo Grove honored in Washington

    Milton Davis, an 85-year-old World War II veteran from Wheeling, was one of three members of Buffalo Grove Jewish War Veterans Post 89 that flew to Washington, D.C., Wednesday to be honored and to see the war memorials as a guest of Honor Flight Chicago.

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    Rep. Timothy V. Johnson, a Republican from Decatur, is a quiet man with an incredible story. His goal is to call all 300,000 households in his district. Near the Capitol, Johnson calls a constituent.

    Illinois congressman tries to call all 300,000 constituents

    Rep. Tim Johnson is a quiet man with an incredible story. His goal is to call all 300,000 households in his Illinois district. Personally. Johnson calls from the airport. He calls from the treadmill. Over 10 years, this habit has cost him a vast chunk of his life and left him with little legacy of landmark legislation. But, if nothing else, it has meant he really knows the people in his district.

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    Rising sea levels threaten coastal towns

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration warns that, outside of greater New Orleans, Hampton Roads in Virginia Beach is at the greatest risk from sea-level rise for any area its size.

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    NY park to get 3,000 flags for 9/11 anniversary

    NEW YORK — Nearly 3,000 flags bearing the names of 9/11 victims will go up in a park near ground zero for the 10th anniversary of the terrorist attacks.John Michelotti, a former engineer from Greenwich, Conn., came up with the idea. He says NYC Memorial Field will be open Sept. 8-12.Only victims’ families will have access to the new 9/11 memorial on Sept. 11.

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    Hulu, which is owned by the parent companies of ABC, NBC and Fox, is attempting to make a splash this summer by streaming three British series not before seen in the U.S., including “The Booth at the End.”

    Nextflix, Hulu cut across countries’ borders

    You may have seen the original BBC version of “The Office,” but have you seen the sketch show “A Bit of Fry & Laurie” with Hugh Laurie and Stephen Fry? Catching these British shows in the U.S. used to mean hunting down sometimes hard to find DVDs. But in digital realms, divisions between American and British TV worlds are fast dissolving.

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    A key to the city of Urbana was in the time capsule from 1976 found under a flagpole at the new Champaign Chamber of Commerce Building in Champaign, Ill. (AP Photo/The News-Gazette, Robin Scholz)

    Time capsule discovered by accident

    Jason James was looking for some electrical wiring. But he found a time capsule from 1976 at the former City Bank of Champaign.

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    Allie snuggles with North Adams Home Special Care Unit resident Mary Ellen Martin in Mendon, Ill.

    Tiny pug makes patients smile

    A gentle black pug wins hearts and soothes a downstate nursing home’s residents on a daily basis. Less than a foot tall, Allie roams the hallways with her owner, the activities director in the unit where many Alzheimer’s patients live.

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    The cost of tuition, fees and room and board at Bates College in Lewiston, Maine, tops $50,000 a year.

    Guide offers college cost comparisons

    The U.S. Department of Education's online lists track tuition costs among the top and bottom 5 percent of four-year and two-year schools. The measures include public, private and for-profit colleges and universities.

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    Rick Pontious and his wife, Nancee, plan to close their White Heath berry farm at the end of this season.

    Berry farm to close after 40 years

    Blueberry picking will continue throughout next month, followed by raspberries. But this is the last season for the Pontious Farm in downstate White Heath, where berries have been grown for over 40 years.

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    Edwin Walker, right, a professor at Millikin University and personal property appraiser, speaks to Doug Gross and Jacqueline Ames about antique china dishes during a sale in May.

    Pros try to put value to antiques

    It’s easy to get all wrapped up in antiques and then carried away by what we think they might be worth. Remember that appraisal on the PBS “Antiques Roadshow" where the guy brings in a blanket he keeps draped on the back of a chair and is told it's worth between $350,000 and $500,000?

Sports

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    United States fans cheer during the World Cup match against North Korea on Tuesday.

    Heady win for Cheney, Americans

    Once, twice, three times and then a fourth, Lauren Cheney launched a shot with her foot only to watch it go right into the hands of the North Korean goalkeeper. Finally, she used her head. And just like that, the Americans looked more like a team that could contend for a third Women’s World Cup title than the one that took a self-described “bumpy” road to Germany.

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    Mike Spellman's scorecard

    Mike Spellman breaks down Saturday's portion of BP Crosstown Cup at Wrigley Field.

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    Another 1 vs. 2 in Wimbledon men’s final

    No. 1 seed Rafal Nadal will be involved today in yet another 1-2 Wimbledon championship matchup, only it’ll be against No. 2 Novak Djokovic and they’ll switch spots in the ATP rankings a day later.

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    Abbott, Bandits deliver; Snappers subdue Cougars

    Facing her former team for the first time, pitcher Monica Abbott dominated inside the circle once again for the Chicago Bandits, leading them to a 3-1 victory over the NPF Diamonds.

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    Abby Wambach, left, celebrates after teammate Heather O’Reilly scored the opening goal during the United States’ 3-0 victory over Colombia on Saturday in World Cup play in Sinsheim, Germany.

    U.S. women salute with victory

    The U.S. women's soccer team advanced to the quarterfinals in World Cup play by shutting down Colombia 3-0 on Saturday.

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    David Ragan celebrates after winning the NASCAR Coke Zero 400 in Daytona Beach, Fla., on Saturday.

    Ragan redeems himself at Daytona with 1st win

    David Ragan earned the first Sprint Cup victory of his career Saturday night with a push from teammate Matt Kenseth that helped Ragan atone for one of the biggest gaffes of his young career.

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    Hawks fans quickly showed widely ranging reaction to the signing of winger Daniel Carcillo (13), here ending up on top of Nashville Predators in the 2008 season. Carcillo was called for goaltender interference on the play.

    Crowded roster gives Bowman options
    All of a sudden the Blackhawks have a glut of players on their roster, leaving general manager Stan Bowman with plenty of options.

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    Klitschko earns lopsided decision

    Wladimir Klitschko wanted to punish David Haye for all the trash talking he did leading up to their title fight. He settled for merely making Haye another statistic in his dominating heavyweight run.

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    Fowler, Watney share AT&T National lead

    Rickie Fowler birdied six of his opening 10 holes — and missed two other chances inside 10 feet. He wound up with a 6-under 64 on Saturday and a share of the lead with Nick Watney, who set the course record with a 62 at the AT&T National.

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    Williams, Guillen discuss team

    White Sox general manager Kenny Williams and manager Ozzie Guillen met before Saturday's game against the Cubs, but not to talk about bringing up top prospect Dayan Viciedo.

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    Fire hangs on to draw Chivas USA

    The Chicago Fire took their unbeaten streak to eight MLS games with a 1-1 draw against Chivas USA in Carson, Calif., on Saturday night.

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    Pierre just happy to contribute for Sox

    The White Sox needed a big hit Saturday and Juan Pierre stepped up and answered the call for the third game in a row.

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    Cubs center fielder Marlon Byrd in the dugout during game with the White Sox at Wrigley Field on Saturday.

    Only one word for Byrd: Courage

    Courage is a relative term but Cubs' center fielder Marlon Byrd certainly demonstrated some, baseball-wise anyway, in a 1-0 loss to the White Sox on Saturday.

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    White Sox outfielders Juan Pierre, from left, Alex Rios and Brent Lillibridge celebrate after Saturday’s victory at Wrigley Field.

    Pierre delivers game winner for Sox ... again

    It's great to have no-hit stuff--- as Cubs starter Matt Garza did on Saturday afternoon --- but it's no match for the Cubs offense when it has no-run stuff. The White Sox prevailed 1-0 at Wrigley on Juan Pierre's third game-winning hit in as many days.

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    White Sox starter Philip Humber improved to 8-4 and lowered his ERA to 2.69 with Saturday’s 1-0 victory over the Cubs at Wrigley Field.

    Sox’ Humber just could be an all-star

    Another strong start from White Sox right-hander Phil Humber Saturday against the Cubs should seal an invitation to the All-Star Game.

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    Keys to understanding NBA, NFL lockouts

    One key to the ongoing NFL and NBA lockouts is understanding the differences between the two.

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    George LeClaire/gleclaire@dailyherald.com Cubs starter Matt Garza saw both his record and his ERA fall with Saturday’s 1-0 complete-game loss to the White Sox

    Garza tough-luck loser for Cubs

    The Cubs wasted a wonderful pitching performance by starter Matt Garza, who turned in the first complete game for the team this year. For his effort, all Garza got Saturday was a 1-0 loss to the White Sox before 42,165 at Wrigley Field.

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    Cubs manager Mike Quade continues to argue after being by second-base umpire Paul Emmel in the second inning Saturday.

    Cubs manager says third ejection is enough

    Cubs manager Mike Quade earned his third ejection of the year in the second inning of Saturday’s 1-0 loss to the White Sox at Wrigley Field.

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    Sox pitcher Mark Buehrle holds the BP Cup above the field before posing for a team photo with the cup just before the game with the Cubs at Wrigley Field on Saturday.

    Images: Cubs vs. Sox at Wrigley Field, game two
    The Cubs and Sox met for game 2 of their city series Saturday at Wrigley Field. The Sox beat the Cubs 1-0.

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    Chicago Cubs' Marlon Byrd, bottom, takes out Chicago White Sox second baseman Gordon Beckham after Beckham turned a double play on a ground ball hit by Alfonso Soriano during the second inning of interleague play Saturday at Wrigley Field.

    Phil Humber pitches White Sox to 1-0 win over Cubs

    Phil Humber, backed by strong defense, pitched shutout ball for seven innings and Juan Pierre singled in the only run Saturday, lifting the Chicago White Sox past the Cubs 1-0.

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    Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic celebrates defeating Russia's Maria Sharapova in the ladies' singles final at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon, Saturday, July 2, 2011. (AP Photo/Anja Niedringhaus)

    Kvitova beats Sharapova to win Wimbledon title

    Petra Kvitova beat former champion and tournament favorite Maria Sharapova in the Wimbledon final to win her first major tennis title. Kvitova defeated the Russian, 6-3, 6-4 on Centre Court at the All England Club in southwest London.

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    Kvitova wins Wimbledon title
    WIMBLEDON, England — Petra Kvitova won her first Grand Slam title Saturday by beating Maria Sharapova 6-3, 6-4 in the Wimbledon final.Kvitova was playing in her first major final, but it was three-time Grand Slam champion Sharapova that showed her nerves. The 2004 Wimbledon champion double-faulted six times, including twice to get broken to 4-2 in the first set.The 21-year-old Kvitova is the first left-handed woman to win the Wimbledon title since Martina Navratilova in 1990.

Business

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    Darren Major, left, and his husband Andrew Troup live in New York and were legally wed in Canada in 2008. As gay marriage becomes legal in New York, companies and individuals are wrestling with changes to their financial lives.

    New Yorkers ask how gay marriage will affect benefits

    New York companies and individuals are wrestling with the changing complexities of their financial realities.

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    Vatican returns to profit

    The Vatican returned to profit last year after three years in the red but donations from the faithful fell nearly $15 million, or 18 percent, amid tough economic times and the explosion of the priest sex abuse scandal.

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    Eurozone releases vital Greek aid installment

    Eurozone finance ministers say Greece will get a vital loan installment by July 15 while work continues on a second bailout for the struggling country.

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    “Clearly, purely, we want to win and block the merger,” says Spring Nextel CEO Dan Hesse of AT&T’s proposed takeover of T-Mobile USA.

    Sprint CEO launches 18-state push to stop AT&T

    Dan Hesse’s is launching an all-out war to stop AT&T Inc.’s proposed takeover of T-Mobile USA. “Clearly, purely, we want to win and block the merger,” he said. “This one poses real risks.”

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    If President Barack Obama broke new ground in 2008 using email, text messages and the Web to reach voters, Obama version 2.0 aims to take the Web campaign to the next level — harnessing the expansive roles that the Internet and social media are playing in voters’ lives.

    Obama 2012 campaign to go veyond email, text

    Call him the Digital Candidate: President Barack Obama is asking supporters to use Facebook to declare “I’m In!” for his re-election campaign and is using Twitter to personally blast out messages to his nearly 9 million followers.

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    If you like the “Angry Birds” app, you’re not alone. More than 200 million peopl ehave downloaded the game, and the CEO is thinking of making a movie.

    ‘Angry Birds’ CEO hatching movie plans

    "Angry Birds" has been downloaded more than 200 million times. Now the CEO of the Finish company that created the game wants to make a movie.

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    Coldwell Banker, a real estate sign located in St. Petersburg, Fla., using a Quick Response code, the small square with black dots and lines in the bottom half of the image, to draw business. Anyone walking or driving by can use a smartphone loaded with a QR code app to scan the box. Their phone will then take them to a Coldwell Banker website with real estate listings and agent profiles.

    Mobile apps, quick response codes help sell homes

    Some real estate brokers are now using quick response codes — or QR codes — on their “For Sale” signs and flyers. QR codes are the small square versions of a bar code that look like ink blots and they’re popping up more frequently in newspaper ads and other locations.

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    Microsoft, CEO Steve Ballmer announces the launch of Microsoft Office 365, which is designed to prevent businesses from migrating to Google.

    Microsoft fights Google with web-based office

    Microsoft Corp. is updating its online corporate software offerings to include a full Internet- based version of Office 2010 for the first time, an effort to stave off competition from Google Inc. for business accounts.

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    Facebook caught 13 percent of web surfers’ online hours in May. Google is trying to capture those hours with Google Plus.

    Google Plus increases pressure on Facebook

    Google is making a fresh attempt at social networking with a service that competes with Facebook. The service, called Google Plus, has a similar appearance as Facebook, with streaming updates of photos, messages, comments and other content from selected groups of friends.

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    PBS officials confirmed its official Twitter account that the website had been hacked. Lulz Security has stolen mountains of personal data in about a dozen different hacks, embarrassing law enforcement on both sides of the Atlantic while boasting about the stunts online.

    New brand of hackers just out for publicity

    Can you be famous if no one knows your name? A new band of hackers is giving it its best shot, trumpeting its cyber-capers in an all-sirens-flashing publicity campaign. Lulz Security has stolen mountains of personal data in a dozen different hacks, embarrassing law enforcement on both sides of the Atlantic while boasting about the stunts online.

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    The HP TouchPad is good for surfing the Web, in part because it supports Flash video content, which the iPad does not.

    Review: HP TouchPad makes a mediocre tablet

    While the HP TouchPad’s software is beautiful and intuitive, overall the tablet is more of a “meh-sterpiece” than a masterpiece, according to one reviewer.

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    Soaps, lotions, and body wash all made in Carlinville, Ill., await purchase at the Market On The Square in downtown Carlinville. The store sells only products made, grown or processed in Illinois.

    Store sells only Illinois products

    Market on the Square is the brainchild of husband and wife Nathan Payne and Aimee Arseneaux-Payne, who got tired to traveling to farmers markets to sell the produce they grow on their 2-acre Carlinville farm.

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    Brian Sherman, left, uses his laptop to record moves in his team’s fantasy football draft last August at a Buffalo Wild Wings restaurant in Cincinnati. As NFL owners and players wrestle over how to split $9.3 billion in revenue, pro football’s lockout has already cut into the widely popular, $800-million per year fantasy football industry.

    NFL lockout already hurting fantasy companies

    Although players and owners are still trying to figure out how to divide $9.3 billion in revenue and save the regular season, it’s too late for some of those who make their living from the widely popular fantasy football industry.

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    Prices for e-readers have fallen rapidly over the past year. The cheapest model of Amazon’s Kindle is now $114.

    Study: 12 percent of U.S. households own e-reader

    A study finds that 12 percent of U.S. households now own a reading device for electronic books, such as Amazon’s Kindle.That’s three times the number of households that owned an e-reader just a year ago, pointing to rapid acceptance.

Life & Entertainment

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    “Thereís no doubt about it,” David Sharpe says of his pit bull, Cheyenne. “I owe her my life.”

    Traumatized veteran finds peace in pound pup

    Eighteen veterans commit suicide every day in this country, and David Sharpe was almost one of them. Until his dog Cheyenne looked at him as he sat with the barrel of his gun out of his mouth. His love for her kept him from pulling the trigger.

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    The home's swimming pool makes for an inviting backyard.

    On the Market: Arlington Heights couple created dream home

    When a builder and an interior designer team up to create their own personal dream house, the result is usually pretty spectacular. That is certainly the case with a custom, all-brick colonial home in Arlington Heights that came on the market in mid-June.

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    The Goldman Family as they visit daughter Sam, second from left, during visitors day at Camp Wayne for Girls in Preston Park in Wayne County, Pa.

    Should parents visit kids at camp?

    The traditional day for parents, grandparents and siblings to check out what their campers are up to is definitely more about the grown-ups than the kids. The day isn’t only long and hot. Routines for the kids are disrupted and it can feel more about the goodies parents bring along than quality time.

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    Dr. Karen Halligan gives petroleum jelly to her her cat Nathan at her home in Marina del Rey, Calif. A number of over-the-counter dietary supplements such as Petromalt can be given to cats to help prevent hairballs, but Halligan uses a simple home remedy. She puts a dab of petroleum jelly on her fingertip and lets her cats, Kinky and Nathan, lick it off.

    Vet says a hairball a week is normal for most cats

    Hairballs are normal in cats, but they’re a nuisance for cat-owners to deal with. There are a few things you can do, though, to reduce hairballs and other feline dietary upsets.

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    Model Sofija Ajder as she wears shoes by Badgley Mischka at their studio in New York. The invitation to a summer party likely includes the time, place and date, but you might have to look between the lines to get a read on the dress code.

    Party dress codes can vary by zip code

    The invitation to a summer party likely includes the time, place and date, but you might have to look between the lines to get a read on the dress code. What you wear often depends on where you are — and the wardrobe of your friends and neighbors.

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    Teens take a ride upside down during last year's Frontier Days in Arlington Heights.

    Weekend picks: Take in Kansas, carnival at Frontier Days

    As if funnel cakes and carnival rides aren't enough of a draw to Arlington Heights' Frontier Days, Kansas rocks the annual fest at 8 p.m. Saturday. Come early to enjoy the “Taste of Arlington,” a carnival, games, live entertainment on three stages and more at Recreation Park.

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    Condo talk: Windows, doors and holes in the wall

    They say that the eyes are the windows to the soul; so then, what are windows. Are they the eyes into a major source of aggravation for condominium associations? This column will not address HOAs since most of them require all owners to maintain their own windows, with condominiums, they are an entirely different issue.

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    Mortgage Professor: Mortgage lender ratings under fire

    Q. “How much credence do you place in the 1- to 5-star ratings of lenders that many online mortgage sites provide based on reports from borrowers?”

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    Ask the broker: Falling foreclosure rate doesn’t equal market recovery

    Q. Foreclosures fell in February and have been down for several months. Isn’t this a sign that the real estate market is recovering?

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    On homes and real estate: Extension is seller’s decision, not agent’s

    Q. I am trying to close on a home. However, because I failed to file in 2008 and 2009, I have to wait for the IRS to put my returns into their system. It’s going to go beyond my closing date, and the listing agent is unwilling to give an extension. Is there anything I can do? I still want that house.

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    Some of McDowell Inc.’s projects and home additions for baby boomers have involved moving laundry rooms out of basements, or creating first-floor master suites.

    Industry Insider: McDowell Inc., St. Charles

    Today’s homeowners are exceedingly practical. While they are guarded and conservative about spending money, they refuse to let their largest investments their homes fall into disrepair or not work for them.

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    Foreclosures: The Time To Buy?

    For buyers looking to snag the lowest possible price, a foreclosed home just might be the way to go. According to data from RealtyTrac, buyers who purchased a foreclosed home in 2010 received a discount, paying 28 percent lower than the average sales price for non-foreclosure properties in the area. That's up from the 27 percent and 22 percent discounts seen in 2009 and 2008, respectively.

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    Associated Press Workers put finishing touches on the outside of the Charleston City Market after a $5.5 million renovation.

    Renovation finishes on Charleston City Market

    A $5.5 million, 18-month facelift has given a new look to the Charleston City Market, among the oldest city markets in the nation and one of the most popular attractions in this coastal city that attracts millions of visitors each year.

Discuss

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    Don’t make assumptions
    It is unfortunate that Mr. Bell feels I am not worthy of the public trust. I take my job very seriously and do understand the frustration felt over the present tax situation. It is also unfortunate that some people lack the common sense to pass judgment without having all of the facts in hand.

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    Hot dog purist makes his cas(ing)
    Whether Vienna Beef or Red Hot Chicago wins the flavor war, my wife and I will stay with the old-fashioned linked hot dogs in natural casings; They are the real winners. Or is that wieners?

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    What summer festivals bring to our sense of community
    A Daily Herald editorial toasts the community festival, an endearing rite of summer and an enduring link to the past.

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