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Daily Archive : Friday July 1, 2011

News

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    Drug Enforcement Agency assistant special agent Paul Rozario speaks during a news conference Thursday announcing the state’s largest methamphetamine bust in history.

    Vegas cops confiscate 208 pounds of meth

    Ten illegal immigrants from Mexico were arrested on drug trafficking charges after federal and Las Vegas law enforcement officials seized 212 pounds of drugs worth $5.7 million in the largest methamphetamine bust in Nevada history.

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    Police reports
    Two vehicles and a police car were reportedly damaged in separate incidents after midnight July 2 along Randall Road, police reports said.

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    Wheaton Park District officials say they are confident the sale of the former Hubble Middle School site to Bradford Equities will allow them to maintain their recreation facilities at the site.

    Hubble deal expected to benefit park district, too

    Wheaton Park District will work with Bradford Equities LLC to buy 13 acres of land on the old Hubble site to preserve its 94,000-plus user hours.

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    Stephen D. Gallagher

    Hoffman man in critical condition after car surfing accident

    People from Schaumburg and Crystal Lake have been charged after using their vehicles for car surfing in Crystal Lake in which another person from Hoffman Estates was critically injured.

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    The Dog Days of Summer in downtown Libertyville July 7-10 will feature more than 100 nationally ranked top jumping dogs competing for prizes and rankings, as well as a variety of canine-focused competitions, promotions and activities.

    Dog Days of Summer comes to Libertyville July 7-10

    The Dog Days of Summer in downtown Libertyville July 7 through 10 will feature more than 100 nationally ranked top jumping dogs competing for prizes and rankings, as well as a variety of canine focused competitions, promotions and activities.

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    The children of Kapeeka community in Uganda’s seven elementary schools have no access to public libraries. The Cook Memorial Public Library District, Vernon Hills High School, Bookfriends Inc., and COVE Alliance are joining together with area residents to supply them with a shipment of children’s books.

    Cook Library District collects children’s books for Uganda

    This summer, by donating a new or gently used Children's book from June 1 through August 1, you will be helping Cook Memorial Public Library District truly embrace the summer reading club theme of One World, Many Stories by joining forces with Vernon Hills High School, Bookfriends, Inc., and COVE Alliance to spread the joy and love of reading overseas to the faraway shores of Uganda.

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    William Delp

    SEDOL boss goes out with honor

    Special Education District of Lake County’s superintendent has received an honor naming him tops in his field by his peers.

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    Man with hammer steals jewelry in Arlington Hts.

    A man wearing white socks on his hands used a hammer to break into an Arlington Heights jewelry store and take about 50 pieces of jewelry, authorities said.

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    Salvador Sarabia

    Police say 911 tape reveals details of Elgin burglary

    Elgin police on Friday released a 911 tape of a terrified 13-year-old girl who was hiding in her basement and whispering calls of help while two men broke into and burglarized her home.

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    Power restored to “virtually all”

    As of 10 p.m. Friday, ComEd officials said power had been restored to “virtually all” 145,000 customers in northern Illinois who lost it due to Thursday's storm. The company expects to have the remaining isolated outages in heavily damaged areas restored by Saturday morning.

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    Cubs manager Mike Quade, left, and Sox manager Ozzie Guillen chat before Friday's at Wrigley Field.

    Sox heading toward BP Cup

    Big L over the el: The heat wave never materialized Friday at Wrigley Field.

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    Parade, fireworks not on same day in Fox Lake

    For the first time in recent years, the Celebrate Fox Lake parade and the Chain O’ Lakes fireworks show are not on the same day, a change that’s causing some confusion, officials said.

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    Palatine library hosts healthy life workshop

    The Palatine Public Library District will be hosting a 6-week health workshop, “Living a Healthy Life with Chronic Conditions” 2-4:30 p.m. Sundays beginning July 17 at 700 N. North Court.

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    Hanover Township hosts computer fair for seniors

    Hanover Township will host a computer fair for seniors from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tuesday, July 12 at the Township Senior Center, 240 S. Rte. 59, Bartlett.

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    Luthern General gets stroke care award

    Advocate Lutheran General Hospital has received the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines-Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award.

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    Rep. Thaddeus McCotter, a Michigan Republican, confirmed Friday on WJR-AM he'll make a formal announcement about his candidacy on Saturday. The 45-year-old McCotter is a lawyer and served as a state senator, Wayne County commissioner and Schoolcraft Community College trustee before entering the U.S. House in 2003.

    GOP Mich. US Rep. McCotter running for president

    U.S. Rep. Thaddeus McCotter, a guitar-playing five-term congressman from Detroit's suburbs known for his eccentric sense of humor and independent streak, said Friday that he plans to seek the Republican nomination for president.

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    President Barack Obama's choice for his next counterterrorism chief is Matthew Olsen, a former prosecutor with extensive experience in intelligence matters for the federal government, the White House announced Friday.

    Obama chooses new counterterror chief

    President Barack Obama's choice for his next counterterrorism chief is Matthew Olsen, a former prosecutor with extensive experience in intelligence matters for the federal government, the White House announced Friday.

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    Seattle man charged in 1957 slaying of Sycamore girl

    A Seattle man has been arrested in the slaying of a 7-year-old girl — more than a half-century after she was abducted near Sycamore and killed.

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    McHenry woman killed in crash

    A McHenry woman died after her car struck a railroad crossing standard early Friday morning, authorities said.

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    Christopher Brewer

    Glen Ellyn man charged with stealing, submerging truck

    A Glen Ellyn man has been charged with stealing a truck and trailer that ended up partially submerged in Lake Ellyn last month.

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    The Farmers Airship, one of only two Zeppelins currently flying globally, makes a stop at the DuPage County Airport in West Chicago. It is the largest passenger airship in the world, 15 feet longer than a Boeing 747 and 50 feet longer than the largest blimp.

    Farmers Airship arrives in DuPage

    One of only two Zeppelins currently flying globally, at 246 feet in length, the Farmers Airship is the largest passenger airship in the world — 15 feet longer than a Boeing 747, and 50 feet longer than the largest blimp.

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    Robert Jackson

    4 charged in Naperville home invasion

    Four people — including a 15-year-old — have been charged in connection with a home invasion on Naperville's northwest side. The suspects forced their way into a home on the 1400 block of Fairway Drive about 5:21 p.m. Tuesday, police said.

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    Mt. Prospect storm cleanup continues

    The Mount Prospect Public Works department will temporarily halt brush collection July 3 and 4, and will limit July 2 clean-up efforts to the removal of hanging limbs. Street-by-street brush collection from the more than 2,600 damaged trees will resume on July 5 and should be completed by July 8.

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    Kent Gaffney

    Gaffney talks about succeeding friend Beaubien

    Newly appointed state Rep. Kent Gaffney said the possibility of his succeeding the seven-term Mark Beaubien was something Beaubien wanted to discuss with him in detail someday.

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    Patrick Taylor

    Rolling Meadows cop testifies in murder trial

    Prosecutors on Friday showed jurors photographs and a videotape that police made of a Rolling Meadows condominium where they say Patrick Taylor shot and killed 30-year-old rap music producer and performer Marquis Lovings on Aug 19, 2006.

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    Gov. Pat Quinn wants to cancel raises for thousands of state employees to help cope with the Illinois budget crisis, his office said Friday.

    Quinn plans to skip $77 million in raises

    Gov. Pat Quinn wants to cancel raises for thousands of state employees to help cope with the Illinois budget crisis, his office said Friday.

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    Declan Sullivan

    Sullivan family has no problem with ND fine reduction

    Declan Sullivan's family expressed no qualms Friday with the University of Notre Dame agreement to pay a reduced fine to the Indiana Department of Labor over the Long Grove student's death.

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    Aurora Christian School at 2255 Sullivan Road in Aurora can remain in its building for the next school year.

    Aurora Christian gets to stay put another year

    Aurora Christian School will have at least one more year at its Sullivan Road campus, officials announced Friday.

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    Suburban regional offices in limbo after Quinn cuts

    SPRINGFIELD — When Gov. Pat Quinn cut all the state money from regional offices of education, he largely left suburban officials with more questions than answers. Will the regional offices close in the coming weeks? Will local districts or counties pick up the tab? And who will run the programs regional superintendents do if there’s no money? “It’s very confusing,” said DuPage County Regional...

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    Tammy Duckworth

    Duckworth eyeing another congressional bid?

    Hoffman Estates Democrat Tammy Duckworth, the Iraq veteran who lost a high-profile campaign for Congress to Republican Peter Roskam in 2006, might be eyeing Washington again.

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    Kane Co. may see projected budget surplus vanish

    Mid-year budget projections for Kane County show the potential for a $176,000 surplus at the end of the year. But non-budgeted costs in the court system may quickly eat up all of that surplus plus the contingency funds set aside for emergency costs this year.

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    Civilians nab purse thief in Lake Zurich, police say

    A group of good Samaritans chased and detained a suspected purse thief Thursday in Lake Zurich, police said.

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    A firefighter suffered a minor injury Friday when a blaze ripped through a one-story house in an unincorporated area near Glen Ellyn.

    No injuries as fire destroys house near Glen Ellyn

    Fire destroyed a one-story house near Glen Ellyn Friday. One firefighter was slightly injured while battling the blaze.

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    Dominique Strauss- Kahn leaves New York State Supreme court with his wife Anne Sinclair, Friday, July 1, 2011, in New York. A judge has agreed to free former International Monetary Fund leader Strauss-Kahn without bail or home confinement in the sexual assault case against him. The criminal case against him stands.

    Strauss-Kahn free from house arrest; charges stand

    Former International Monetary Fund leader Dominique Strauss-Kahn walked out of court without bail and free from house arrest Friday after prosecutors said an extensive background investigation of the hotel housekeeper accusing him of sexual assault gave them pause.

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    Tri-Cities police reports

    • A stolen dump truck was used to remove tools, a dishwasher, a stove and microwave from a home under construction in the 1S900 block of Dauberman Road near Maple Park between 8 p.m. June 22 and 6 a.m. June 23, reports said. The dump truck was later found near Dauberman and Interstate 88, reports said.

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    Fox Valley police briefs

    • A 42-year-old man reported identity theft to Elgin police Thursday afternoon. The man said his employer contacted him to say someone applied for unemployment using his Social Security number. The employer is trying to stop the person from receiving unemployment pay.

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    A day after stepping down as CIA director, Leon Panetta was sworn in Friday as secretary of defense.

    Panetta takes over Pentagon, cites priorities

    On his first day as Pentagon chief, Leon Panetta said his top priorities are preserving U.S. military power despite budget cuts, defeating al-Qaida, stabilizing Afghanistan and forging a "real and lasting partnership" with Iraq.

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    Nearly 800 recruits march onto Ross Field at Great Lakes Naval Station during graduating ceremonies Friday, the 100th anniversary of the base.

    Great Lakes Naval Station marks 100th anniversary

    Great Lakes Naval Station celebrated its 100th anniversary Friday with plenty of pageantry before about 6,000 spectators on a field named for the base’s first commanding officer.

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    Elgin Community College student John Halwix of Marengo and Chuck Timm, an adviser to the ECC SkillsUSA team, check out the competition site in Kansas City, Mo. before the sheet metal national competition at which Halwix won a gold medal.

    ECC students capture medals at national contest

    Five students from Elgin Community College finished in the Top 10 in the nation in various categories in the recent SkillsUSA competition in Kansas City, Mo. One student took home a gold medal. It was the first time in the four years ECC has competed that students have earned medals.

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    Rahm Emanuel

    Emanuel works to fill budget gap after furloughs

    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is proposing ways to help fill a $31 million budget gap now that an agreement with workers to take furlough days has ended.

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    Carol Stream man charged in Streamwood crash

    A 27-year-old Carol Stream man has been charged with aggravated DUI after being involved in a two-car accident on June 24 in Streamwood.

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    Dist. 47 to start up activity buses

    Middle school students in Crystal Lake Elementary District 47 won’t need to rely on Mom or Dad for a ride if they want to stay after school for sports, clubs or to study.

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    Lake County offering new anti-smoking program

    A new quit smoking program called “Break the Habit” has been launched for Lake County residents who use the Illinois Tobacco Quitline. Eligible participants can get up to four boxes of Nicotine Replacement Therapy patches for $10 each and receive free telephone-based counseling to quit their tobacco use. The patches are available at Walgreens pharmacies in Highwood and Round Lake Beach or from...

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    Libertyville police focusing on DUI enforcement this weekend

    Libertyville police will focus on impaired drivers and safety belt violators as part of an intensified enforcement effort during the Fourth of July holiday weekend. The effort will focus mainly on late-night hours as statistics show a disproportionate number of traffic deaths occur at that time and involve a drinking driver and/or unbuckled motorist. Libertyville police joins the Illinois State...

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    Lake Co. forest district offering program

    Children can enjoy an afternoon outdoors with the Lake County Forest Preserve District’s “Playdate with Nature” program on July 21. The activity is planned for 1 p.m. at the Van Patten Woods preserve near Wadsworth. Admission is free, and no registration is required. Children should be accompanied by parents or other caregivers. To learn more, visit lcfpd.org.

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    The Glen Ellyn Fourth of July parade will head down Main Street after starting at noon Monday at Glenbard West High School.

    Glen Ellyn parade a slice of Americana

    Perhaps the best local real-life depiction of a Norman Rockwell-like Fourth of July portrait can be found in Glen Ellyn.

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    Villa Park parade has new route, surprise grand marshal

    Villa Park's annual Fourth of July parade will have a new route this year due to ongoing construction on Villa Avenue, plus a surprise grand marshal.

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    Round Lake Beach resident finishes infantry training

    Lifelong Round Lake Beach resident John Mikrut has reached a milestone in his Army career.

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    A cast member is silhouetted against the stage background during a production of Pop Fusion at Six Flags amusement park in Gurnee.

    Images: Behind the Scenes with Pop Fusion at Six Flags Great America
    Take a look behind the scenes at the new stage show titled Pop Fusion, being performed this summer in Gurnee at Six Flags Great America.

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    Cast members do their grand finale during the production of “Pop Fusion” at Six Flags.

    Six Flags’ ‘Pop Fusion’ a big-time production

    A behind the scenes look at a new stage "Pop Fusion" show being performed at Six Flags Great America in Gurnee.

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    Today, a ban that Gov. Pat Quinn signed into law in March took effect, shutting down Illinois' death row. It's a quiet last chapter to the story of capital punishment in Illinois, which captured the attention of the world in 2000 when then-Gov. George Ryan imposed a moratorium. Ryan cleared death row entirely three years later. Illinois has executed 12 men since 1977 when the death penalty was reinstated, the last one in 1999.

    Illinois death row officially shuts down

    The death penalty ban that Gov. Pat Quinn signed into law in March takes effect today. It's a quiet last chapter to the story of capital punishment in Illinois.

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    Lisle’s Fourth of July parade is making its return to downtown Lisle for the first time since 1973 with a southbound march down Main Street, from School Street to Jonquil Avenue.

    Lisle parade returns to Main Street

    Nearly canceled by construction, Lisle's Fourth of July Parade returns to its roots to march down Main Street for the first time in 38 years.

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    Mundelein to enforce fireworks ban

    When it comes to backyard fireworks, only mild devices like snakes, glow worm pellets, smoke devices, sparklers and party poppers will be allowed in Mundelein on Independence Day weekend.

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    An Uncle Sam impersonator on stilts chats with costumed interpreters during a past Fourth of July Celebration at Kline Creek Farm. The 1890s farm provides a living history lesson for all who visit its grounds.

    Kline Creek offers historic holiday celebration

    "Celebrating the Fourth" takes visitors to Kline Creek Farm back to an 1800s-style celebration of patriotism with activities on Saturday and Sunday, July 2 and 3.

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    Chicago man charged in Villa Park shooting

    A Chicago man has been charged in connection with the shooting of a man in Villa Park, police said. The victim is being treated at Elmhurst Memorial Hospital.

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    Chad Koppie

    Koppie may run for 33rd District Senate seat

    A candidate with extensive experience in high-level races and a penchant for controversy soon may add his name to the list of Republicans seeking the new 33rd District state Senate seat. Chad Koppie spends most of his time farming these days in Gilberts. But voters probably know him better for his runs for U.S. Senate and his lively challenge to George Ryan in a 1998 Republican gubernatorial...

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    Mount Prospect house party leads to charges

    Three adults face charges and two juveniles received citations after they were found partying in a vacant, for-sale town home June 17.

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    Jayson Cobb of Alabama hugs his fiance Haley Martin after graduation ceremonies at Great Lakes Naval Station Friday. About 1,000 recruits graduated on its 100th anniversary.

    Images: Great Lakes Naval Station 100th anniversary.
    Great Lakes Naval Station held their rededication ceremony on Friday as part of their 100th anniversary celebration. 1,000 naval recruits also graduated on Friday.

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    Cheryl Luchetta

    DuPage prosecutors seek mental evaluation for Elmhurst mom

    DuPage County prosecutors on Friday sought a mental evaluation for an Elmhurst woman charged with the attempted murder of her 7-year-old son, but her attorney said it would be premature.

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    Louis Bianchi

    Judge: 2 Bianchi prosecutors must stay

    The second misconduct case against McHenry County State’s Attorney Louis Bianchi will proceed with the same two special prosecutors initially appointed to the case, a judge ruled Friday.

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    A defiant Moammar Gadhafi threatened Friday to carry out attacks in Europe against "homes, offices, families," unless NATO halts its campaign of airstrikes against his regime in Libya.

    Defiant Gadhafi threatens attacks in Europe

    A defiant Moammar Gadhafi threatened Friday to carry out attacks in Europe against "homes, offices, families," unless NATO halts its campaign of airstrikes against his regime in Libya.

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    Casey Anthony talks to an unidentified man during her murder trial at the Orange County Courthouse Thursday.

    Indefinite recess called in Casey Anthony trial

    The judge in the Florida murder trial of Casey Anthony unexpectedly called an indefinite recess Friday morning so the defense could take depositions of witnesses the prosecution plans to call during its rebuttal case.

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    Arlington Hts.: Don’t save your parade spot

    Arlington Heights officials are asking residents to wait until at least Sunday night before using a blanket, chair or any other item to reserve a spot for Monday's Fourth of July parade.

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    Elgin cooling center opened

    With temperatures predicted to hit near 100 today, Elgin has activated its cooling center in the lobby area of the police department, 151 Douglas Ave. Should there be a need, the backup cooling center is the Centre of Elgin, 100 Symphony Way.

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    Libertyville may boost digital presence

    Libertyville residents could get access to more online information and services as village leaders consider options to freshen the website.

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    LITH might get disc golf course

    A disc golf course might come to Lake in the Hills by next summer, courtesy of the Lake in the Hills Rotary Club. The club wants to develop a 9-hole course on the newly renamed Linda K. Fischer Park at 5962 Grafton Farm Drive.

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    Construction on the Randall Road overpass at I-88 in North Aurora continues Wednesday. Traffic is only open northbound on the overpass.

    Randall/I-88 bridge work near halfway point

    There’s good road construction news for Aurora and North Aurora drivers. Work to replace the deck of the Randall Road bridge over I-88 is almost halfway done.

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    Fernando Chavez

    Addison man facing child porn charges

    An Addison man accused of using nine aliases and email accounts to post child pornography on Facebook and other websites was ordered held Friday on $300,000 bail. Fernando Chavez, 27, was charged with four counts each of child pornography and aggravated child pornography.

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    The National Weather Service has issued a heat advisory starting at noon Friday as near record-breaking temperatures are expected after less severe thunderstorms move out of the area, officials said.

    Suburbs bracing for heat wave today

    The National Weather Service has issued a heat advisory starting at noon Friday as near record-breaking temperatures are expected after less severe thunderstorms move out of the area, officials said.

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    Five-minute parking spots meant to save space for customers of downtown Lombard businesses are not helping shops like 20 West, a liquor store, stay profitable during Lombard’s weekly Cruise Nights because the time limit is not being enforced, entrepreneurs say. Village staff members say police are enforcing the time limits.

    Lombard Cruise Night parking concerns continue

    Five-minute parking spots meant to save space for customers of downtown Lombard businesses are not helping shops like 20 West, a liquor store, stay profitable during Lombard’s weekly Cruise Nights because the time limit is not being enforced, entrepreneurs say. Village staff say police on-site are enforcing the time limits.

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    A tethered RE/MAX balloon is stabilized by Bennett Schwontkowski Friday morning during the first attempted balloon launch at Lisle’s Eyes to the Skies festival.

    Lisle’s first balloon launch scrapped, but more to come

    Hot-air balloon launches are a staple of Lisle's annual Eyes to the Skies festival and this year is no different. The launches, though, are extremely weather dependent, as crews demonstrated on Friday morning.

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    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks at a meeting of the Lifeline Donor Steering Committee before the Community of Democracies ministerial conference Friday in Vilnius, Lithuania. Clinton is in Lithuania to attend the international democracy conference and commented Friday about reports on Syria, saying Assad's government is running out of time, that it must advance to a serious political process or face increased resistance.

    Clinton outlines road ahead for Arab democracy

    U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton said Friday that the rule of law, political parties and democratic institutions must emerge in the Arab world if it is to emulate Eastern Europe's remarkable transition two decades ago from authoritarianism to truly free societies.

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    Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, shown here with Cuba's Fidel Castro, revealed that he is fighting cancer.

    Chavez reveals he is fighting cancer after surgery

    Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez revealed that he is fighting cancer after having a tumor removed in Cuba, raising uncertainty about Venezuela's political future even as he assured his country he expects to fully recover.

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    Minnesota shutdown prompts political blame game

    The fight over who's to blame for Minnesota's government shutdown is on.State government closed for business at 12:01 a.m. Friday after Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton and Republican legislative majorities failed to reach a budget deal.

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    Man, 19, found drowned in Rend Lake

    BENTON — Divers have found the body of a 19-year-old man who drowned in southern Illinois’ Rend Lake.The search for Catreal Brown ended Thursday afternoon, a day after Franklin County authorities say he disappeared in the water while swimming with friends.Sheriff Don Jones tells the Benton Evening News that it isn’t clear why Brown drowned.

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    2 accused of setting fires in Cairo

    CAIRO — Two men who helped Cairo’s firefighters in battling blazes are accused of setting fires in January in the Alexander County city along the Ohio River.Twenty-two-year-old David Patrick of Arlington, Ky., and 18-year-old Richard Pitcher of Cairo are charged with arson.Both men were probationary members of the Cairo Auxiliary Fire Department.

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    Authorities said 70-year-old Robert Bostic, upper left, almost got away with murder. It took 28 years to arrest Bostic on charges he killed Carlton Richmond in Round Lake Beach, but Lake County Sheriff's police say they got the right man, allowing them to close one of their cold cases.

    Why suburban murder cases go cold

    Authorities said 70-year-old Robert Bostic almost got away with murder. It took 28 years for Lake County sheriff's police to arrest Bostic in the murder of Carlton Richmond. But several other cases go cold.

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    General Mills completes $1.2B Yoplait buy

    General Mills Inc. said Friday its $1.2 billion acquisition of a controlling stake in yogurt company Yoplait is complete. The cereal maker now owns 51 percent of the company, while French investment firm PAI Partners and cooperative dairy group Sodiaal has the other 49 percent.

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    Maine's LL Bean rehires 4 after discount error

    The Maine outdoor retailer L.L. Bean says four workers fired for buying a leather tote bag after its price had been inadvertently reduced on the company's website are getting their jobs back.

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    Police say Carlos Rico abandoned his 4-year-old son along a West Texas highway, and the injured boy spent several hours alone in the dark before a passing motorist picked him up.

    Charge upped for Texas man accused of ditching son

    A father accused of abandoning his 4-year-old son along a rural West Texas highway in the middle of the night was charged Thursday with attempted capital murder, prosecutors said.

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    The Las Conchas Fire burns through a canyon in Los Alamos, N,M.

    Crews battle NM fire, which pushes into canyon

    Firefighters were confident Thursday they had stopped the advance of a wildfire that headed toward the Los Alamos nuclear lab and the nearby town that now sits empty for the second time in 11 years, even as they battled the blaze that crept into a canyon that descends into the town and parts of the lab.

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    Having insisted there is too much to do for lawmakers to spend a week away from the Capitol, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., center, walks with Senate Majority Whip Richard Durbin and Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y

    Recess canceled; Senate to work next week on debt

    The Senate canceled its planned July Fourth recess on Thursday, but partisan divisions remained razor sharp as the clock ticked on efforts to strike a deal to avoid a government default and trim huge federal deficits.

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    Chavez reveals he is fighting cancer after surgery

    Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez revealed that he is fighting cancer after having a tumor removed in Cuba, raising uncertainty about his political future even as he assured his country he expects to fully recover.

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    Dennis DeYoung

    The Hemmens outlines new season of entertainment

    The Hemmens Cultural Center in Elgin has a season anchored by comedy and classic rock with Elgin Summer Theatre and a short film festival to round out the performance list.

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    Kevin McDowell sits with triathlon teammates Nolan Dickson, left, and Kelly Whitley as McDowell gets a chemotherapy treatment in Geneva. McDowell, an elite triathlete, had been a favorite to win triathlon in the Junior World Championships at the junior level until he was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma this spring. His friend and teammate Lukas Verzbicas, who has committed to a running career at the University of Oregon, made the decision to compete in McDowell’s place to honor his friend.

    Runner puts dreams on hold for Geneva tri teammate

    Elite triathlon athletes Kevin McDowell, Geneva, and Lukas Verzbicas are "Team Brothers." When McDowell was diagnosed with Hodgkin’s lymphoma this spring, Verzbicas decided to compete in McDowell’s place to honor his friend.

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    Delta changing flight plans in Peoria

    Delta Airlines plans to add flights between Peoria and Detroit but also will cut back its service to Minneapolis.

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    Private company begins managing Illinois Lottery

    A private company is officially taking over management of Illinois’ lottery with a promise to boost sales and revenue.Gov. Pat Quinn chose Northstar Lottery Group earlier this year and the company is taking over Friday. The company will be paid a $15-million-a-year management fee and a percentage of profits it produces above $650 million.

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    Police cracking down on holiday drunken driving

    Ten people died in motor vehicle crashes in Illinois during last year’s Fourth of July weekend. Seven of those fatalities involved a driver who’d been drinking.To prevent crashes, police throughout the state are cracking down on drunk driving and enforcing seat belt laws this weekend.

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    Woman arrested in Palos Heights bank robbery

    A Chicago woman has been charged with robbing a suburban bank of $120,000 earlier this year while wearing a mask and nun habit.Federal court documents indicate Navahcia Edwards formerly worked at the TCF Bank branch in Palos Heights that was robbed May 29.

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    Bradley University to offer semester in Hollywood

    PEORIA, Ill. — Bradley University students, welcome to Hollywood!The Peoria school says its new “Hollywood Semester” is an intense program in Los Angeles giving students the chance to learn about the entertainment industry. It will first be offered during the spring semester of 2012.

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    Nursing home worker accused in painkiller theft

    EDWARDSVILLE, Ill. — A worker at a southwestern Illinois nursing home is accused of removing an 87-year-old patient’s prescription pain reliever so she could ingest it herself.Madison County prosecutors charged 41-year-old Kathleen Lung of Alton with criminal abuse or neglect of an elderly person and unlawful possession of a controlled substance.

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    Illinois agency issues fireworks license reminder

    State officials say it’s best to leave the big fireworks shows to the professionals.

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    Cook County pulls plug on “Project Shield”

    Cook County officials have ended “Project Shield,” a security program designed to equip 128 municipal police departments with cameras in squad cars and at stationary locations capable of sending live video back to command centers in the event of a terrorist attack.

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    Robert J. Adams of Arlington Heights was both honest, returning $17,021 he found, and dishonest, telling police a lie about where he found the cash. Nothing is really black and white in real life, says Scott R. Paeth, an associate professor of religious studies at DePaul University.

    Man who lied about $17,021 proves human complexity

    The story of the Arlington Heights man who found $17,021 getting in trouble for lying about his honesty is the perfect example of the human condition. “I had a lot of fun doing this — for a week,” Adams said with a laugh. “But after that? Well, I understand why Lindsay Lohan has so many problems.”

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    The old Hubble Middle School will most likely be a Mariano’s Grocery Store, the first grocery store in or near downtown since Jewel left in February 2008.

    Developer: Grocery store coming to Hubble site in Wheaton

    Wheaton Warrenville Unit District 200 finalizes the deal for the old Hubble Middle School site near downtown Wheaton. And yes, a Mariano's will go there.

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    The picture was taken at the Batavia Depot Museum the day after the Batavia Bulldogs had been placed on display throughout downtown.

    Images: Photo Contest Finalists
    Each week you submit your favorite photo. We pick the best of the bunch and select 12 finlaists. Here are the finalists for the week of June 27th.

Sports

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    Sky drops third straight

    Diana Taurasi scored 24 points to lead the Phoenix Mercury past the Chicago Sky 97-84 on Friday night.

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    Rush snuffs out Blaze

    The Chicago Rush clinched a playoff berth with a 52-35 win at the Allstate Arena on Friday night.

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    Bandits produce a winning response

    On First Responder’s Night at Rosemont Stadium, a celebration of all those who serve our country, the Chicago Bandits responded first with their bats in a 10-4 victory over the NPF Diamonds at Rosemont Stadium.

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    Toronto Maple Leafs' Luke Schenn, right, helps goalie James Reimer defend the net against Minnesota's Andrew Brunette last March. The Blackhawks signed the gritty Brunette on Friday.

    Hawks' Bowman loads up on toughness

    Blackhawks general manager Stan Bowman wasn't kidding when he said his plan for free agency was to add more toughness, grit, character and veteran leadership to a dressing room in need of it all.

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    Juan Pierre rounds first after hitting a two-run triple off Cubs starting pitcher Randy Wells, scoring Alex Rios and Adam Dunn, during the seventh inning Friday at Wrigley Field.

    Pierre's triple gives White Sox third straight win

    The good thing about watching two teams with a penchant for self-immolation? When they face each other, the winner gets to start believing it's catching fire.

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    Carcillo addition caps Hawks’ day

    Dan Carcillo is coming to town with the Blackhawks. Let the craziness begin.

  •  
    St. Louis Blues’ Brad Winchester, left, and San Jose Sharks’ Jamal Mayers fight during the first period of an NHL hockey game Thursday, Nov. 4, 2010, in St. Louis.

    Images: The Newest Blackhawks
    The Chicago Blackhawks have agreed to terms with forwards Andrew Brunette, Jamal Mayers, Dan Carcillo and Brett McLean, and defenseman Sean O’Donnell on one-year contracts.

  •  
    Are women athletes too nice? Seattle Storm’s Katie Smith (14) shares a recent laugh with Phoenix Mercury’s Diana Taurasi, one of the more competitive stars in the league, during a game last month as a free throw was being shot. Patricia Babcock McGraw wants to know if you think women’s teams would draw more attention and grow their sport if more athletes were edgier, nasty or polarizing, like some male athletes today.

    Could women’s sports use some bad girls?

    Men’s sports are full of polarizing figures who attract all kinds of attention. Patricia Babcock McGraw wonders if women’s sports would get more of a following if the athletes were edgier, more outspoken and more brash.

  •  
    Cubs pitcher Carlos Zambrano was put on the 15-day disabled list today because of soreness in his lower back.

    Hendry: DL for Zambrano not a major thing

    The Chicago Cubs have placed starter Carlos Zambrano on the 15-day disabled list because of soreness in his lower back and activated reliever Kerry Wood.

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    White Sox are starting to click

    The White Sox have a lot of good things going at the moment and manager Ozzie Guillen says the bullpen is at the top of the list.

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    Juan Pierre hits a two-run triple during the four-run seventh against the Cubs Friday.

    Much-maligned Pierre suddenly red-hot

    White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen has been defending left fielder Juan Pierre all season, and his patience is finally paying off. Pierre helped rally the Sox to victory for the second straight game Friday with a 2-run triple vs. the Cubs.

  •  
    Cubs starting pitcher Randy Wells took the loss Friday against the White Sox. Manager Mike Quade took the blame for leaving Wells in too long Friday. Wells gave up 4 runs in the seventh inning.

    Quade shoulders blame for Wells decision

    Mike Quade didn't wait for the pre-Fourth of July grilling to come. The Cubs manager lit the coals himself. That didn't make his seventh-inning decision right. It wasn't. But he put the heat to himself about leaving starting pitcher Randy Wells in too long in Friday's 6-4 loss to the White Sox at Wrigley Field. “Sometimes, you take it too far,” Quade said at the outset. “This one is on me as far as I'm concerned. He was rolling. When the game got tied, and given the bullpen situation, I backed off and really tried to push him through it, a matchup that wasn't very favorable. And I'm a matchup guy. Don't know what would have happened, but (Jeff) Samardzija was ready, and I could have gone to him.”Here was the situation:Wells, who had gone no longer than 6 innings in any of his 7 previous starts this year, had just pitched 6 creditable innings of 2-run ball, and the Cubs had a 4-2 lead. As the White Sox came to bat in the top of the seventh, nobody was warming up in the Cubs bullpen. A.J. Pierzynski led off with a single. Alexei Ramirez followed by cracking a home run on a 1-1 slider over the wall in left field. Just like that, game tied. Opportunity for a quality start and a shot of confidence for Wells gone. There's more. Wells remained in the game. Alex Rios singled, and after Gordon Beckham grounded out, White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen went with the left-handed Adam Dunn to pinch hit against the right-handed Wells with another left-handed batter, Juan Pierre, on deck. Those were the bad matchups Quade knew were looming earlier. Wells walked Dunn, and Pierre yanked a pitch from Wells into the right-field corner for a 2-run triple. So Wells entered the inning having pitched 6 innings with 2 earned runs. He exited having pitched 6⅓ with 6 runs given up. On top of it, Quade had no left-hander warming up. He didn't want to use John Grabow or James Russell, and he said Sean Marshall was his closer because Carlos Marmol had worked 2 innings Thursday. Grabow worked 2 innings Thursday, but Russell was hardly overtaxed. Quade's plan was to go with Samardzija in the seventh, Kerry Wood (fresh off the disabled list) in the eighth and Marshall in the ninth. But he didn't pull the trigger in time. “There are plenty of decisions you make that don't work that are the right decisions,” he said. “The more I looked at that, the more I wanted to push him (Wells) through. My thing was if we have a 1-run lead, I'm going to Samardz. But because it was tied, I'm going to try to push Wellsie through. In retrospect, just bring a guy in and hope we can score a run late.“It was something I tried to push through and I shouldn't have.”Ÿ Follow Bruce's Cubs reports via Twitter@BruceMiles2112, and join the conversation with other Cubs fans on our baseball blog, Chicago's Inside Pitch, at dailyherald.com.

  •  
    Cubs GM Jim Hendry says the team might be both buyers and sellers in July.

    Hendry insists Cubs not standing pat

    If GM Jim Hendry left the impression that the Cubs will be quiet in July, he says it's not true and there will be moves to be made.

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    Cubs manager Mike Quade and Sox manager Ozzie Guillen chat while the Crosstown Cup rests on home plate before Friday’s game at Wrigley Field.

    Images: Cubs vs. Sox at Wrigley Field, game one.
    The Cubs and White Sox renewed their cross-town rivalry on Friday. In this series, the teams meet at Wrigley for three games. The White Sox won Friday 6-4.

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    Chicago Fire game day
    The Fire take on Chivas USA Saturday night at Home Depot Center.

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    Fire captain dons headgear after concussion

    Fire midfielder Logan Pause will have some odd-looking headgear when he returns to Major League Soccer play on Saturday at Chivas USA.

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    Novak Djokovic celebrates Friday after defeating France's Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in their men's semifinal at the All England Lawn Tennis Championships at Wimbledon.

    Djokovic, Nadal make Wimbledon final

    Novak Djokovic secured the No. 1 ranking by reaching the Wimbledon final on Friday, and he will get a chance to beat the man he is replacing — defending champion Rafael Nadal.

  •  

    Fielders drop third straight to Chico

    Chico, Calif. – The Chico Outlaws defeated the Lake County Fielders, 7-6, on Thursday night in a back-and-forth battle that took 13 innings to decide. It was the first time this season that the Fielders lost three consecutive games.

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    Cubs sign Florida State wide receiver

    Taiwan Easterling, a three-year starter for the Seminoles who had at least one catch in each of his last 24 games, signed a professional contract with the Chicago Cubs and is foregoing his final year of football eligibility.

  •  
    Alberto Contador leaves for a training ride near Les Herbiers, western France, on Thursday. The Tour de France starts on Saturday. Contador, the event’s defending champion, is at the center of an ongoing doping case.

    Contador vows to handle pressure at Tour de France

    Alberto Contador says he is mentally tough enough to defend his Tour de France title under the intense pressure and scrutiny of an ongoing doping case. The Spaniard begins his quest for a fourth win on Saturday.

Business

  •  
    A person familiar with the matter says search giant Google is one of about a dozen companies involved in talks to potentially buy online video site Hulu.

    AP Source: Google among firms looking to buy Hulu

    Search giant Google Inc. is one of about a dozen companies involved in talks to potentially buy online video site Hulu, a person familiar with the matter said Friday. As the owner of YouTube, it would be a strategic buy for the Silicon Valley technology company, which has had a rocky relationship with Hulu's Hollywood owners.

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    World markets posted muted gains Friday, July 1, 2011, with Tokyo rising to an eight-week high, as investors took heart from debt-strapped Greece's approval of harsh austerity measures but remained wary following signs of slowing growth in China.

    Stocks close huge week with rally; Dow up 168

    An unexpected rebound in U.S. manufacturing surprised investors. Many had lowered their estimates for growth over the last two months as the economic recovery appeared to be slowing down. A shortage of computer chips and auto parts from Japan, higher gas prices and severe weather in the South all contributed to the gloomier estimates.

  •  
    Zynga Inc. hopes to raise up to $1 billion in an initial public offering that follows LinkedIn's sizzling stock market debut last month. The amount of money Zynga is seeking in its IPO will likely change as its bankers determine how many shares should be sold and at what price. That process typically takes three to four months.

    'FarmVille' creator Zynga to go public

    Zynga, the online game maker behind "FarmVille" and other popular Facebook pastimes, is going public, the latest in a crop of high-valued Internet IPOs expected after LinkedIn Corp. showed that the online networking craze is a hot commodity on Wall Street.

  •  
    BP Chief Tony Hayward

    BP Chief Hayward denied trying to prop up share prices

    Under questioning from the Justice Department and plaintiffs suing the oil giant he once ran, Tony Hayward fought off accusations that he sought to prop up BP's falling share price through his subordinates' daily media briefings on the Gulf oil spill.

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    Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner urged Congress to raise the limit and "avoid the catastrophic economic and market consequences of a default crisis."

    Treasury confirms deadline for raising debt limit

    Congress has one month to raise the nation's borrowing limit or the government will default on its debt, the Treasury Department said Friday.

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    Two years after economists say the Great Recession ended, the recovery has been the weakest and most lopsided of any since the 1930s.

    The economic recovery turns 2: Feel better yet?

    This is one anniversary few feel like celebrating. Two years after economists say the Great Recession ended, the recovery has been the weakest and most lopsided of any since the 1930s.

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    Eurozone delays decision on new Greek bailout

    Eurozone finance ministers have canceled a crisis meeting planned for Sunday because they need more time — as much as two months — to nail down the details of a second bailout for Greece, officials said Friday.

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    Builders began work on more home-remodeling projects in May. But the increase barely lifted construction spending above its lowest level in more than a decade, a sign that the industry is too weak to provide a boost to the economy.

    Construction spending falls in May

    Builders began work on fewer projects in May, led by steep declines in apartment construction and less spending by state and local governments. Construction spending declined 0.6 percent in May.

  •  
    Volkswagen of America Inc. said Friday its June U.S. sales rose 35.1 percent on strong demand for its Jetta sedan and other models.

    GM, Ford June sales rise as gas prices fall

    DEE-ANN DURBIN,AP Auto WritersTOM KRISHER,AP Auto WritersDETROIT (AP) — Falling gas prices brought truck buyers back to Ford and General Motors showrooms last month. Still, pump prices remained high enough that shoppers snapped up smaller cars as well.GM sales rose 10 percent in June from a year ago. The Detroit car company said it sold 215,358 cars and trucks last month, up from 195,380 a year ago. Ford sales also rose 10 percent.The results indicate the auto industry's slow recovery from the recession is back on track after a brief slump in May.GM said that cheaper gas lured more pickup truck buyers with Chevrolet Silverado sales rising 5 percent and GMC Sierra sales up 8 percent compared with a year earlier. Sales of Ford's F-Series pickups rose 7 percent.Any jump in pickup sales helps the Detroit automakers, which sell more than five times as many pickups as foreign-based brands.Still, GM's sales were led by smaller, more fuel-efficient models like the new Chevrolet Cruze compact. Sales of the Cruze more than doubled the sales of the car it replaced, the lackluster Chevrolet Cobalt. Gas prices averaged $3.68 per gallon in June, cheaper than in May but hardly inexpensive."There is a certain portion of consumers that react to gas prices almost on a daily basis, and they decide what to buy based on those prices," said Jesse Toprak, vice president of industry trends and insights for car pricing site TrueCar.com.GM's small-car and crossover sales also got a boost from earthquake-related shortages of Japanese models that persisted through June.GM is the first major car company to report U.S. sales on Wednesday. Earlier, Volkswagen of America Inc. said its U.S. sales rose 35 percent in June on strong demand for its Jetta midsize sedan and other models. Industry analysts expect overall U.S. sales to rise 13.5 percent from last June.Even with sales rebounding in June, GM backed off a bit from its sales forecast for the year. Don Johnson, vice president of U.S. sales, said he now expects the total sales to be at the low end of the company's previous prediction of 13 million to 13.5 million vehicles.Johnson blamed the change on stubbornly high unemployment, which contributed to the decline in May. Total U.S. sales fell 3.7 percent in May after a string of double-digit monthly increases.Johnson sees the slow recovery continuing through the rest of the year. He said that even with unemployment around 9 percent, 91 percent of the country is still working, and many are driving older cars."There are still people out there looking for a vehicle and in many cases need to replace their vehicles," Johnson said.The average car on the road now is 10.6 years old, according to the Polk research firm.Johnson also said GM plans to roll out new versions of the Silverado and Sierra pickups next year.Automakers expect to sell around 1.1 million cars and trucks in June. That's up 5 percent from May, when parts shortages caused by the March earthquake in Japan, $4-per-gallon gas and a lack of deals caused a slump.But the pace of sales has slowed from the beginning of this year. Like GM, some analysts are starting to question the strength of the recovery. J.D. Power and Associates lowered its full-year sales forecast from 13 million vehicles to 12.9 million, saying the sluggish economy could take a bite out of sales even if car shortages ease by this fall.Shortages are keeping car prices high, and they will likely stay that way through September, J.D. Power said. In the meantime, hiring has slowed, the unemployment rate is creeping up and incomes are flat. Consumer confidence slipped to a seven-month low in June."Things aren't quite as healthy in the current environment as expected earlier this year," said Jeff Schuster, J.D. Power's executive director of global forecasting.

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    Manufacturing activity grew faster in June

    NEW YORK — Manufacturing activity recovered somewhat in June from a sharp slowdown in May, a private trade group said Friday.There were more new orders for goods and employment picked up last month. But the index remains markedly lower than it was earlier this year, suggesting that the recovery is weak. The Institute for Supply Management, a trade group of purchasing executives, said that its index of manufacturing activity rose to 55.3 in June from 53.5 in May, the slowest growth in 20 months.A reading above 50 indicates that the manufacturing sector is expanding.The June increase surprised economists who had been expecting, on average, a further decline to 52, according to a survey by FactSet.The factory sector has been the primary driver of the recovery, growing now for 23 straight months. Large manufacturers of industrial equipment and machinery, such as Caterpillar Inc., have benefited from strong growth overseas and a weaker dollar. Growth had slowed sharply in May, however. High gas prices cut into consumer spending and there was an auto parts shortage stemming from Japan’s March 11 earthquake. But gas prices have come down after spiking to almost $4 a gallon in May, and the price of oil is below $100 a barrel. Economists are also counting on a recovery in auto production to boost second half growth. Deutsche Bank economists estimate that improved auto manufacturing could add as much as a full percentage point to third and fourth quarter growth. The economy grew only 1.9 percent in the January-March period, the government said last week. Most economists have expected growth to be similarly weak in the current April-June period.The ISM, a trade group of purchasing executives based in Tempe, Ariz., compiles its manufacturing index by surveying about 300 purchasing executives across the country.

  •  
    U.S. retail gasoline prices, down 11 percent from a 34-month high on May 4, may keep falling through the Fourth of July weekend as fewer Americans take to the road because of high costs and a slowing economy.

    Gas pump prices may continue to slide after holiday

    U.S. retail gasoline prices, down 11 percent from a 34-month high on May 4, may keep falling through the Fourth of July weekend as fewer Americans take to the road because of high costs and a slowing economy.

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    Auto supplier American Axle to close Detroit plant

    American Axle & Manufacturing Holdings Inc. says it will close its Detroit manufacturing complex as early as February.

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    Palatine's Acura Pharma gets $20M Oxecta payment

    Palatine-based Acura Pharmaceuticals Inc. said Friday it received a $20 million payment from its partner Pfizer Inc. for work on a pain drug that received regulatory approval in June.Its shares climbed 34 cents, or 8.8 percent, to $4.21 in premarket trading.The companies collaborated on the painkiller Oxecta, which received marketing approval on June 17. Oxecta is an immediate-release drug that contains oxycodone, the active ingredient in OxyContin, and it is approved for the treatment of moderate to severe pain.Acura developed technology that is designed to make the drug tamper-resistant, meaning it is more difficult for patients to crush or dissolve the drug so they can use it to get high. It is also intended to irritate the nose if snorted.Acura reported $3.3 million in revenue in 2010, and all of that revenue was related to Oxecta. The company recognized $1.1 million in revenue from an upfront payment on Oxecta, and was reimbursed for $2.2 million in research and development costs.

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    Oil slips below $95 on China production slowdown

    Oil dipped below $95 per barrel Friday after China reported that manufacturing rose at the slowest pace in over two years in June, pointing to a possible slowdown in energy demand.

  •  
    President Barack Obama walks off of Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Thursday, June 30, 2011, after returning from fundraising in Philadelphia.

    Obama picks fight on taxes, big or just symbolic

    President Barack Obama is renewing an old fight with the business community by insisting that $400 billion in tax increases be part of a deficit-reduction package. His proposals have languished on Capitol Hill, repeatedly blocked by Republicans, often with help from Democrats.

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    Lehman plan receives support from major creditors
    NEW YORK — Lehman Brothers is getting broader support for its new bankruptcy plan.The investment bank, which filed for bankruptcy at the height of the financial crisis in 2008, said Friday that creditors holding claims of $100 billion have approved its payment plan. Alternative plans will be put on hold while Lehman moves its proposal forward.The plan still must be approved by a majority of creditors and the federal bankruptcy court.Lehman Brothers Holdings Inc. also said that it has settled derivative claims with seven of the 13 largest banks. Lehman expects settle an additional claim "shortly," resolving $9.6 billion in derivative claims and corresponding guarantee claims for $6.2 billion.

  •  
    The Motorola Mobility smartphone called Moto MT870

    Local man offers seminar on using tech to find a job

    Michael Yublosky of Buffalo Grove is hoping to open your eyes to social media and how it can help you find a job.

Life & Entertainment

  •  
    Maria Shriver has filed for divorce from Arnold Schwarzenegger in Los Angeles Superior Court Friday.

    Shriver files papers to divorce Schwarzenegger

    Six weeks after Arnold Schwarzenegger revealed he had fathered a child out of wedlock, his wife Maria Shriver filed divorce papers Friday to end their marriage of 25 years.

  •  
    Shia LaBeouf, on a press tour in Moscow for "Transformers: Dark of the Moon," said he "doesn't have anything new to contribute" to the franchise.

    Shia LaBeouf: This is my last 'Transformers'

    Shia LaBeouf's days of battling the Decepticons look to be over, with the "Transformers" star saying he has nothing more to offer after three films playing kid-next-door Sam Witwicky.

  •  
    Singer Alicia Keys celebrated the 10th anniversary of her first album, “Songs in A Minor,” by releasing a new edition Tuesday that includes previously unreleased tracks and video footage.

    Keys keeps a song in her heart 10 years later

    Ten years ago, expectations were high for a young singer-songwriter billed as a cross between Lauryn Hill and Whitney Houston. Alicia Keys, who just rereleased special editions of her debut album, has delivered on the all hype.

  •  
    Prince Albert II of Monaco has wed his fiancee Charlene Wittstock.

    Prince Albert of Monaco weds Charlene Wittstock

    Monaco's reigning prince, Albert II, wed Charlene Wittstock of South Africa on Friday in a long-awaited civil ceremony that transformed the one-time Olympic swimmer into the Princess of Monaco. Wittstock succeeds Hollywood beauty Grace Kelly, who wed Albert's father, Prince Rainier III in 1956, had three children with him but died in a car accident in 1982.

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    Prince William and wife Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge meet with people at a youth event in Ottawa, Ontario, on Thursday.

    Prince William, Kate charm Canada on royal visit

    Prince William and Kate will take part in Canada Day celebrations Friday as the royal newlyweds continue a nine-day jaunt through Canada on their first official overseas trip. The country's birthday celebration will include a concert and a speech by the prince. The couple also will hand out flags to newly minted Canadians at a citizenship ceremony earlier in the day.

  •  
    Duke fights back against an alien invasion in “Duke Nukem Forever.”

    ‘Duke Nukem' a mean-spirited mess

    There's a sequence in “Duke Nukem Forever” that's destined to be remembered as one of the all-time low points in the history of video games.

  •  
    JEFF The Brotherhood are Nashville’s hottest noncountry export at the moment.

    We have heard the future and it is JEFF

    JEFF the Brotherhood lay down a righteous slab of sludge mixed with poppy-punk moments sure to resonate this summer on "We are the Champions."

  •  

    Super Handyman: Here are some tips for making a tough job a little easier

    Changing out the wallpaper in a room is as easy as pulling down the old stuff and putting up the new wallpaper. The problem is, it sounds a lot easier than it usually is. Here are a few tried-and-true methods for tackling this chore.

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    The nation’s housing: Be cautious about home warranty policies

    WASHINGTON — The settlement of a major class-action suit is shedding new light on a controversial real estate practice that homebuyers and sellers typically know little about: Fees paid to realty brokers and agents for promoting home warranty policies.

  •  

    About Real Estate: Some household possessions need extra insurance coverage

    A standard homeowner’s insurance policy covers items such as jewelry and antiques, but additional protection may be needed if the items are unusually valuable.

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    Home inspector: Buyer suspicious of home inspection team

    Q. My agent recommended a pair of home inspectors who work together as a team. At first, this seemed like a good idea. But another inspector I talked to argued against having a two-person inspection. He said I’d have trouble getting answers to questions after I buy the home because I’d have to determine who inspected what. How do I decide? Maybe this two-person deal is all about saving the Realtor’s time.

  •  
    Lake Loch Lomond is the jewel of Mundelein's Loch Lomond subdivision. Residents here organize an annual Loch Fest water carnival.

    Neighborhood profile: Loch Lomond, Mundelein

    “Come live in the garden spot of Mundelein” and “Find the home site you've dreamed of in Loch Lomond.” So said the promotional postcards to attract people to the Loch Lomond subdivision when Arthur T. McIntosh developed the area and began selling lots in the 1950s.

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    What’s new in theaters
    This week's openings include Two Pence Shakespeare's production of "As You Like It" and Rebecca Gilman's "The Crowd You're In With" at 16th Street Theater. Also this week, extensions were announced for Writers' Theatre's "The Detective's Wife," The Gift Theatre's "Northwest Highway" and the terrific jukebox musical, "Million Dollar Quartet."

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    On stage: New era for ‘Romeo and Juliet’

    A 19th century sensibility animates First Folio Theatre’s production of Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet,” which director Nick Sandys sets against the backdrop of the romantic era poets Shelley, Byron and Keats.

  •  
    Vince Neil and Mötley Crüe share the bill with Poison and New York Dolls at the First Midwest Bank Amphitheatre in Tinley Park on Friday.

    Weekend picks: Rock on with Mötley Crüe, Poison

    Get out your torn black T-shirts and feather your hair like it's the 1980s when metal bands Mötley Crüe and Poison appear with opening act New York Dolls tonight at the First Midwest Bank Amphitheatre.

  •  
    The Terrace Lounge is a nice warm-weather drinks-and-dining option at the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center.

    Schaumburg's Terrace takes on outdoor lounge set

    Five years after the Renaissance Schaumburg Convention Center opened in 2006, a previously unused outdoor space has been transformed into The Terrace, a casual lounge that's only open when the weather is nice. Since opening in June, the spot has been building a following that extends well beyond hotel guests.

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    “Better Day” highlights Dolly Parton’s periodic desire to make huge social statements.

    Parton’s well-meaning message falters

    Dolly Parton's “Better Day” finds one of music’s most dynamic personalities trying to inject some positivity in the world. But she tries too hard for uplifting messages and grand musical arrangements.

Discuss

  •  

    The Soapbox

    Daily Herald editorial writers weigh in on fireworks safety, fraud in Lake County, a happy ending in DuPage County, discipline in Cook County and much more.

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    We must plan for great, gray suburbs

    Suburbs here and around the nation are graying at a rapid rate, a new report shows. In an era of tight funding, a Daily Herald editorial says, we need to start planning for more and better suburban mass transit, affordable housing and senior-focused physical and mental health facilities.

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    Citizens must get involved
    Jim Slusher's recent article regarding political "gerrymandering" (defined as "dividing election districts so as to gain partisan advantage") is right on.

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    Obama’s economic irrelevance

    If there is a single moment that symbolizes President Obama’s dramatically altered re-election prospects, it was his visit to a Jeep plant in Toledo on June 3.

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    Go Michele

    For a Democrat, it’s too good to be true. Michele Bachmann and Mitt Romney running neck and neck in Iowa. Is the sun shining on Barack Obama or what?

  •  

    Have patience with English learners
    The example I give of that is a simple sentence: I like to read, and yesterday I read a red book about an unusual reed. If you were just trying to learn English, don’t you think that the varied pronunciations and spellings in that sentence would be very confusing? And I won’t even touch on idiomatic phrases!

  •  

    Stick to the important issues
    Rep. Anthony Weiner has resigned. He has disgraced himself and his family. He is a doofus. But his actions did not cost the life of one American son or daughter in the deserts of Iraq or Afghanistan. His actions did not send one American job fleeing to Asia or Mexico.

  •  

    Retired teachers not living luxuriously
    I taught for 40 years and retired at age 65. During that time we scrimped and saved while investing for my retirement as well as putting three kids though college.

  •  

    Underage drinking letter off base
    This is a response to Joe McKeown’s letter titled “Wrong approach to underage drinking?” published on June 28. I’m afraid that by criticizing the police for cracking down on the crime of underage drinking, Joe is in fact taking the wrong approach toward this very serious issue.

  •  

    Roosevelt didn’t end Great Depression
    Democrats claim, with metaphysical certitude, that Democratic President Franklin D. Roosevelt ended the Great Depression with massive federal spending. Let us review the numbers for unemployment association with the relevant years.

  •  

    In short, participate in our democracy
    Independence Day is always a proud day for Americans, but July 4 also marks another milestone in our democracy — the anniversary of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA). FOIA is a federal law signed by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1966 to address the people’s “right to know.”

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    Forest district can find needed funds
    Michael Formento stated that there is no funding in the DuPage Forest Preserve District’s budget to get the Churchill buildings up to code. I thought the citizens of DuPage might be interested to know that in 2007 the state legislature allowed the forest preserve district to set up a “Capital Improvement, Repair or Replacement Fund”

  •  

    Church should learn from local case
    After reading a June 10 article about a priest stealing $410,000 from his church in Joliet, it was interesting to note that the diocese took immediate action. After an internal audit, the priest was removed from his pastoral role and the audit results were turned over to the Dupage County state’s attorney.

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    Weather safety is your responsibility
    You can’t predict the behavior of a tornado. You can’t count on city officials to always predict that behavior and set off the sirens. The best lesson we learned through this experience is that it is important to take responsibility for yourself.

  •  

    Apply cigarette-type warnings to abortion
    The June 21 article, “FDA reveals new graphic cigarette labels,” says that the FDA and other proponents of its newly required, graphic warning labels champion these labels as conveying health risks and deterring smoking. These are laudable goals.Because even proponents of abortion claim to want the practice to be rare (in addition to safe and legal) let us now waste no time in applying similar regulation to abortions. Before receiving an abortion, a wouldn’t-be mother should be shown images of products of abortion. She should see what it does to her child, as well as the risks it poses to her own body. If only there were an image that could convey the anguish she may bring upon herself.Paul Hempel Carol Stream

  •  

    Indifference key to losing liberty
    Three steps to losing liberty: 1. Indifference to gerrymandering. In your editorial of June 26, you rightfully declared that our liberty is at stake if politicians can redraw the boundaries for congressional districts to maximize their own chances for re-election. I’d like to point out that this is only one step of the process.

  •  

    Drivers, don’t let big dogs in front seat
    This issue of text messaging while driving is frustrating enough, but there is another problem: Pet owners who keep large dogs unrestrained in the front passenger seat.

  •  

    Stop deer culling; leave them alone
    Seventy healthy, innocent deer were slaughtered to undergo expensive testing of questionable value for chronic wasting disease by the Illinois Department of Natural Resources. No disease was found. Sleepy Hollow, Dundee Township and the Kane County Forest Preserve District voted for this ruthless culling, claiming a need for “scientific research.”

  •  

    Dissolve NATO and bring spending home
    So let us speed NATO into dissipation. We might then clog the economic drain of wasteful military spending that has helped to deluge this country with an unsustainable national debt these last 30 years.

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    Opportunity in unkempt properties
    I can’t understand why, with high rates of unemployment and foreclosures, the village of Schaumburg is not taking the opportunity to create seasonal employment for the unemployed in Schaumburg.

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    Is there irony in Kevorkian’s death?
    Dr. Jack Kevorkian died in the non-assisted suicide of state of Michigan. Though he suffered painful respiration and kidney problems, he decided not to use his suicide machine on himself.

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    Church leader perfect fit as jury forewoman

    The more we learn about Connie Wilson, the retired Naperville church leader who served as forewomanof the jury that convicted RodBlagojevich, the more there is to like. She brought to the job a perfect blend of Midwestern work ethic, faith, patience and people skills to oversee a jury that, by all accounts, bonded to an unparalleled degree.

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