Daily Archive : Tuesday September 23, 2014

News

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    Newly appointed Archbishop of Chicago, Archbishop Blase Cupich.

    Chicago archbishop to-be won't politicize faith

    Chicago's newly appointed archbishop said Monday he will not politicize religion as other church leaders have done in the past. Speaking at the suburban Chicago parish, Spokane, Washington's Bishop Blase Cupich said as long as parishioners are in church, willing to hear the word of God and open to conversion “that's sufficient for me.”

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    Alex Clifford

    Secret Metra report reveals internal views of patronage allegations

    A report the former Metra chairman promised would clear his name after ex-CEO Alex Clifford accused agency leaders of condoning political pressure raises more questions than it answers. The document the Daily Herald received after a FOIA battle reveals some details about a Mike Madigan ally's push to get a raise and more of the poisonous atmosphere at Metra in 2013.

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    Osama bin Laden’s son-in-law, Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, right, was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison for acting as al-Qaida’s spokesman after the Sept. 11 terror attacks.

    Ex-al-Qaida spokesman gets life prison term in NY

    Osama bin Laden’s son-in-law was sentenced Tuesday to life in prison for acting as al-Qaida’s spokesman after the Sept. 11 terror attacks. Sulaiman Abu Ghaith was sentenced by U.S. District Judge Lewis A. Kaplan, who said he saw “no remorse whatsoever” from the 48-year-old imam.

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    The Harvest Pow Wow at Naper Settlement introduced folks, including our Stephanie Penick, to some new people and ideas.

    Harvest Pow Wow, Judd-A-Thon, bee sting all lead to new experiences

    Our Stephanie Penick uses her weekend excursions in Naperville to learn a little bit about Native American culture -- and how to treat a bee sting.

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    Two months before Omar J. Gonzalez allegedly hopped a White House fence, dashed across the North Lawn and entered the executive mansion, he was arrested in rural Virginia, heavily armed and carrying a map of Washington tucked inside a Bible — with a circle drawn around the White House.

    Accused intruder had targeted White House before

    Two months before Omar J. Gonzalez allegedly hopped a White House fence, dashed across the North Lawn and entered the executive mansion, he was arrested in rural Virginia, heavily armed and carrying a map of Washington tucked inside a Bible — with a circle drawn around the White House.

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    Nurses are trained to use Ebola protective gear by World Health Organization, WHO, workers, in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Six months into the biggest-ever Ebola outbreak, scientists say they’ve learned more about how the potentially lethal virus behaves and how future outbreaks might be stopped.

    Lessons learned 6 months into worst Ebola outbreak

    Six months into the biggest-ever Ebola outbreak, scientists say they know more about how the deadly virus behaves. The first cases were reported in Guinea by the World Health Organization on March 23 — before spreading to Sierra Leone, Liberia and elsewhere. Here’s a look at what scientists have learned so far.

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    A 10-day manhunt for Eric Frein, the survivalist accused of ambushing a Pennsylvania State Police barracks, has narrowed to the rural area where he grew up and his parents still live, but the suspect has managed to elude capture despite the efforts of hundreds of law enforcement officials.

    Tensions high as ambush suspect evades capture

    A 10-day manhunt for the survivalist accused of ambushing a Pennsylvania State Police barracks has narrowed to the rural area where he grew up and his parents still live, but the suspect has managed to elude capture despite the efforts of hundreds of law enforcement officials.

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    Workers carry the body of a man who was killed by a white tiger past its cage at the zoo in New Delhi, India, Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. The white tiger killed the man who climbed over a fence and jumped into the animal’s enclosure Tuesday, a spokesman said.

    Indian zoo: Tiger kills man who climbed into moat

    A white tiger killed a young man who climbed over a fence at the New Delhi zoo and jumped into the animal’s enclosure Tuesday, a spokesman said. Despite repeated warnings that he shouldn’t get too close to the outdoor enclosure, the man eventually climbed over a knee-high fence, through some small hedges, then jumped down 18 feet into a protective moat, said National Zoological Park...

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    Pontiac Township High School teacher Paul Ritter discusses the gravestone project students are involved in at St. Paul Cemetery in Odell.

    Students find history in Odell graveyard

    When Pontiac Township High School teacher Paul Ritter was told seven headstones in St. Paul Catholic Cemetery in Odell were in need of restoration, he knew he could turn it into a project involving several dozen students in different classes. What he didn’t know then was how much the project would intrigue many of those students.

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    Man jailed over Terre Haute park explosives

    Police have arrested a man in connection with two homemade explosives that were found last week in a Terre Haute city park. Police say officers arrested 28-year-old Anthony Tillotson on Monday for a preliminary felony charge of manufacturing a destructive device.

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    Police: Body of missing Wisconsin woman found

    Wausau police say they have found the body of a woman missing for nearly four years. Police Chief Jeff Hardel said Monday that the body of Stephanie Low was found Friday in a shallow grave in the national forest near Wabeno. Low disappeared from her Wausau apartment on Oct. 10, 2010. In 2012, police identified a person of interest in her disappearance.

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    A woman walks past a soldier patrolling at the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France, Tuesday, Sept. 23, 2014. The Islamic State group’s call on Muslims to go after the “filthy French” and other Westerners multiplies already deep security concerns in nations targeting the militant organization.

    New jihad appeal makes policing even harder

    The Islamic State group’s call on Muslims to go after the “filthy French” and other Westerners multiplies already deep security concerns in nations targeting the militant organization. The appeal made public Monday cynically turns all Muslims into the invisible enemy, making intelligence tracking of potential suspects virtually impossible and shining the spotlight of...

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    Frenchman Herve Gourdel, 55, was abducted in Algeria on Monday by a splinter group from al-Qaida’s North African branch. The Jund al-Khilafah, or Soldiers of the Caliphate, said it would kill him unless France halts it airstrikes in Iraq within 24 hours. French forces on Friday joined the U.S. in carrying out airstrikes against extremists who have overrun large areas of Syria and Iraq.

    France won’t stop fight in Iraq despite kidnapping

    Algerian police and soldiers combed the imposing Djura Djura mountains on Tuesday searching for a kidnapped Frenchman that a security official said had been snatched by a former al-Qaida commander.

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    Would U.S. have right of hot pursuit in Syria?

    Secretary of State John Kerry told senators last week that a “right of hot pursuit” could provide a basis for military forces to move across the border between Iraq and Syria to strike at Islamic State militants. But does Kerry’s legal theory — which has little grounding in international law — provide firm precedent for Monday night’s massive U.S.

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    Syria says Washington informed it before strikes

    Syria said Tuesday that Washington informed President Bashar Assad’s government of imminent U.S. airstrikes against the Islamic State group, hours before an American-led military coalition pounded the extremists’ strongholds across northern and eastern Syria.

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    Israel military shoots down Syrian aircraft

    The Israeli military shot down a Syrian fighter jet that infiltrated its airspace over the Golan Heights on Tuesday morning — the first such downing in decades, heightening tensions in the volatile plateau.

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    Illinois man dies after car falls on chest

    A northeastern Illinois man has died from injuries suffered when a car he was working on fell on him, Kankakee County officials said. Rodney Wilhoyt, 53, was underneath a Pontiac Bonneville on Friday when it rolled off its jacks and hit his chest, Kankakee County Coroner Bob Gessner said Monday.

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    Woman killed after vehicle struck by train

    A 66-year-old Christian County woman was killed over the weekend after her vehicle was struck by a train in Taylorville, authorities said. The Christian County Coroner’s office said that Kathleen A. Rhodes died at the scene Sunday.

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    NIU breaks ground on $27M building renovation

    DEKALB — Northern Illinois University held a ceremonial groundbreaking Monday for a $27 million renovation of the facility that houses performing arts, theater and other departments.The Stevens Building opened in 1959 as the Fine Arts Building.

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    Man charged with possessing Springfield pipe bomb

    A 34-year-old man accused of robbing a bank in August has been charged in connection with a pipe bomb found in downtown Springfield in July, authorities said. Bradford Moss was charged Monday with possession of an explosive or incendiary device and attempted theft.

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    Illinois officials clean up Springfield oil leak

    Illinois environmental officials are finishing cleanup at a Springfield park where motor oil leaked into a lagoon. The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency and a cleanup contractor have removed plants in Washington Park and will take soil samples for analysis, state hazardous material specialist George Krebs said.

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    Chicago to host fashion event in October

    Fashion will soon take center stage in Chicago. The city’s Department of Cultural Affairs and Special Events has announced a celebration of Chicago’s fashion industry will be held Oct. 14-19.The event is called Fashion Focus: Chicago’s Fashion Week. It will include a Fashion Town Hall, runway shows at the Chicago Cultural Center and in nearby Millennium Park.

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    Plane from Chicago diverted because of lightning
    Passengers on a plane flying from Chicago to South Carolina that was struck by lightning are safe in Charleston after completing the last 120 miles of their journey by bus. Columbia Metropolitan Airport spokeswoman Kaela Harmon tells local media outlets that United Flight 4613 heading for Charleston was diverted to Columbia late Monday afternoon.

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    Rush demands blacks get share of CTA station jobs

    Illinois Congressman Bobby Rush on Monday demanded that African-Americans get a “35 to 40 percent” share of the jobs being created by plans to reconstruct a Chicago Transit Authority rail station on the city’s South Side.

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    In this image made from video released by the U.S. Navy on Tuesday missiles bound for Syrian Islamic State group targets are launched off a U.S. Navy ship.

    US, Arab allies hit IS strongholds in Syria, Iraq

    Combined U.S.-Arab airstrikes hit Islamic State group military strongholds in Syria and Iraq as a simultaneous U.S. strike attacked an al-Qaida cell of hardened veterans with “significant explosives skills” said to be plotting attacks on the U.S. and Western interests, officials said.

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    The Grand Victoria Casino in Elgin is celebrating its 20th anniversary next month. Casino officials said a recent renovation of the casino floor aimed for a brighter, more modern and spacious feel.

    Grand Victoria to offer specials for its 20th birthday

    Grand Victoria Casino in Elgin is pulling out all the stops to celebrate its 20th anniversary next month, casino officials said. “It's two decades,” said casino marketing manager Marilou Pilman. “For a business to say they've been around that long, I think we realized that's something that we definitely should celebrate.” The casino will be giving away $62,000 every...

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    Dick Pond on Randall Road in Carpentersville will close Oct. 31.

    Dick Pond in Carpentersville to close Oct. 31

    It's been the go-to store for area runners for the past seven years. But it won't be for much longer. Dick Pond in Carpentersville is set to close its doors for good at the end of October.

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    Energy company reaches out to Illinois residents

    A Texas energy company that wants to build a 1,100-mile pipeline that would cross west-central Illinois plans to answer residents’ questions this week. Energy Transfers Partners representatives will meet with residents about the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline on Wednesday at Lincoln Land Community College campus in Litchfield and Thursday at the American Legion post in Jacksonville, the...

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    Indian Prairie Unit District 204 board member Cathy Piehl, center, asks whether the school board could delay installation of partial air conditioning systems at 19 elementary schools if the state education formula changes and decreases the amount the district would receive. Money to install air conditioners was approved in the district's budget, but leaders are watching what will happen with proposed education funding changes at the state level.

    Dist. 204 'committed' to air conditioning

    Board members in Indian Prairie Unit District 204 approved a budget Monday night that provides money to install partial air conditioning at 19 elementary schools where students and teachers suffered through sweaty conditions a year ago. But proposed changes to education funding could jeopardize the plan. “We would have to significantly cut or find a new revenue source to run the district...

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    Look who was one of the Bears’ stars again! Bears cornerback Kyle Fuller intercepts a pass in the end zone intended for New York Jets wide receiver David Nelson (86) in the third quarter last night in New Jersey.

    Dawn Patrol: Bears slog out a win; motorcyclist killed outside college

    Bears slog out 27-19 win; Niles motorcyclist killed near Oakton College; missing Glen Ellyn woman found safe; Woodridge child abduction attempt made; Barrington Hills debates horse boarding plan.

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    A man plays the video gambling machines at Rosati’s in Lakemoor. Libertyville officials may delay a decision on whether to allow video gambling at eligible businesses in the community.

    Libertyville asked to delay video gambling decision

    Libertyville may take a short breather before reconsidering video gambling in town. A decision whether to allow it is on the village board agenda for Tuesday, but it could be postponed to give officials more time to hear from the public. “A lot of people are concerned and want us to look at it further before we make a decision,” Mayor Terry Weppler said.

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    Ivy Hill Elementary School is one of several Arlington Heights District 25 schools dealing with larger-than-anticipated enrollments this year. District officials are planning five community meetings over the next month to discuss with parents their options for dealing with crowded buildings.

    District 25 plans community meetings to discuss growing enrollment

    Arlington Heights Elementary District 25 will hold five community meetings at four of its schools over the next month to discuss what officials said is an overcrowding issue and hear from parents about possible ways to deal with growing enrollment. Officials have said all of the district’s school are “at capacity.” Enrollment at four district schools — Ivy Hill,...

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    St. Charles backs study of rafting, fountains for Fox River

    St. Charles Active River Task Force members received praise and tentative financial support to study white water rafting, kayaking, fountains, floating botanical gardens for the city's portion of the Fox River Monday night. “We don’t have any plans for anything at this point other than to see what we can do to leverage the river,” said John Rabchuk, a spokesman for the task...

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    Angie Lee, seated to the right of the giant soccer ball, and classmates from Metea Valley High School will be participating in the first Big Ball Soccer Tournament Saturday at Players Indoor Sports in Naperville. The tournament raises money for research on the disease Angie has had since she was 15 months old, spinal muscular atrophy, or SMA.

    Naperville ‘Big Ball’ soccer tourney to fight spinal muscular disease

    Event organizers for the first Big Ball Soccer Tournament in Naperville are practicing their soccer puns, if not so much their soccer skills, in advance of a new event scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 27, that will raise money to fight spinal muscular atrophy. “Things are literally rolling along right now,” said Sue Miranda, one of the coordinators of the event. “People just take a...

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    Deb Perryman’s love for the environment started at an early age and has become her life’s passion. The Elgin High School teacher is among 15 educators named to Earth Echo’s Learning Education and Advisory Panel. Perryman was also named the 2014 Environmental Educator of the Year by the Environmental Education Association of Illinois.

    Elgin High’s Perryman named to national science panel

    Elgin High School environmental science teacher Deb Perryman is among 15 educators named to Earth Echo’s Learning Education and Advisory Panel. Earth Echo, launched by Philippe Cousteau Jr., is an international nonprofit organization dedicated to using adventure to enhance environmental education and empower young people to help restore the planet.

Sports

Business

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    Associated Press Jacob “Jack” Lew, U.S. Treasury secretary,

    Lew’s anti-inversion crackdown takes toll on tax-cut deals

    Treasury Secretary Jacob J. Lew’s crackdown on inversions will get an immediate test as eight U.S. companies with pending deals decide whether to proceed -- and other companies contemplating a foreign address now have to think twice.That’s exactly what Lew had in mind. “This action will significantly diminish the ability of inverted companies to escape U.S. taxation,” Lew told reporters on a conference call yesterday.

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    Gallagher acquires The Benfield Group

    Itasca-based Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. has acquired health care consulting firm The Benfield Group. Terms of the transaction were not disclosed

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    Z Capital appoints executive

    The Lake Forest-based private equity firm Z Capital Partners, LLC has named William McBeath managing director and operating partner.Prior to joining Z Capital, McBeath was president and chief operating officer for CityCenter, which includes ARIA Resort & Casino,

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    CF Industries, Yara in talks on possible merger

    Deerfield-based CF Industries is in preliminary talks with Norway’s Yara International about a possible merger that would create a mammoth player in the fertilizer industry. The combined company would have a market capitalization of more than $26 billion, second only to Potash Corp. of Canada. However, it would have annual sales of about $20 billion, almost three times that of Potash.

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    Part of the HealthCare,gov Website in Washington. The government’s own watchdogs say they tried to hack into HealthCare.gov earlier this year and found what they termed a critical vulnerability.

    Government hackers try to crack HealthCare.gov

    The government’s own watchdogs tried to hack into HealthCare.gov earlier this year and found what they termed a critical vulnerability — but also came away with respect for some of the health insurance site’s security features. Those are among the conclusions of a report being released Tuesday by the Health and Human Services Department inspector general, who focuses on health care fraud.

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    Billionaires bet on cement as housing recovers

    Billionaires Carlos Slim and Antonio del Valle are doubling down on the Mexican cement industry, wagering a demographic boom and government subsidies will sustain a homebuilding recovery after last year’s collapse. Elementia SAB, the Mexican cement maker backed by Slim and del Valle, agreed Sept. 19 to pay Lafarge SA $225 million for the 47 percent stake of cement maker Cementos Fortaleza it didn’t already own.

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    Warren Buffett

    Buffett’s Netjets gets approval for China charters

    A joint venture between Warren Buffett’s NetJets Inc. and two Chinese investment companies won approval to fly private charters in China as it seeks to tap rising wealth in the world’s second-largest economy.NetJets Business Aviation Ltd. is the first global private aviation company to begin operating in China, the company said in a statement today after announcing it won a license from the Civil Aviation Administration of China.Air travel demand in Asia is projected to expand 5.7 percent in the four years through 2017, with routes within or connected to China the largest driver, according to an International Air Transport Association study last year. Potential demand for private charters remains unclear as the government presses ahead with an anti-corruption campaign that’s hurt sales of high-end liquor and other luxury products.The crackdown may have some impact at the beginning and won’t affect long-term demand as China’s market matures and the economy continues to grow, NetJets Business Aviation Vice Chairman Eric Wong said on a conference call.The company is operating two planes out of a base in the southern city of Zhuhai, near Hong Kong and the gambling hub Macau, according to Wong. The private jets operator hasn’t decided how quickly to add planes to its fleet, he said.NetJets Business Aviation is a joint venture between the Columbus, Ohio-based NetJets, Hony Jinsi Investment Management (Beijing) Ltd. and Fung Investments.To contact Bloomberg News staff for this story: Tian Chen in Beijing at tchen259bloomberg.net To contact the editors responsible for this story: Nicholas Wadhams at nwadhamsbloomberg.net Suresh Seshadri

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    Pedestrians pass a Tesco shop in London.

    The rise and fall of U.K. grocer that ‘owned the world’

    Berkshire Hathaway Inc. Vice Chairman Charles Munger recently summed up the past seven years of Tesco Plc, Britain’s biggest grocer, in a beat. “Tesco owned the world,” said Munger, whose firm last disclosed a 3.7 percent stake in the company. And “one day, it stopped working so well.” Between the late 1990s and 2007, when the shares hit a record and former Chief Executive Officer Terry Leahy, was knighted, the company was considered a titan of British corporate success.

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    Richard Branson said almost 800 would-be space tourists signed up for $250,000 flights with his Virgin Galactic venture have been understanding about glitches that caused commercial services to be delayed until 2015.

    Branson says space tourists patient about Virgin Galactic delays

    Richard Branson said almost 800 would-be space tourists signed up for $250,000 flights with his Virgin Galactic venture have been understanding about glitches that caused commercial services to be delayed until 2015. Pushback from clients who include physicist Stephen Hawking, singer Sarah Brightman and X-Men director Bryan Singer has amounted to “almost none whatsoever,” the U.K. billionaire told Bloomberg Television. “Everyone’s been very patient. They realize that it’s rocket science. They want to make sure that we don’t hurry them up there, and they want to come back.”

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    Google to build $773 million center in Dutch hub

    Google Inc., the world’s largest Internet-search provider, plans to spend about $773 million over the next four years in building a data center in the Netherlands for its European operations. “We know this area well, there is available land and there is a favorable climate for us,” Francois Sterin, director of global infrastructure at Google, said at a news conference today in Eemshaven, 133 miles northwest of Amsterdam. Google will employ about 150 permanent workers once the job is completed in the area, Sterin said.

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    Aurora meat supplier CUTS 340 jobs at Shanghai unit
    Bloomberg News OSI Group LLC, the Autora-based U.S. meat supplier that sold out-of-date products in China, will cut 340 jobs at a Shanghai unit where output hasn’t resumed since the government halted operations.OSI has notified the affected workers at its Shanghai Husi Food unit, it said today in a statement on its website. The closely company said a small number of staff are being kept on to assist with government probes.“Over the past two months, Shanghai Husi has experienced significant financial and customer losses and the authorities’ investigations are still ongoing,” OSI said. “It is very unlikely that production will be resumed soon.” Some of the meat ended up overseas’ at Oak Brook-based McDonald’s outlets and at other fast food chains.Most of the workers have been on paid leave since July, when production was suspended after the discovery it was selling repackaged chicken and beef past its sell-by date. Six Shanghai Husi employees were arrested by China’s Public Security Bureau last month amid investigations into activities at the plant. Yum! Brands Inc., owner of KFC and Pizza Hut, terminated its relationship with OSI because of the probe.

Life & Entertainment

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    Novelist Stephen King’s time-travel novel about the Kennedy assassination is being adapted as a small-screen miniseries. Streaming service Hulu said Monday that the nine-hour series, “11/22/63,” will include the author and J.J. Abrams as executive producers.

    Hulu to make Stephen King’s ‘11/22/63’ into a miniseries

    Stephen King’s time-travel novel about the Kennedy assassination is being adapted as a small-screen miniseries. Streaming service Hulu said Monday that the nine-hour series, titled “11/22/63” after King’s book, includes the author and J.J. Abrams as executive producers. King said in a statement that if any of his works cried out for “long-form, event TV programming,” then “11/22/63” is it.

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    An all-star lineup of musicians including Gregg Allman, Aaron Neville, Taj Mahal, Eric Church, Michael McDonald, Patty Griffin and more will salute Mavis Staples during the “I’ll Take You There - Celebrating 75 Years of Mavis Staples” event on Wednesday, Nov. 19, in Chicago.

    Mavis Staples to get star-powered musical tribute

    Mavis Staples is getting the tribute treatment. An all-star lineup of musicians including Gregg Allman, Aaron Neville, Taj Mahal, Eric Church, Michael McDonald, Patty Griffin and more will salute Staples during the I’ll Take You There - Celebrating 75 Years of Mavis Staples tribute concert Nov. 19 in Chicago. Staples has had one of music’s most powerful careers as a member of The Staple Singers and as a solo artist, connecting the gospel music of her upbringing to social issues and causes. Resulting soul music anthems like “I’ll Take You There” helped define the civil rights era.

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    New Kids On The Block's Jordan Knight, right, and Backstreet Boys' Nick Carter headline the House of Blues in Chicago on Friday and Saturday, Sept. 26-27, in support of their new album, “Nick & Knight.”

    Nick Carter, Jordan Knight to play two HOB shows this weekend

    Jordan Knight says being in a duo with fellow boy band veteran Nick Carter is less stressful than being part of New Kids on the Block. "We have a little more freedom, you know, to just explore and do something different than what would be expected,” Knight said. The duo headline Chicago's House of Blues on Friday and Saturday, Sept. 26-27, in support of their new album, "Nick & Knight."

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    At 77, Merle Haggard still tours around the country about two weeks each month and recently bought a new tour bus, a sign that he’s not interested in retirement from the road. His band, the Strangers, now includes his wife, Theresa, and 21-year-old son Ben, as well as band leader Norman Hamlett, who has been with Haggard since the 1960s.

    Country singer Merle Haggard still on the road

    Even Merle Haggard gets nervous about stepping onto a stage when the audience is filled with songwriters, record label executives and fellow artists. “Well, it’s glorious but it’s also tough because all the pressure is on you,” Haggard said after recently playing two sold-out nights at the Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Tennessee. “You’ve got all those people out there that call you a legend and an icon and all that stuff. You kinda gotta prove it.” But judging from the cheering and ovations, Haggard — who helped create the twangy electrified Bakersfield Sound in country music — still knows how to impress a crowd.

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    In “Good Cheap Eats,” Jessica Fisher shares family-friendly dinners that cost $10 or less to make.

    From the food editor: Mother of six shares recipes for family dinners under $10

    When Jessica Fisher’s new book “Good Cheap Eats” landed on my desk recently, I was intrigued. In her book, Fisher, a wife and mother of six who coupon-clipped her way out of debt, shares 200 recipes that come together for $10 or less. Seriously $10. Her trick isn’t coupons. It’s smart shopping.

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    Julie Beckwith of Crete came in first place with her Rustic Margherita Pizza at a recent cooking contest sponsored by NatureSweet Glorys Tomatoes.

    Grilled Rustic Margherita Pizza with Pan-Roasted Tomato Pesto
    Grilled Rustic Margherita Pizza with Pan-Roasted Tomato Pesto won first place in a recent Nature Sweet tomato cooking contest in Schaumburg

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    Scott Bakula is Special Agent Dwayne Pride and CCH Pounder plays Dr. Loretta Wade in “NCIS: New Orleans,” premiering on Tuesday, Sept. 23, on CBS.

    New ‘NCIS’ spinoff sets up shop in New Orleans

    The newest members of the successful “NCIS” TV franchise understand the importance of their family roots. But the stars and producers of “NCIS: New Orleans” also are betting that the crime drama’s setting, one of America’s most distinctive cities, will exert its own magic with viewers. The series debuts at 8 p.m. Tuesday on CBS, drafting on TV’s top-rated drama “NCIS” that airs at 7 p.m.

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    Tony Bennett and Lady Gaga’s “Cheek to Cheek” is only the second full album that Bennett has recorded with another artist.

    Bennett, Gaga have special chemistry on new CD

    Tony Bennett has never forgotten the boost he got when Frank Sinatra declared him “the best singer in the whole business.” Now it’s Bennett’s turn to grant his imprimatur to another Italian-American singer from New York: Stefani Germanotta, better known as Lady Gaga. Bennett and Gaga just released “Cheek to Cheek” — only the second full album that Bennett has done with another singer in his nearly 70-year recording career.

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    Korean-style pork sliders topped with pickled vegetables will score points with guests at football tailgate parties.

    Small sliders score big points with tailgaters

    Tired of burgers and hotdogs at your tailgate parties? Change up the game plan with Korean-inspired pork sliders or chicken sliders bathed in a fiery tropical sauce. With sliders on your team you'll score big points with football party guests.

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    Dan Rich, the 2013 Daily Herald Cook of the Week Challenge winner, prepares pizza dough during a recent grilling event at Hearth & Home in Mount Prospect.

    Dan’s Game-time Grilled Pizza
    Dan's Grilled Pizza

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    Spice-Rubbed Pork Loin BLT Sliders with Dijon Remoulade
    Spice-Rubbed Pork Loin BLT Sliders with Dijon Remoulade can be roasted in the oven before the game and the meat warmed on a grill at your tailgate party.

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    Bits of celery add crunch to Buffalo wings-inspired Spicy Chicken Sliders.

    Spicy Chicken Sliders with Blue Cheese Dressing
    Spicy Chicken Sliders get their game on with a creamy Blue Cheese Dressing.

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    Grilled chicken thighs take a dip in a fiery, tropical sauce before hitting the buns. The 2012 Cook of the Week Challenge winner Michael Pennisi says these plantain-topped Pirate Chicken Sliders are perfect football fare.

    Pirate Chicken Sliders
    The 2012 Cook of the Week Challenge winner Michael Pennisi says these plantain-topped Pirate Chicken Sliders are perfect football fare.

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    Sweet Potato Coconut Stew is a warm bowl of autumnal flavor. Enjoy a bowl with a slice of avocado toast. Or don’t.

    Soupalooza: Coconut milk, spinach add sweetness to sweet potato stew

    M. Eileen Brown recently found a website that has fast become her favorite: food52.com. It’s filled with recipes, tips and ideas from home cooks, sort of a crowdsourced recipe collective. On the site, she found a recipe for Roasted Sweet Potato Coconut Stew, which is perfect for this time of year.

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    Roasted sweet potatoes add sweetness and texture to a chunky fall soup. Or is it a stew?

    Roasted Sweet Potato Coconut Stew
    Sweet potatoes hit the oven before they mingle with coconut milk and spinach in an autumnal soup.

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    Dolce&Gabbana looks to Spain for influences in its women’s spring-summer 2015 collection, unveiled during Milan Fashion Week Sunday.

    Dolce&Gabbana harness Spanish passion

    Dolce&Gabbana continue their survey of conquests of their beloved Sicily, rendering into ready-to-wear fashion cultural traces left behind by these sometimes ill-fated adventures. After incorporating Norman traces for winter looks, it was on to Spain’s influence on the oft-conquered Sicily for next summer’s womenswear looks previewed Sunday, the fifth day of Milan Fashion Week.

Discuss

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    Bishop Blase Cupich, of Spokane, Washington, will head the Archdiocese of Chicago come November.

    Editorial: A welcome, with hope, for new spiritual leader

    A Daily Herald editorial welcomes the new archbishop of Chicago with hope fo his success as a unifying spiritual leader with a positive influence on all citizens, Catholic and non-Catholic alike.

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    Violation of Ray Rice’s civil rights?
    A Wheaton letter to the editor: The NFL and Ray Rice domestic violence issue is far from over. The termination of his contract by the Ravens, the indefinite suspension from football by the NFL and the suspension of his endorsement contract by Nike others opens a whole new perspective on the issue.

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    How does Obama get away with this?
    An Elmhurst letter to the editor: For the life of me, I cannot but help to observe that President Obama has twice violated his oath. Twice he has taken an “oath of office” by “swearing” — hand on Bible — to “protect and defend the Constitution of the United States — so help me God.”

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    Voters don’t really want to hear the dirt
    A Roselle letter to the editor: Once again, another election season is here and once again the campaigns are like usual — he said, she said. The election commissions complain because there’s always low voter turnout, but yet the way Illinois politicians campaign, it don’t give voters the incentive to go out and vote.

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    In choosing U-46 superintendent ...
    An Elgin letter to the editor: Elgin School District U46 board members, in your search for a new superintendent, please be mindful of the following: • No relatives of the superintendent should ever be allowed to work in the district.

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    The myth about public schools

    Columnist Catherine Rampell:

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