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Daily Archive : Tuesday September 30, 2014

News

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    Passengers and airport employees at O'Hare International Airport. The FAA said Tuesday that data through midnight showed air traffic flow at O'Hare International Airport was at more than 80 percent of last Monday. It was about 90 percent at Midway International Airport.

    O'Hare, Midway airports nearing normal capacity

    The FAA said Tuesday morning that data through midnight showed air traffic flow at O'Hare International Airport was at more than 80 percent of last Monday. It was about 90 percent at Midway International Airport. A Naperville man is charged in federal court with setting a fire Friday at an Aurora control center and then trying to kill himself. The damage caused more than 2,000 flights to be...

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    Police: 1 child hurt, school evacuated in Kentucky

    One child was injured and a high school was evacuated after a report of weapons seen on the campus in Louisville, police said Tuesday. Spokeswoman Alicia Smiley says the child sustained non-life threatening injuries and that a parent was with the child. Smiley would not say if the child was a student or describe the nature of the injuries.

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    U-46 parents, students criticize new grading system

    Several Elgin Area School District U-46 parents and students complained at Monday night’s school board meeting about a new standards-based grading system as being too subjective. Parent Colleen Ottens called the rollout and implementation of this new grading system “an unmitigated disaster.” “As an educator, I understand the intent of this new system; however, it is a...

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    Elgin woman dies after head-on crash

    A 20-year-old Elgin woman died following a head-on crash Tuesday morning, police said. Cynthia Vega, who was pronounced dead at Presence St. Joseph’s Hospital in Elgin, was driving a 2005 Nissan Altima westbound on Highland Avenue at about 7 a.m. when it traveled over the centerline near Lyle Avenue, Elgin Police Cmdr. Dan O’Shea said in a news release.

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    A collection jar sits in the office of dentist Meagan Heilman of Park Avenue Dental Professionals in Libertyville. Heilman and her two staff members, Kim Foster of Libertyville and Judy Scharringhausen of Wauconda, will participate in a two-week dental mission to Kenya in October with a group called Oasis for Orphans.

    Libertyville dentist and her staff heading to Kenya on mission trip to help orphans

    As a local dentist, Meagan Heilman of Libertyville regularly helps children with their dental hygiene, but it’s not every day that she gets to have the same impact on children half a world away. In October, she and two fellow staff members Park Avenue Dental Professionals in Libertyville will do just that.

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    The reward for surviving last winter's frigid temperatures and record snowfall, several states are learning, is drastic price increases for road salt — and that's if they can even get it.

    Road salt supply low, demand high as winter looms

    The reward for surviving last winter's frigid temperatures and record snowfall, several states are learning, is drastic price increases for road salt — and that's if they can even get it. Replenishing stockpiles is proving challenging, especially for some Midwestern states, after salt supplies were depleted to tame icy roads last winter. And price increases of at least 20 percent have been...

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    The Metropolis Performing Arts Centre opened in 2000 and has counted on significant village funding since.

    Metropolis' total village funding could exceed $5 million

    If Arlington Heights approves Metropolis's request for $450,000, it will push the village's financial involvement with the performing arts center to more than $5 million in the last decade, according to village documents. But “that level of funding couldn't continue forever,” the village's finance director said. “This isn't something we could continue without finding an...

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    Carpentersville police are investigating the death of a woman after she was found Monday night suffering from apparent stab wounds in the 100 block of South Lincoln Avenue.

    Carpentersville woman dies after apparent stabbing

    A Carpentersville woman died Monday night after apparently being stabbed in her home, police said. Police were called by a neighbor at about 9:54 p.m. to the 100 block of South Lincoln Avenue, a news release stated. The neighbor heard a disturbance and went to investigate, and found the middle-aged woman suffering from apparent stab wounds, police said.

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    Des Plaines officials are planning to spend millions next year on infrastructure upgrades and other expenses, but they won't increase taxes to do it.

    Des Plaines plans to spend more, but not raise taxes

    Des Plaines officials are planning to spend millions next year on infrastructure upgrades and other expenses, but won't increase taxes to do it. The proposed $153 million city budget for fiscal year 2015 was presented to the city council Monday night by City Manager Mike Bartholomew.

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    A student protester rests next to a defaced cutout of Hong Kong’s Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying at one of their protest sites around the government headquarters, Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, in Hong Kong. Pro-democracy protesters in Hong Kong set a Wednesday deadline for the city’s unpopular Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying to meet their demands for genuine democracy and for him to step down as leader of Hong Kong, after spending another night blocking streets in an unprecedented show of civil disobedience.

    Hong Kong leader rejects protesters’ demands

    Pro-democracy protesters demanded that Hong Kong’s top leader meet with them, threatening wider actions if he did not, after he said Tuesday that China would not budge in its decision to limit voting reforms in the Asian financial hub. Chief Executive Leung Chun-ying’s rejection of the student demands dashed hopes for a quick resolution of the five-day standoff that has blocked city...

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    Secret Service Director Julia Pierson acknowledged on Tuesday the agency fell short in executing its plan to protect the White House when a man with a knife entered the mansion and ran through half the ground floor before being subdued.

    SSecret Service head takes heat for White House breach

    Facing blistering criticism from Congress, Secret Service Director Julia Pierson acknowledged on Tuesday the agency fell short in executing its plan to protect the White House when a man with a knife entered the mansion and ran through half the ground floor before being subdued. “It’s unacceptable,” Pierson told lawmakers.

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    Virginia Tech student Morgan Harrington, 20, of Roanoke County, Va. Police say the investigation into the case of missing University of Virginia student Hannah Graham has turned up a lead in Harrington’s 2009 disappearance and death.

    Police: Forensic evidence links two UVA cases

    They both were walking alone, separated from their friends late at night on or near the University of Virginia campus. One was found dead nearly five years ago. The other is still missing. And now police believe they have found a link between the 2009 slaying of Morgan Harrington and the Sept. 13 disappearance of Hannah Graham.

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    Jarrod Tutko was charged on Monday, Sept. 29, 2014, with homicide in the death of his 9-year-old son, whose decomposing body was found in his Harrisburg home.

    Parents charged in death of son found in home

    HARRISBURG, Pa. — A central Pennsylvania man and woman have been charged with homicide in the death of their 9-year-old son, whose decomposing body was found in their Harrisburg home during the summer.Dauphin County District Attorney Ed Marsico said Monday that Jarrod Tutko Jr. was in what he called a horrible condition at the time of his death in July.

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    Alton Nolen of Moore, 30, has been charged with first-degree murder in the beheading of a Vaughan Foods plant worker Colleen Hufford.

    Oklahoma man charged with murder in beheading

    An Oklahoma man was charged Tuesday with first-degree murder in the gruesome beheading of a Vaughan Foods worker, authorities said. Cleveland County prosecutor Greg Mashburn said 30-year-old Alton Nolen faces murder and assault charges.

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    Earnest Satterwhite spent some of the last moments of his life fleeing from officers who wanted to pull the 68-year-old man over on suspicion of drunken driving. Seconds after he pulled into a driveway off a dirt road in Edgefield County, an officer opened fire.

    Officer kills man through car door in his driveway

    Ernest Satterwhite was a laid-back former mechanic with a habit of ignoring police officers who tried to pull him over — an act of defiance that ultimately got him killed. The 68-year-old black great-grandfather was shot to death after a slow-speed chase as he parked in his own driveway, by a 25-year-old white police officer who repeatedly fired through the driver’s side door.

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    Secret Service Director Julia Pierson said Tuesday the front door to the White House now locks automatically in a security breach.

    White House front door now locks automatically

    Secret Service Director Julia Pierson says the front door to the White House now locks automatically in a security breach. Pierson told a House panel that the switch to automatic locks at the White House’s north door was made after an Army veteran jumped the fence on Sept. 19 and made his way into the interior of the building through two unlocked doors.

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    The perimeter fence sits in front of the White House fence on the North Lawn along Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington.

    Secret Service allowed to shoot White House intruders

    Secret Service Director Julia Pierson says officers and agents are allowed to use “lethal force” to stop someone from getting into the White House.

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    Deputy Governor of Kirkuk province Rakkan Ismail Ali says at least 60,000 Arab and Turkmen displaced by fighting have flooded into Kirkuk since June, and more than a million have fled to northern Iraq this year. The influx is prompting major security concerns.

    Iraqi Arabs claim persecution by Kurds

    Life has been filled with hardship for the tens of thousands of Iraqi Arabs who escaped one opponent only to face another. Displaced Arabs who fled to oil-rich Kirkuk say tensions with the local Kurdish population have surged amid fears that Arabs are linked to the Islamic State militant group that has seized a third of the country.

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    A firefighter walks by a mountain lodge covered by ash and damaged by volcanic rocks during a rescue operation for missing hikers trapped in the summit area of the Mount Ontake in central Japan. Some survivors of the eruption made a split-second decision to hide behind big rocks or escaped into the lodges that dot the mountain’s slopes.

    Luck, instinct determined fates of volcano hikers

    Huge boulders falling from the sky. Billowing gray smoke that cast total darkness over the mountain. Volcanic ash piling on the ground and fumes filling the air.

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    Ozgur Simsek was among 32 truck drivers held hostage by the Islamic State group earlier this year. For many foreigners, being caught by the group’s fanatical fighters would mean months of uncertainty, torture and, eventually, a gruesome death. For Simsek and his colleagues, captivity would last just over three weeks. Their trucks were confiscated, but no one was harmed and no ransom was paid.

    Hostage tale suggests IS wary of upsetting Turkey

    For many foreigners, being caught by the Islamic State;s fanatical fighters would mean months of uncertainty, torture and, eventually, a gruesome death. For 32 Turkish truck drivers, captivity would last just over three weeks. Their trucks were confiscated, but no one was harmed and no ransom was paid. The episode paints a picture of a militant group unusually careful not to anger Turkey’s...

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    Democrat Michael Mason, left, and incumbent Republican Peter Roskam, right, are candidates for the 6th Congressional District in the 2014 general election.

    Political newcomer challenging Roskam for U.S. Congress seat

    Democrat Michael Mason of Naperville is challenging incumbent Peter Roskam of Wheaton for the 6th Congressional District seat in the Nov. 4 election. Both say they want to help lead the country's economic recovery, but they differ on how to do it.

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    No injuries reported in Naperville fire late Monday

    By Lee Filas


    No injuries were reported from a Naperville fire in the 500 block of Cassin Road late Monday. Authorities said flames were found in the garage of the two-story home at 11:25 p.m. Everyne inside the home were able to get out before fire trucks arrived on the scene.

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    Afghanistan and the United States signed a long-awaited security pact on Tuesday that will allow U.S. forces to remain in the country past the end of year.

    Afghanistan, US sign long-awaited security pact

    Afghanistan and the United States signed a security pact on Tuesday to allow U.S. forces to remain in the country past the end of year, ending a year of uncertainty over the fate of foreign troops supporting Afghanis as they take over responsibility for the country’s security.

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    Police discovered the body of Arkansas real estate agent Beverly Carter early Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, in a shallow grave at a concrete company, about 25 miles northeast of Little Rock, Ark. Carter had been missing since Thursday.

    Police: Body of Arkansas real estate agent found

    Police discovered the body of a missing Arkansas real estate agent in a shallow grave at a concrete company early Tuesday, and a man has been jailed on suspicion of kidnapping and killing her, authorities said.

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    A male monarch butterfly is seen through the container. Janet Giesen is keeping him in after he emerged from the chrysalis in her garage. Giesen hopes her raising and releasing of 17 monarch butterflies makes some sort of impact on the world around her. (AP Photo/Daily Chronicle, Danielle Guerra) MANDATORY CREDIT

    Sycamore woman helping butterflies

    Janet Giesen hopes her raising and releasing of 17 monarch butterflies makes some sort of impact on the world around her. Giesen, of Sycamore, started raising the butterflies in July and tracking their growth and movements. An avid lover of nature and keeper of prairie plants around her home, she’s a big believer in preserving nature.

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    Chicago libraries accept immigrant licenses as ID

    The Chicago Public Library has begun accepting special immigrant driver’s licenses as identification for obtaining a library card. Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced the policy Monday, saying it’s “part of being an immigrant-friendly city.” The mayor says more Chicagoans now will be able to take advantage of the resources available at the city’s 80 library...

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    State WIC switching to skim, 1 percent milk

    An Illinois nutrition program is tweaking the diet of the low income residents it helps feed. In a news release, the Illinois Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children says that beginning Wednesday, many of those who receive food vouchers will be offered skim milk or one percent milk instead of whole milk in an effort to improve their health.

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    Illinois coyote heals after getting stuck in car

    A coyote is recuperating at a northeastern Illinois wildlife rehab center after being hit by a car and getting stuck in its grille. The (Waukegan) News-Sun reports the coyote has been treated for three fractures in his legs since the incident last week. A train conductor pulled into a Waukegan station with the animal wedged in the front of his car.

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    Springfield man gets 12 years for hiding gun

    A Springfield man has been sentenced to 12 years in prison after admitting he tried to hide a gun used in a fatal shooting. The State Journal-Register reports 23-year-old Richard Lawuary pleaded guilty in August to obstructing justice and unlawful possession of a weapon by a felon. A jury had been selected and two prosecution witnesses had testified at his trial.

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    Officials say ridesharing giant Uber will create 420 jobs in the next two years in a major expansion of its Chicago regional headquarters.

    Ridesharing company Uber to expand in Chicago

    Officials say ridesharing giant Uber will create 420 jobs in the next two years in a major expansion of its Chicago regional headquarters. Gov. Pat Quinn joined in the announcement Monday. The Democrat says his veto action last month killed legislation that would have set up statewide restrictions on Uber and kept it from expanding.

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    Emanuel pushes ban on asking about criminal record

    Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel wants to expand a state law that prevents employers from asking job seekers about their criminal records before offering them an interview. Illinois Gov. Pat Quinn signed a bill this year to “ban the box.” That’s a reference to the box on many employment applications that asks if an applicant has been arrested or convicted of a crime.

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    Quad City International Airport gets $500,ooo grant

    The U.S. Department of Transportation has awarded Quad City International Airport a $500,000 grant to grow new air service between Northwest Illinois and Washington, D.C. Democratic U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin announced the grant on Monday.

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    Dawn Patrol: Lombard man killed by wheel; Elgin cop fired over posts

    Lombard man killed by wheel in Wisconsin identified. Attorney: Man charged in FAA fire made ‘tragic mistake.’ Elgin officer fired after FB posts on Ferguson, MLK day. Female jockey punches another at Arlington Park. Motorcyclist seriously injured in Elk Grove crash. Barrington Hills police officer on leave. Construction underway at Wrigley.

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    Using a curtain to hide a large sculpture of Jesus on the cross, the Holy Family Catholic Church in Inverness transforms its altar to host last week’s Rosh Hashana service for the Beth Tikvah congregation in nearby Hoffman Estates. This is the 10th year the church has hosted services for the Jewish High Holy Days.

    Jews observe High Holy Days in Catholic church

    In a show of cooperation between Christians and Jews, Holy Family Church in Inverness will host the Beth Tikvah congregation of Hoffman Estates for Yom Kippur. The trickiest part is hiding the 2,000-pound cross with Jesus.

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    Patrick Bond, the temporary Barrington Hills village attorney, listens during the board’s meeting Monday night at village hall.

    Barrington Hills moves to fill village attorney vacancy

    The Barrington Hills village board approved a plan Monday night to find a new village attorney to replace its counsel of more than 30 years, which resigned at the request of the village president last month. The final selection will be presented at the board meeting on Oct. 27.

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    This immature yellow-crowned night heron, discovered at Fermilab in Batavia, caused a stir among local birders in early September.

    Why birding is the best hobby

    Not a bird watcher, you say? Well, our Jeff Reiter is out to convince you that birding is the hobby for you. Bird sightings happen anywhere and everywhere, whether you're looking out your kitchen window or are motivated to travel to an exotic locale to add species to your life list, he says. If he's right, Reiter just may persuade you to pick up a pair of binoculars.

Sports

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    The NFL said Tuesday that Kansas City Chiefs safety Husain Abdullah should not have been penalized for unsportsmanlike conduct when he dropped to his knees in prayer after an interception.

    NFL says Abdullah should not have been penalized

    The NFL said Tuesday that Kansas City Chiefs safety Husain Abdullah should not have been penalized for unsportsmanlike conduct when he dropped to his knees in prayer after an interception. Spokesman Michael Signora wrote in an email Tuesday that “the officiating mechanic in this situation is not to flag a player who goes to the ground as part of religious expression, and as a result, there should have been no penalty on the play.”

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    Halfway home, breaking down playoff possibilities

    It seems like I say this every year about this time — and here I go again. I can’t believe how fast time is flying. Last weekend (at halftime to be precise) marked the official halfway point of the high school football regular season.

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    While Bears quarterback Jay Cutler tries to figure out what went wrong against the Packers, the Bears find themselves tied in the NFC North with Green Bay and Minnesota.

    For now, NFC North still up for grabs

    The Detroit Lions lead the NFC North Division, but there is three-way tie for second place between the Packers, Vikings and Bears. But Mike North wants to know how long this logjam will last.

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    Dundee-Crown celebrates a point against Jacobs Thursday in Algonquin.

    Images: Prep Sports Images of the Week
    See some of the best images of the week in high school sports. Daily Herald photographers this week covered girls swimming and diving, girls tennis, cross country, and more.

Business

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    A taxi speeds by a neon-lit Walgreens in the French Quarter of New Orleans. Walgreen booked a $239 million loss in its fiscal fourth quarter after swallowing a huge accounting charge from its Alliance Boots acquisition, but the drugstore chain’s results still met Wall Street expectations.

    Walgreen posts 4Q loss on Alliance Boots charge

    Walgreen booked a $239 million loss in its fiscal fourth quarter after swallowing a huge accounting charge from its Alliance Boots acquisition, but the drugstore chain’s results still met Wall Street expectations. Walgreen Co. said Tuesday that it recorded a non-cash loss of $866 million in the quarter that ended Aug. 31 because it decided to exercise early its option to buy the remaining stake in Alliance Boots that it did not already own.

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    A scene from Sony Corp.’s 2000 movie “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.” Netflix is taking on the sequel “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: The Green Legend.”

    Netflix taking on sequel to ‘Crouching Tiger'

    Netflix Inc. and Weinstein Co. will release a sequel to the Oscar-winning “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon” next year, marking the subscription video service’s first foray into feature film production. The movie will be released globally in selected Imax Corp. theaters and simultaneously on Netflix’s streaming service on Aug. 28 next year, said Rich Gelfond, chief executive officer of Imax, in an interview. The martial arts picture will be the first of several major films to be backed by Netflix, he said.

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    Douglas De Leo hands customers a bag of produce at the Kalamazoo Farmers Market in Kalamazoo, Mich. U.S. consumer confidence dropped in September after hitting the highest level in nearly seven years in August.

    U.S. consumer confidence slides in September

    U.S. consumer confidence dropped in September after hitting the highest level in nearly seven years in August. The Conference Board reported Tuesday that its confidence index fell to 86.0, the lowest point since a May reading of 82.2. It was the first decline after four months of gains and followed a revised 93.4 in August, which had been the highest reading since October 2007, two months before the Great Recession officially began.

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    The maker of the world’s top-selling erectile dysfunction drug on Tuesday will begin airing the first Viagra TV commercial that targets the less-obvious sufferers of the sexual condition: women.

    Viagra ads target women for first time

    The maker of the world’s top-selling erectile dysfunction drug on Tuesday will begin airing the first Viagra TV commercial that targets the less-obvious sufferers of the sexual condition: women. In the new 60-second ad, a middle-aged woman reclining on a bed in a tropical setting addresses the problems couples encounter when a man is impotent.

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    California Gov. Jerry Brown has indicated that he is likely to sign a bill imposing the nation’s first statewide ban on single-use plastic bags as a way to address litter.

    Gov. Brown says he’s likely to sign plastic bag ban

    California Gov. Jerry Brown has indicated that he is likely to sign a bill imposing the nation’s first statewide ban on single-use plastic bags as a way to address litter. SB270 is one of the last major bills pending Tuesday, the deadline for the governor to sign or veto hundreds of bills.

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    China’s phone regulator said Tuesday it has approved Apple Inc.’s iPhone 6 for use on Chinese networks after the company promised never to allow other governments access to users’ information. Apple said sales start on Oct. 17.

    China approves iPhone 6 after security assurances

    China’s phone regulator has approved the iPhone 6 for sale after Apple Inc. promised never to allow other governments access to users’ information. Tuesday’s announcement reflected Chinese unease about the reliability of foreign communications technology following disclosures about widespread U.S. government eavesdropping.

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    TiVo Inc., a maker of digital video recorders, is introducing a mobile application for users to stream TV content on their Android smartphones and tablets, adding to a similar service it offers on Apple Inc. devices.

    Tivo introduces Android app to stream shows on mobile devices

    TiVo Inc., a maker of digital video recorders, is introducing a mobile application for users to stream TV content on their Android smartphones and tablets, adding to a similar service it offers on Apple Inc. devices. The new app, which is initially being introduced in the U.S., lets consumers with devices using Google Inc.’s operating software connect with their TiVo set-top box at home to watch live shows,

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    Attorney Michael Evans, left, listens in his office in Denver, as his client Brandon Coats talks about the Colorado Court of Appeals ruling that upheld Coats being fired from his job after testing positive for the use of medical marijuana.

    Colorado high court considers pot firing case

    Pot may be legal in Colorado, but you can still be fired for using it. Brandon Coats, a quadriplegic medical marijuana patient who was fired by the Dish Network after failing a drug test more than four years ago, says he still can’t find steady work because employers are wary of his off-duty smoking.

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    News Corp. To buy real-estate business move in $950 million deal

    News Corp., the newspaper publisher controlled by Rupert Murdoch, agreed to buy U.S. online real- estate business Move Inc. for $950 million, net of the target’s cash balance.

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    EBay Inc., the world’s biggest online marketplace, said it is separating from its payments arm PayPal, in a move that will create two separate publicly companies.

    EBay to separate from payments unit PayPal
    EBay Inc., the world’s biggest online marketplace, said it is separating from its payments arm PayPal, in a move that will create two separate publicly companies. EBay and PayPal will become independent companies in 2015, subject to customary conditions, the San Jose, California-based company said in a statement. Creating two standalone businesses will allow each to capitalize on their respective growth opportunities and is the best way to create sustainable shareholder value, the company said.

Life & Entertainment

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    Just be there for friend in abusive relationship

    Her friend recently announced her engagement to abusive boyfriend. She can't be happy for the couple knowing their history, so how does she react? Carolyn Hax says be honest and be there.

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    Acclaimed violinist and Indiana University graduate Joshua Bell will try playing in a train station again, though this time he hopes it’s more conducive to making music.

    Famed violinist plays do-over at DC train station

    Seven years ago, violinist Joshua Bell performed incognito for tips in a Washington subway station, but almost no one stopped to listen. The subway performance was an experiment with The Washington Post to see if anyone would notice some of the world’s great music during their rush to work. On Tuesday, Bell will play at Washington's Union Station, but this time for an actual audience.

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    Singer Anita Baker is being sued by her former lawyer for more than a year’s worth of work and expenses.

    Lawyer says singer Anita Baker owes him money

    A lawyer who represented Anita Baker against allegations she failed to pay for work done on her Detroit-area home is suing the singer, saying she owes him money.

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    Psychologist Anthony Kidman, left, and his daughter, actress Nicole Kidman, arrive at the Palm Springs International Film Festival in Palm Springs, Calif. Actress Nicole Kidman on Tuesday broke her public silence since the death of her father more than two weeks ago by sharing her heartbreak and thanking well-wishers for their comforting thoughts and prayers.

    Nicole Kidman reveals heartbreak at father’s death

    Nicole Kidman revealed she was heartbroken over the death of her father this month and thanked well-wishers for their comforting thoughts and prayers. “We would just like to thank everyone for their love and prayers over these past couple of weeks,” the actress and her singer husband Keith Urban said in a joint statement posted Tuesday on Facebook.

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    Wal-Mart says actor-comedian Tracy Morgan and other people in a vehicle struck from behind by a company truck on a New Jersey highway in June weren’t wearing seatbelts. Wal-Mart’s filing was made Monday in federal court in response to a lawsuit Morgan filed in July.

    Attorney: ‘Appalling’ for Wal-Mart to blame Morgan

    An attorney representing actor-comedian Tracy Morgan says it’s “appalling” that Wal-Mart calls Morgan partly to blame for injuries he suffered in a New Jersey highway accident involving one of the company’s trucks.

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    Mount Prospect native and former “American Idol” winner Lee DeWyze will perform an acoustic set in Evanston this weekend.

    Music notes: Lee DeWyze plays Evanston's SPACE Friday

    Former Mount Prospect resident and "American Idol" winner Lee DeWyze will play a special acoustic show that includes songs from his new album at SPACE in Evanston Friday, while the Nick Moss Band brings its blues attack to the Prairie Center for the Arts in Schaumburg Friday.

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    America’s Baking and Sweet Show comes back to Schaumburg Nov. 14 to 16.

    From the food editor: Attention bakers! Enter our home baking challenge

    The Daily Herald Media Group invited home bakers to enter our Home Baking Challenge. Food Editor Deborah Pankey also talks with a Bartlett woman who's heading to Nashville next month to compete in the Pillsbury Bake-Off.

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    Dorie Greenspan’s new cookbook, “Baking Chez Moi.”

    Granola Cake
    Dorie Greenspan's Granola Cake should be on your baking bucket list this fall.

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    Wrapped in foil then baked in the oven, beets become a delicious, nutritious side dish.

    Baked Beets
    Wrapped in foil then baked in the oven, beets become a delicious, nutritious side dish.

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    The many different varieties and colors of beets adds to the fun of growing and cooking with them.

    Eat right, live well: You can’t beat the benefits of beets

    There are more than 60 types of sugar but I bet you rarely think of beets as a sugar source. Yet beets are higher in natural sugar than carrots and even corn. Beets are a vibrant purple-red root vegetable that add beautiful color to our plates and important nutrients to our diet. A 3-ounce serving of beets contains 8 grams of carbohydrate and about 35 calories.

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    Chris Kaag, paralyzed by a rare disorder, and his wife, Gretchen, get training from scuba instructor Bill Monsam. The condition of Kaag and others in a small study improved greatly after just five days of scuba diving.

    Does scuba diving help people with paralysis?

    When Chris Kaag boarded a flight to the Cayman Islands for a scuba diving trip, his legs stayed straight when he wanted them to bend and his feet flopped inward. He used two canes to move forward and cursed his feet dragging behind. Put simply, maneuvering the plane’s narrow aisle was, as usual, “not a pretty sight,” says Kaag, a Marine Corps veteran and business owner who has a rare disorder that makes his lower body increasingly unresponsive to his mind’s commands.

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    Lucinda Williams just released the two-CD set “Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone.”

    As usual, Lucinda Williams digs deep

    “Have compassion for everyone you meet,” goes the opening line on the new album from Lucinda Williams, who struggles to follow her own counsel on the rest of the two-CD set, "Down Where the Spirit Meets the Bone."

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    “Baking Chez Moi” by Dorie Greenspan

    New Dorie Greenspan cookbook covers what you should bake next

    The annoying thing about Dorie Greenspan is that no matter how much you don’t like to bake, aren’t good at baking, don’t even want to bake ... If you listen to her long enough, you’ll find yourself hankering to get your hands into some flour. Her can-do attitude is that infectious. Her latest cookbook, “Baking Chez Moi” fuels that passion with dozens of recipes for home cooks who lack the time, tolerance and skill for anything but simple home baking.

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    Chef Tom Birmingham oversees the kitchen staff at Ruth Lake Country Club, a private club in Hinsdale.

    Chef du Jour: Country club chef joins ranks of exclusive culinary society

    Tom Birmingham recalls as early as sixth and seventh grades the chance to cook for his family, which was no easy feat, considering he had five brothers and sisters. “I should have known back then that I would be getting into the business as a profession, but it took me a year out of high school for me to realize my calling.” Birmingham has forged a successful culinary career since graduating from culinary school at Joliet Junior College and now is the executive chef at Ruth Lake Country Club in Hinsdale.

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    Ahi tuna gets a quick sear in a red-hot pan and then chilled before chef Tom Birmingham serves it with wasabi cream and a gingery dressing at Ruth Lake Country Club in Hinsdale.

    Mesquite-Seared Ahi Tuna
    Chef Tom Birmingham at Ruth Lake Country Club in Hinsdale created wasabi-spiked creme fraiche for his Mesquite-Seared Tuna.

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    Four jumbo shrimp are tucked into crepe-like wraps at Liu Brothers Asian Bistro in St. Charles.

    St. Charles’ Liu Brothers Asian Bistro a family affair

    Unlike some restaurants, Liu Brothers Asian Bistro doesn’t make hungry customers hunt through menus that are unwieldy and often confusing. Rather, this sensible St. Charles eatery, open since early February, gets right down to business. Beijing-trained chef-owners Kevin and David Liu offer diners a focused bill of fare via a tidy, well-thought-out menu.

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    CCH Pounder stars as Dr. Loretta Wade and Scott Bakula plays Special Agent Dwayne Pride in “NCIS: New Orleans.”

    CCH Pounder continues strong TV streak with ‘NCIS: New Orleans’

    Actress CCH Pounder's eclectic TV resume includes stints on FX's "The Shield" and "Sons of Anarchy." She builds on a past filled with strong characters by playing a coroner in CBS's new drama "NCIS: New Orleans," a spinoff from the top-rated "NCIS" — hailed by its network as the most-watched show in the world.

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    Thor, left, Iron man and Black Widow are just a few of the figure available for the new “Disney Infinity 2.0: Marvel Super Heroes” game.

    Avengers assemble in ‘Disney Infinity 2.0’

    For kids today, there’s no escaping The Walt Disney Co. The “Infinity” project is Disney’s attempt to link all its characters in one shared video-game world. This year, the company adds its lucrative comic-book properties to the fray with “Disney Infinity 2.0: Marvel Super Heroes.” The starter kit includes figures of Iron Man, Thor and Black Widow, as well as a clear plastic model of Avengers Tower.

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    Blake Shelton, “Bringing Back the Sunshine”

    Blake Shelton the adult shines on new LP

    Blake Shelton’s public persona — a mix of smart-aleck whimsy and thoughtful sensitivity — has made him country music’s most ubiquitous male star. A full-grown man with a boyish cheekiness, his easy likability has made him a consummate award-show host, a high-profile judge on “The Voice” and a constant presence in ads across print, the web and TV.

Discuss

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    Michael Vucic

    Editorial: School case a wake-up call on reporting sex-abuse suspicions

    A Daily Herald editorial says the Gavin District 37 sex abuse case must be a wake-up call for teachers and their responsibility to report abuse concerns.

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    A change in the name of NFL?
    An Arlington Heights letter to the editor: Given the Ray Rice and Adrian Peterson domestic and child abuse charges, the National Football League might want to consider a name change to the National Felons League.

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    Dold is proof that true moderates exist
    A Buffalo Grove letter to the editor: What does it mean to be “moderate” anymore? I feel that the majority of people I talk to don’t know much about the election. We have our doorbell rung every so often by a scared looking high-school kid handing out pamphlets for a candidate, but that brief interaction doesn’t tell us much. We see more and more signs popping up in people’s yards for a state representative or a congressman, but that doesn’t tell us much either.

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    Look to Oberweis’ charity work, too
    A Barrington letter to the editor: A little-known fact about Jim Oberweis, U.S. Senate candidate in Illinois, is his work with kids in Illinois. His Oberweis Foundation sponsors activities and helps kids and adults in difficult economic circumstances, which led to his directorship of the Northern Illinois Food Bank. He sponsored and directed chess tournaments for kids to encourage them to think analytically.

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    Honor Gandhi by promoting peace
    A letter to the editor: Oct. 2 marks the International Day of Nonviolence and the birthday of the patriarch of pacifism, Mahatma Gandhi. The latter advocated religious, racial and ethnic reconciliation, human rights, civil rights, humane vegetarianism and reverence for all life.

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    A plan to undermine the middle class
    A Crystal Lake letter to the editor: Pivotal election issues are unions and collective bargaining to represent liable livelihoods and safe working conditions to restore the middle class and the economy with public service.

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    If you’re rich, Rauner is your man
    A Naperville letter to the editor: Republican Bruce Rauner was recently interviewed by the Daily Herald editorial board regarding his positions on some very important issues. However, when asked about how he plans to deliver on his promise to freeze property taxes, Rauner said he doesn’t have a plan other than he will “collaborate” on specifics with lawmakers if he is elected.

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    Introspection time for evangelicals

    Columnist Michael Gerson: It is fair to say that some cultural views traditionally held by evangelicals are in retreat. Whatever the (likely dim) future of political libertarianism, moral libertarianism has been on the rise.

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    Conservatives’ short memories on school protests

    Columnist Ruben Navarrette: What’s really at the heart of that story from 2010 where five students at Live Oak High School in Morgan Hill, Calif., conspired to wear T-shirts bearing the American flag? Was it patriotism? Or petulance?

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