What others are writing about COVID-19

  • People relax in marked circles for proper social distancing at Domino Park in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn during the current coronavirus outbreak, Sunday, May 17, 2020, in New York.

    People relax in marked circles for proper social distancing at Domino Park in the Williamsburg neighborhood of Brooklyn during the current coronavirus outbreak, Sunday, May 17, 2020, in New York. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens)

 
Daily Herald Report
Updated 5/18/2020 11:32 AM

The girl who died twice

It's a parent's worst nightmare. Your otherwise healthy 12-year-old starts feeling sick and then quickly goes into cardiac failure. Other organs begin failing. Doctors start talking about a transplant. The Washington Post tells the story of Juliet Daly, one of the first known patients in the United States to be diagnosed with multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children caused by coronavirus.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

'I can't turn my brain off': PTSD and burnout threaten medical workers

The heroes are hurting. Recent studies show soaring rates of anxiety, depression and insomnia among health care workers treating COVDI-19 patients. "As the pandemic intensity seems to fade, so does the adrenaline. What's left are the emotions of dealing with the trauma and stress of the many patients we cared for," Dr. Mark Rosenberg said. The New York Times explores the story.

How Anthony Fauci became the face of the pandemic -- and its merch

There are Dr. Fauci T-shirts, mugs, masks and memes. Vox explains how -- and why -- the soft-spoken director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases became the face of the pandemic.

Where Chronic Health Conditions and Coronavirus Could Collide

This interactive map from The New York Times shows how parts of the United States that have not seen major outbreaks of COVID-19 could still be at risk of serious illness because a significant portion of the population has underlying conditions, such as diabetes, obesity and high blood pressure. You can search by county here.

Airplanes don't make you sick. Really.

In this op-ed Joseph Allen, an assistant professor of exposure assessment science at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, explains how the ventilation systems on airplanes control airborne bacteria and viruses. He also outlines additional precautions travelers, airlines and airports should take during the pandemic to stop the spread of infection. Read his piece in The Washington Post.

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