Good News Sunday: Barrington HS students honored for feeding hungry

  • Palatine resident Ryan Gable is donating the use of his recreational vehicle to a medical professional who is concerned about spreading the coronavirus to family members after returning home from caring for patients with the virus.

      Palatine resident Ryan Gable is donating the use of his recreational vehicle to a medical professional who is concerned about spreading the coronavirus to family members after returning home from caring for patients with the virus. Mark Welsh | Staff Photographer

  • Vernon Hills Police Sgt. Andy Jones reads the story "One Day in the Eucalyptus, Eucalyptus Tree" as a bedtime story for kids.

    Vernon Hills Police Sgt. Andy Jones reads the story "One Day in the Eucalyptus, Eucalyptus Tree" as a bedtime story for kids. Vimeo Video Screenshot

 
Updated 4/4/2020 11:52 PM

This is Good News Sunday, a compilation of some of the more upbeat and inspiring stories published by the Daily Herald during the previous week:

Two Barrington High School students have received accolades from the largest youth recognition program in the country based exclusively on volunteer community service.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Sophomore Carson Pazdan was one of two state honorees for this year's Prudential Spirit of Community Awards. Junior Morgan Larson was named a distinguished finalist by the program created in 1995 by Prudential and the National Association of Secondary School Principals.

Carson was recognized for raising at least $150,000 and collecting thousands of pounds of food over the past nine years to feed the hungry by publishing a children's cookbook and conducting other fundraising activities.

Morgan is founder and operator of the nonprofit "60010 Feeds Kids," which has raised about $20,000 and at least 80,000 meals for 2,600 children across the world experiencing food insecurity.

For the full story, click here.

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'No task is ever really too small'

As fear of the coronavirus spread and a stay-at-home order took effect, St. Charles resident Rebecca Groshek recognized the pandemic's impact would be a heavy burden for some in her community.

Those who live alone might be feeling especially isolated. Others may have lost their jobs and be struggling to make ends meet. Seniors and residents with underlying health conditions could be afraid to venture outside for groceries and other necessities.

The concept started with a post on the Nextdoor social networking app.

"There was such an outpouring of people who raised their hands and said, 'Let me know. I want to help,'" Groshek said. "So I started collecting emails."

More than 20 volunteers are now involved with the initiative, which provides dog walking, resume reviews and grocery and medicine pickups.

"No task is ever really too small," Groshek said.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

For the full story, click here.

Vernon Hills cops read books to kids

With day-to-day interactions with the public on hold, Vernon Hills police have found another way to stay connected with families.

Every night at 7 p.m., a video of an officer reading a children's book is posted on the department's Facebook page in a feature called "Bedtime Stories."

"It just kind of popped in my head," said Officer Lindsey Laas, who got the idea after taking a home video of her 4-year old son reading a book.

"I figured anything that we can do to interact with the community would be welcomed."

For the full story, click here.

Palatine man offers use of RV to medical worker

Palatine resident Ryan Gable says he's willing to donate use of his recreational vehicle to a Northwest suburban medical professional who is concerned about spreading COVID-19 at home after treating patients on the job.

Gable said he wants to do something useful with the 36-foot-long Winnebago Vista LX instead of letting it sit idle during the pandemic. He hopes other RV owners will do the same.

He came up with the idea after seeing news reports about health care workers treating coronavirus patients, then sleeping in tents or cars rather than going home.

"It sickens you," Gable said. "They're fighting our battle. And to sleep in a garage is just ... you almost start crying."

The offer is targeted to Northwest suburban nurses and doctors. Anyone interested must have a driveway large enough for the RV.

Contact Gable at ryangable@startingpointrealty.com.

For the full story, click here.

Donations give boost to hospital employees

An Elmhurst catering company usually would be preparing jumbo lump crabcakes, braised beef short ribs and other Insta-worthy entrees for wedding receptions.

But with formal occasions on pause, Market Table's chefs are using their culinary chops to help sustain hospital workers fighting the pandemic.

Market Table is donating meals twice a week to Elmhurst Hospital employees for the foreseeable future. Office Manager Christine Falkenberg said there's no end date to the company's mission to feed "those who are on the front lines doing all that they can to be keep everybody healthy."

The meals are part of an outpouring of good will for a hospital system treating dozens of patients who have the virus.

For the full story, click here.

• Good News Sunday will run each weekend. Visit dailyherald.com/newsletters to sign up for our Good News Sunday newsletter.

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