Hoffman Estates breakfast honors King's legacy with call to action

  • Hanover Park Trustee Herb Porter gives the keynote address Monday during the community breakfast in Hoffman Estates.

      Hanover Park Trustee Herb Porter gives the keynote address Monday during the community breakfast in Hoffman Estates. Mark Welsh | Staff Photographer

  • Geneva Wells, 7, of Hampshire holds her hand over her heart Monday as she recites the Pledge of Allegiance during the 18th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Community Breakfast in Hoffman Estates.

      Geneva Wells, 7, of Hampshire holds her hand over her heart Monday as she recites the Pledge of Allegiance during the 18th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Community Breakfast in Hoffman Estates. Mark Welsh | Staff Photographer

  • Pamela Gibson of Elgin rejoices as the Destiny Church Praise Team sings Monday during the 18th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Community Breakfast in Hoffman Estates.

      Pamela Gibson of Elgin rejoices as the Destiny Church Praise Team sings Monday during the 18th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Community Breakfast in Hoffman Estates. Mark Welsh | Staff Photographer

  • guests including Gloria Covington of Barrington listen to the keynote address Monday during the 18th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Community Breakfast in Hoffman Estates.

      guests including Gloria Covington of Barrington listen to the keynote address Monday during the 18th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Community Breakfast in Hoffman Estates. Mark Welsh | Staff Photographer

 
Daily Herald report
Updated 1/20/2020 5:13 PM

Hoffman Estates community leaders and residents gathered with neighbors from surrounding communities Monday to honor the legacy of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

The Hoffman Estates Cultural Awareness Commission's 18th annual Martin Luther King Jr. Breakfast, themed "Rising Together: Our Path to the Mountaintop," featured a keynote address by Hanover Park Trustee Herb Porter.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

In his address, Porter spoke of the mountaintop -- a reference to King's "I've Been to the Mountaintop" speech delivered the day before his assassination -- as not a destination, but a stop on a journey.

He also encouraged his fellow leaders in local government to do more to eliminate our culture's "pervasive" implicit biases that create barriers for minorities and other disadvantaged people in society.

"In all areas of our culture, we must be vigilant in our efforts to eradicate all biases from our daily discourse," he said. "Let's join together and be the change as we march toward the promised land."

Porter later described King as a "champion of love."

"Not of a romanticized love, but a pragmatic, practical love, that made him stand up against the powers of the day and demand freedom, equality and opportunity for those so long denied these basic elements of the American dream."

0 Comments
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 
Article Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.