Audubon, Adler partner in restoration initiative in Libertyville

 
 
Updated 4/23/2019 7:12 AM
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  • The village-owned David Adler Music & Arts Center on North Milwaukee Avenue in Libertyville. The Lake County Audubon Society is partnering with the center to remove invasive species and replace them with native plantings on the grounds of the estate.

    The village-owned David Adler Music & Arts Center on North Milwaukee Avenue in Libertyville. The Lake County Audubon Society is partnering with the center to remove invasive species and replace them with native plantings on the grounds of the estate. Daily Herald File Photo

A multipurpose restoration initiative between the Lake County Audubon Society and the David Adler Music & Arts Center in Libertyville is taking shape.

Initiated by the Audubon Society, the planned multiyear collaboration will feature a series of events and activities to educate homeowners and upgrade the grounds of the famous architect's home on the north side of town.

Volunteers on Saturday will pick up winter debris and participate in environmentally themed Earth Day activities. More comprehensive efforts to remove and replace invasive species with native plants are envisioned.

The educational aspect of the partnership will begin from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Sunday with "Planting Small Native Gardens," the first of a series of free classes at the village-owned Adler Center, 1700 N. Milwaukee Ave.

"Kicking out Invasive Plans and Planting Good Guys" will follow on May 5, and a two-hour workshop on leaf identification is planned for July.

Adler also is offering a free exhibit celebrating Earth Day through April 27. "Conservation Conversation" is a visual interpretation of the environment, ecological issues and sustainable living. Visit www.adlercenter.org to learn more or to register for the classes.

For Audubon, the long-term focus is to educate homeowners on the value of creating native gardens for flood control and other reasons.

"We're trying to engage the public to change their properties. That's the whole idea of this," said Paul Geiselhart, project developer. A blog creativebirdscaping.wordpress.com has been created to outline events and information and chronicle efforts.

Restoring the beauty of the village-owned Adler estate is the other goal.

"You save money, and it brings about good things," said Glen Moss, Audubon vice president and member of the village's arts commission. He presented the original concept to both parties.

The 240-acre Adler property was gifted to the village in the 1950s on the condition the house and grounds be maintained and developed as a community cultural and recreation center. Adjoining Adler Park and Adler Park School were created on the property.

The village is responsible for maintenance, but the operation of the Adler house and 11 remaining acres falls to a nonprofit organization. A long-range master plan for the home and property is being developed.

"It's getting there. It's taking awhile," Adler Executive Director Amy Williams said. "The big news for sure is how excited Audubon is to help us."

Audubon has received commitments for $8,500 for native plants.

Restoration will include the work of an Eagle Scout candidate and be part of the Birdscaping/Plants for Birds program Audubon has conducted in Lake County for seven years.

The first section of work is expected to initially focus along North Milwaukee Avenue, with plantings in fall.

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