Mount Prospect leaders update residents on airport, flooding issues

  • Mount Prospect Public Works Director Sean Dorsey discusses flooding issues on the village's northeast side during a meeting with residents Tuesday at the Burning Bush Community Center.

      Mount Prospect Public Works Director Sean Dorsey discusses flooding issues on the village's northeast side during a meeting with residents Tuesday at the Burning Bush Community Center. Steve Zalusky | Staff Photographer

 
Updated 3/13/2019 7:47 PM

Mount Prospect village leaders addressed residents' concerns over potential changes at Chicago Executive Airport and flooding in their neighborhood, during a special committee-of-the-whole meeting Tuesday at the Burning Bush Community Center.

Mayor Arlene Juracek reassured neighbors that the village has their back regarding Chicago Executive Airport, where earlier talk of a possible runway extension sparked concern over added jet noise. Officials at the Wheeling airport announced last week that they will no longer consider runway expansion as part of their next master plan.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

"I think a huge victory that we have here is that the (airport) finally recognizes that Mount Prospect is a legitimate stakeholder as that term is defined by the (Federal Aviation Administration)," Juracek said.

She also noted her airport credentials as a member of the stakeholder group participating in Chicago Executive's master planning process and as chairman of the O'Hare Noise Compatibility Commission.

"I know enough not to have the wool pulled over my eyes," she said. "And I know enough to ask the right questions."

But despite the victory on expansion, residents still voiced fears about the airport and its responsiveness. Maureen Stoskopf said she would like to find out how to get noise monitoring devices installed in the northeast side neighborhood.

"On a Friday afternoon, it's get out of Dodge. There are corporate jets leaving minutes apart continuously throughout the day," she said. "I can't hear myself on the phone. Once the summer comes, that's it. You cannot enjoy being outside."

by signing up you agree to our terms of service
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

On the flooding issue, Public Works Director Sean Dorsey shared plans to build a new pumping station at Levee 37 along the Des Plaines River with four times the pumping capacity of what is currently available at the village's two pumping stations.

The improvements are needed, he said, because flooding and ponding still occur during heavy rains when the river is high. The state is providing $3 million in funding for the project.

Dorsey said the village also will work with the River Trails Park District to provide additional stormwater detention and drainage at Burning Bush Trails Park and, possibly, at Aspen Trails Park.

The cost to the village would be $10 million to $12 million. Dorsey said no funds are available in the village's flood control construction fund, but other sources could be tapped, including sales taxes.

0 Comments
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 
Article Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.