Grayslake abandoning plans to trap coyotes

  • The village of Grayslake abandoning plans to hire trappers to thin the local coyote population. Instead, the village will focus on teaching residents how to coexist with the wild animals.

    The village of Grayslake abandoning plans to hire trappers to thin the local coyote population. Instead, the village will focus on teaching residents how to coexist with the wild animals. Daily Herald File Photo

 
 
Updated 10/31/2017 5:47 PM

Grayslake is no longer considering hiring trappers to thin the local coyote population, instead hoping to teach residents ways to coexist with the animals.

Police Chief Phil Perlini posted on the village's Facebook page last week that his department was contacting trappers "to control and/or curb the area coyote population."

 

But on Tuesday he said he knew a lot less about coyotes then than he does now.

"When I posted that very first Facebook post, I didn't know anything about coyotes. All I knew was that I needed to call a trapper to see if there was anything they could do," Perlini said. "The thought of humanely trapping the coyotes and humanely relocating them was a possibility in my head."

Local wildlife experts have since told him that trapping would not be effective because other coyotes would likely take the place of those removed.

Instead of trapping, Perlini said he hopes to organize a public question-and-answer session with an animal expert so residents could find out about how to live with coyotes and keep them from harming anyone.

"There is no eliminating this problem; there's only coexisting," Perlini said.

So far, Perlini has not found an expert willing to commit to such a session. If it doesn't come together, the village might instead put out basic information about how residents can safely deal with coyotes.

One tip from wildlife experts is to carry a boat horn that can be used to scare coyotes away, Perlini said. If a coyote isn't frightened or appears aggressive, residents should call police, he said.

Coyotes killed two small dogs over a month ago in separate attacks near Grayslake and Hainesville, Perlini said. He said small pets shouldn't be left alone outside and residents should eliminate any food sources on their property, like garbage or bird food that might be eaten by the small animals coyotes hunt.

The village is seeking information from residents on where they've spotted coyotes. To report a coyote sighting, call (847) 223-8515 or use the "Request For Service" page on the village website.

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