Bill to ban bumping of ticketed passengers introduced in Congress

  • Legislation in Congress banning bumping passengers was inspired by the dragging of David Dao from a United Airlines flight.

    Legislation in Congress banning bumping passengers was inspired by the dragging of David Dao from a United Airlines flight. Audra D. Bridges, via AP

 
 
Updated 4/25/2017 6:58 PM

Legislation intended to give passengers more rights after a man was dragged from an overbooked United Airlines flight at O'Hare International Airport was introduced Tuesday in Congress.

"A lot of people were shocked to see there is such a thing as involuntary bumping," said U.S. Rep. Jan Schakowsky of Evanston, who is sponsoring the bill with fellow Democratic U.S. Rep. Raja Krishnamoorthi of Schaumburg.

 

A video showing Chicago Department of Aviation security officers yanking physician David Dao, 69, off a flight to Louisville on April 9 caused international shock waves. Dao's nose and teeth were broken, his family said.

The debacle started when United Airlines gate agents started to draft passengers after no volunteers stepped up to give up their seat.

The legislation would prohibit airlines from bumping passengers with tickets, instead requiring them to negotiate compensation before anyone boards.

The bill does not affect removal of people for safety or security reasons.

The bill is called the BOARD Fairly Act or Bumping on Overbooked Airplanes Requires Dealing Fairly Act.

United Airlines and Chicago officials have apologized amid the scandal and investigations are ongoing.

Schakowsky said she's polled other flyers who "think it's a great idea" and "since my fellow congressmen travel by air just about every week, I hope I'll find (bipartisan) support."

0 Comments
                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 
Article Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.