Good News Sunday: Trishaws let seniors revive a love of biking

  • Dolores Roti of Hebron enjoys a trishaw ride escorted by Peg and Jim Bolm of McHenry County Cycling Without Age.

    Dolores Roti of Hebron enjoys a trishaw ride escorted by Peg and Jim Bolm of McHenry County Cycling Without Age. Courtesy of Gregory Glover

 
 
Posted8/1/2021 7:00 AM

This is Good News Sunday, a compilation of some of the more upbeat and inspiring stories published recently by the Daily Herald:

After clocking many miles on her bike in her life, at age 90, Arlington Heights resident Rita Moody considered her cycling days in the past. That is, until the Elk Grove Village chapter of Cycling Without Age upended that notion.

 

Cycling Without Age's three-wheeled trishaw allows Moody to "bike" Busse Woods Forest Preserve effortlessly. Son Warren and wife Kim, trained "pilots" for the chapter, do all the legwork, so she relaxes, reliving the freedom and joy of cycling.

Henry Reich & June Anderson at Brookdale Hawthorn Lakes Senior Living Center enjoy their Tuesday trishaw outings.
Henry Reich & June Anderson at Brookdale Hawthorn Lakes Senior Living Center enjoy their Tuesday trishaw outings. - Courtesy of Brookdale Hawthorn Lakes Senior Living

Operating since summer 2019, CWA Elk Grove Village is one of four Illinois chapters, with 2,500 worldwide. It is now a global movement in 50 countries.

CWA started in 2012 in Copenhagen when Ole Kassow offered rides to isolated and sedentary seniors.

Elk Grove Village's chapter offers a special free ride event from 9 to 11 a.m. Aug. 17 at the Busse Lake Boating Center. The Aug. 28 Busse Night Ride, hosted annually by Friends of Cycling in Elk Grove, will also feature the trishaw.

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Olivia Smoliga reacts after winning her heat in the Women's 100 backstroke during wave 2 of the U.S. Olympic Swim Trials on Monday, June 14, 2021, in Omaha, Nebraska.
Olivia Smoliga reacts after winning her heat in the Women's 100 backstroke during wave 2 of the U.S. Olympic Swim Trials on Monday, June 14, 2021, in Omaha, Nebraska. - AP Photo/Jeff Roberson
Olivia Smoliga of Glenview helps relay team to bronze

It might not have been the fastest time in the qualifier, but the U.S. women's 4X100 freestyle relay team, which featured Olivia Smoliga of Glenview, earned a spot in the finals -- and then took the bronze medal.

The Americans, who revamped their lineup for the final and subbed out Smoliga and two others who swam the qualifier, finished third (3:32.81) in the finals behind Australia and Canada.

Australia set a world record with 3:29.69.

In the qualifier, the United States had placed fifth out of the eight qualifiers with a 3:34.8, behind Australia (3:31.73), the Netherlands, Canada and Great Britain.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

For the full story, click here.

South Elgin resident Stacy Lazzara poses in front of a mural she painted at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital in Winfield. Lazzara painted three murals in rooms used for pediatric sleep studies to help young patients feel more welcomed during their stay.
South Elgin resident Stacy Lazzara poses in front of a mural she painted at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital in Winfield. Lazzara painted three murals in rooms used for pediatric sleep studies to help young patients feel more welcomed during their stay. - Courtesy of Northwestern Medicine
Artist spruces up pediatric sleep center

For nearly 2 years, South Elgin resident Stacy Lazzara spent many hours at Northwestern Medicine Central DuPage Hospital as her daughter Averie, now 5 years old, went through treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

Although it was a difficult time, Stacy remembers how the pediatric oncology team helped to brighten their days with things like bike rides around the hospital floor, and even a visit with a pony.

She wanted to give back to the Winfield hospital and offered her artistic talent to paint kid-friendly murals for the pediatric sleep center.

"I just wanted a way to pay forward all the love and kindness our family has been shown throughout Averie's medical journey," Stacy said.

"I loved the idea of using murals to bring a sense of adventure to the kids' overnight stays."

Stacy shared her mural ideas with Patti DeJuilio, clinical director of respiratory care in the sleep center.

After a few modifications, the themes were set: desert camping, enchanted forest, and outer space.

"When I saw the first mural, I was brought to tears," said DeJuilio. "I was so happy for the kids, because they can have a hard time sometimes falling asleep, they're frightened, and I feel like the murals make it much more warm and welcoming for the children coming in for a sleep study."

For the full story, click here.

Pete Contos, firefighter/paramedic, hauls his gear into the eight pod sleeping quarters for fire personnel as station 23 is now in service in Wheeling.
Pete Contos, firefighter/paramedic, hauls his gear into the eight pod sleeping quarters for fire personnel as station 23 is now in service in Wheeling. - Mark Welsh | Staff Photographer
Fire department moves into new digs

It was moving day Tuesday for the Wheeling Fire Department's Station 23.

Firefighters loaded the newly constructed building at 780 S. Wheeling Road with gear, furniture, food and other things they'll need to live and work there.

Located just north of Hintz Road, the station was built on the site of its predecessor, which was demolished last fall after 42 years of service.

Steve Mella, deputy fire chief for Wheeling talks about the new station and how much more space there is from the older station, which was torn down as they move into Wheeling's new station 23.
Steve Mella, deputy fire chief for Wheeling talks about the new station and how much more space there is from the older station, which was torn down as they move into Wheeling's new station 23. - Mark Welsh | Staff Photographer

Size was a big factor for the need of a new station. At roughly 6,500 square feet, the old station was designed to house three crew members per shift, not the current five. It also wasn't large enough for modern fire trucks.

The new firehouse is about 11,000 square feet, and a lot of that extra room is in a spacious vehicle bay to house more modern fire trucks.

It's been updated, too with facilities to house potential female crew members

Veteran firefighter-paramedic Bob Carlson liked one thing about the new, $5 million station right away: It has tile floors, not carpet.

"(It's) easier to clean," he said, reflecting the tradition of firefighters handling their own housekeeping.

Crash Truck 23, an airport firefighting foam truck that can ride into a hazard scene, is parked outside the new fire station 23 in Wheeling.
Crash Truck 23, an airport firefighting foam truck that can ride into a hazard scene, is parked outside the new fire station 23 in Wheeling. - Mark Welsh | Staff Photographer

Other improved amenities include a dedicated workout room filled with free weights and exercise machines, a comfortable kitchen and dining area, modern offices and relatively private sleeping quarters equipped with beds and desks.

For the full story, click here.

• Good News Sunday will run each weekend. Please visit dailyherald.com/newsletters to sign up for our Good News Sunday newsletter.

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