Grilled Hoisin-Garlic Shrimp

  • Grilled Hoisin-Garlic Shrimp is even better with a finishing touch of butter and lemon.

    Grilled Hoisin-Garlic Shrimp is even better with a finishing touch of butter and lemon. Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post

  • There is no need to presoak skewers for Grilled Hoisin-Garlic Shrimp. You thread shrimp in place and then soak the entire skewer in the marinade.

    There is no need to presoak skewers for Grilled Hoisin-Garlic Shrimp. You thread shrimp in place and then soak the entire skewer in the marinade. Stacy Zarin Goldberg for The Washington Post

 
By Bonnie S. Benwick
The Washington Post

This preparation reminds me that even the simplest recipe can provide a cooking lesson or two. To wit:

1. There's more than one way to skewer shrimp, and the one I'm keen on lately involves a vertical, top-to-tail run-through. The flesh is evenly exposed to the heat and the chance of overcooking is reduced. Bonus: The technique is visually interesting.

2. For the grill or grill pan, choose shrimp on the large side; 16-20 count works for me. Normally, I'd take off the tails, but in this case they help keep the shrimp intact for eating by hand.

3. You can skip the soaking step for bamboo skewers when you thread the shrimp pre-marinade. The skewers will get sufficiently moistened to keep them from burning.

4. Hoisin sauce is a great and versatile pantry ingredient, offering timesaving, salty-sweet, umami power. An opened jar can be refrigerated for up to a year, and a modest amount is all it takes here.

5. A finishing touch of melted butter makes these grilled shrimp taste even better. Why limit the brushing technique to biscuits?

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