An electric line envisioned for Harley-Davidson

 
 
Updated 2/4/2019 6:28 AM
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  • Harley-Davidson e-concepts

    Harley-Davidson e-concepts Photos Courtesy of Harley-Davidson

  • A small Harley-Davidson badge graces the front of the concept bike, which was unveiled last week at the X Games in Aspen, Colorado.

    A small Harley-Davidson badge graces the front of the concept bike, which was unveiled last week at the X Games in Aspen, Colorado.

  • Both concept bikes are powered by a battery pack that can be removed and brought inside for recharging.

    Both concept bikes are powered by a battery pack that can be removed and brought inside for recharging.

More and more, Harley-Davidson is looking to reinvent itself, having declared it will lead the charge in the electrification of motorcycles. Continuing to prove good on that mission, the company last week showed two yet-to-be named lightweight electric concepts at the X Games in Aspen, Colorado. Both showcase some very real ideas Harley has for it's two-wheeled future.

The first is a compact city buzzer, ideal for packed urban environments and crowded streets. The battery pack sits low in an open frame, highlighted with black and orange accents -- a nod to the brand's iconic color scheme. The headlight is a trick open-circle of LED lighting, framing an ultramodern, all-black, scriptless logo of Harley's famed shield. High handlebars and smooth tires further bolster the appeal for cross-town errands or cross-campus jaunts.

This Harley concept is envisioned for the city-dwelling rider who wants economical transportation around town.
This Harley concept is envisioned for the city-dwelling rider who wants economical transportation around town. -

If that runabout is for pavement, the second is for packed and loose dirt. Part mountain, part dirt bike, this all-road concept boasts big, knobby wheels and tires and an aggressive suspension with plenty of travel.

The battery pack is mounted vertically along the frame so as not to interfere with obstacles encountered out on the trail or bounding and bombing through urban terrain.

Both e-bikes' battery packs are removable and stated to be light enough to be carried by one hand. It's intended to be brought indoors and charged on a dock, powered by a standard household outlet.

There's no official word on charging times or range and because both of these are purely concepts at this point, no information was given on pricing.

This motorcycle, geared toward those who seek more thrills, can be ridden off-road or on pavement.
This motorcycle, geared toward those who seek more thrills, can be ridden off-road or on pavement. -

H-D's vision is that both bikes would be easy to ride, featuring no clutch, no shifting and ideally, with the goal that no motorcycle license would be required to work them. Their thinking is that this "twist and go" operation should amp up more (and ideally, younger) riders to consider two-wheel travel.

Harley's electric LiveWire motorcycle will be available this fall staring at $29,799.
Harley's electric LiveWire motorcycle will be available this fall staring at $29,799. -

Harley-Davidson has even more e-news, revealing late last year the production version of its all-electric 2020 LiveWire motorcycle. They also announced the model is now available for U.S. dealer pre-order, with deliveries taking place later this fall. Pricing starts at $29,799. This motorcycle is reported to have an estimated range of 110 miles after an overnight charge.

• Share your car's story with Matt at auto@dailyherald.com. Learn about his book at COPOthebook.com.

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