Correction: Deepwater Horizon-Drilling Deeper story

  • FILE - This April 21, 2010 file photo shows oil in the Gulf of Mexico, more than 50 miles southeast of Venice on Louisiana's tip, as the Deepwater Horizon oil rig burns. Ten years after an oil rig explosion killed 11 workers and unleashed an environmental nightmare in the Gulf of Mexico, companies are drilling into deeper and deeper waters where the payoffs can be huge but the risks are greater than ever.

    FILE - This April 21, 2010 file photo shows oil in the Gulf of Mexico, more than 50 miles southeast of Venice on Louisiana's tip, as the Deepwater Horizon oil rig burns. Ten years after an oil rig explosion killed 11 workers and unleashed an environmental nightmare in the Gulf of Mexico, companies are drilling into deeper and deeper waters where the payoffs can be huge but the risks are greater than ever. Associated Press

  • FILE - This April 21, 2010 file photo shows the Deepwater Horizon oil rig burning after an explosion in the Gulf of Mexico, off the southeast tip of Louisiana. Ten years after an oil rig explosion killed 11 workers and unleashed an environmental nightmare in the Gulf of Mexico, companies are drilling into deeper and deeper waters where the payoffs can be huge but the risks are greater than ever.

    FILE - This April 21, 2010 file photo shows the Deepwater Horizon oil rig burning after an explosion in the Gulf of Mexico, off the southeast tip of Louisiana. Ten years after an oil rig explosion killed 11 workers and unleashed an environmental nightmare in the Gulf of Mexico, companies are drilling into deeper and deeper waters where the payoffs can be huge but the risks are greater than ever. Associated Press

  • In this undated photo, released by the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, an inspector with the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement is seen surveying the Gulf of Mexico for pollution. Since the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill companies have been drilling in deeper and deeper waters. (U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement via AP)

    In this undated photo, released by the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, an inspector with the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement is seen surveying the Gulf of Mexico for pollution. Since the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill companies have been drilling in deeper and deeper waters. (U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement via AP) Associated Press

  • In this July 13, 2017, released by the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, An oil industry facility in the Gulf of Mexico is seen. Ten years after an accident on a BP oil rig killed 11 people and spilled 134 million gallons of crude, the Trump administration has eased safety regulations to encourage energy production. (U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement via AP)

    In this July 13, 2017, released by the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, An oil industry facility in the Gulf of Mexico is seen. Ten years after an accident on a BP oil rig killed 11 people and spilled 134 million gallons of crude, the Trump administration has eased safety regulations to encourage energy production. (U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement via AP) Associated Press

  • In this July 13, 2017, released by the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, An oil industry facility in the Gulf of Mexico is seen. Oil wells in waters at least 1,000 feet deep now account for about 90 percent of crude from the Gulf, one of the world's largest offshore oil fields. (U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement via AP)

    In this July 13, 2017, released by the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, An oil industry facility in the Gulf of Mexico is seen. Oil wells in waters at least 1,000 feet deep now account for about 90 percent of crude from the Gulf, one of the world's largest offshore oil fields. (U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement via AP) Associated Press

  • In this July 24, 2018, photo released by the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, engineers from the bureau inspect an oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico. Inspection visits have been declining in the years since the Deepwater Horizon accident killed 11 people and spilled 134 million gallons of oil in the Gulf. (U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement via AP)

    In this July 24, 2018, photo released by the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, engineers from the bureau inspect an oil platform in the Gulf of Mexico. Inspection visits have been declining in the years since the Deepwater Horizon accident killed 11 people and spilled 134 million gallons of oil in the Gulf. (U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement via AP) Associated Press

  • In this July 24, 2018, released by the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, Engineers from the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement inspect a Gulf of Mexico oil platform. Oil companies say they are better prepared for accidents 10 years after BP's Deepwater Horizon disaster, but some scientists and former agency officials say the Trump administration's move to ease safety regulations are cause for worry. (U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement via AP)

    In this July 24, 2018, released by the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, Engineers from the U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement inspect a Gulf of Mexico oil platform. Oil companies say they are better prepared for accidents 10 years after BP's Deepwater Horizon disaster, but some scientists and former agency officials say the Trump administration's move to ease safety regulations are cause for worry. (U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement via AP) Associated Press

  • In this Tuesday March 10, 2020 photo, the five cap stacks built by Marine Well Containment Company undergo rigorous pressure testing at the company yard in Ingleside, Texas. The devices help containment oil from blown out wells like the BP operated Macondo prospect which devastated the Gulf of Mexico ten years ago.

    In this Tuesday March 10, 2020 photo, the five cap stacks built by Marine Well Containment Company undergo rigorous pressure testing at the company yard in Ingleside, Texas. The devices help containment oil from blown out wells like the BP operated Macondo prospect which devastated the Gulf of Mexico ten years ago. Associated Press

  • In this Tuesday March 10, 2020 photo, David Nickerson, CEO of Marine Well Containment Company, describes the function of five cap stacks engineered by the not-for-profit disaster response consortium, in Ingleside, Texas. MWCC was created after the BP Oil disaster devastated the Gulf of Mexico ten years ago.

    In this Tuesday March 10, 2020 photo, David Nickerson, CEO of Marine Well Containment Company, describes the function of five cap stacks engineered by the not-for-profit disaster response consortium, in Ingleside, Texas. MWCC was created after the BP Oil disaster devastated the Gulf of Mexico ten years ago. Associated Press

  • In this Tuesday March 10, 2020 photo, David Nickerson, CEO of Marine Well Containment Company, points to the hydrocarbon train that fits on top a oil spill disaster response tanker, in Ingleside, Texas. The device helps process spilled oil and other hydrocarbons. It also helps collect oil spewing out of blown out deep sea wells for storage in oil tankers hulls.

    In this Tuesday March 10, 2020 photo, David Nickerson, CEO of Marine Well Containment Company, points to the hydrocarbon train that fits on top a oil spill disaster response tanker, in Ingleside, Texas. The device helps process spilled oil and other hydrocarbons. It also helps collect oil spewing out of blown out deep sea wells for storage in oil tankers hulls. Associated Press

  • FILE - In this May 19, 2010 file photo, boat captain Preston Morris shows the oil on his hands while collecting surface samples from the oil impacted marsh of Pass a Loutre, La. on Wednesday. Oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill is infiltrating the coast of Louisiana. Ten years after an oil rig explosion killed 11 workers and unleashed an environmental nightmare in the Gulf of Mexico, companies are drilling into deeper and deeper waters where the payoffs can be huge but the risks are greater than ever.

    FILE - In this May 19, 2010 file photo, boat captain Preston Morris shows the oil on his hands while collecting surface samples from the oil impacted marsh of Pass a Loutre, La. on Wednesday. Oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill is infiltrating the coast of Louisiana. Ten years after an oil rig explosion killed 11 workers and unleashed an environmental nightmare in the Gulf of Mexico, companies are drilling into deeper and deeper waters where the payoffs can be huge but the risks are greater than ever. Associated Press

  • FILE - In this May 5, 2010 file photo, oil and oil sheen are seen moving past an oil rig, top right, in the waters of Chandeleur Sound, La. Ten years after an oil rig explosion killed 11 workers and unleashed an environmental nightmare in the Gulf of Mexico, companies are drilling into deeper and deeper waters where the payoffs can be huge but the risks are greater than ever.

    FILE - In this May 5, 2010 file photo, oil and oil sheen are seen moving past an oil rig, top right, in the waters of Chandeleur Sound, La. Ten years after an oil rig explosion killed 11 workers and unleashed an environmental nightmare in the Gulf of Mexico, companies are drilling into deeper and deeper waters where the payoffs can be huge but the risks are greater than ever. Associated Press

  • FILE - In this June 3, 2010 file photo, a Brown Pelican is mired in oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, on the beach at East Grand Terre Island along the Louisiana coast. Ten years after an oil rig explosion killed 11 workers and unleashed an environmental nightmare in the Gulf of Mexico, companies are drilling into deeper and deeper waters where the payoffs can be huge but the risks are greater than ever.

    FILE - In this June 3, 2010 file photo, a Brown Pelican is mired in oil from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, on the beach at East Grand Terre Island along the Louisiana coast. Ten years after an oil rig explosion killed 11 workers and unleashed an environmental nightmare in the Gulf of Mexico, companies are drilling into deeper and deeper waters where the payoffs can be huge but the risks are greater than ever. Associated Press

  • FILE - In this May 5, 2010 file photo, shrimp boats are used to collect oil with booms in the waters of Chandeleur Sound, La. Ten years after an oil rig explosion killed 11 workers and unleashed an environmental nightmare in the Gulf of Mexico, companies are drilling into deeper and deeper waters where the payoffs can be huge but the risks are greater than ever.

    FILE - In this May 5, 2010 file photo, shrimp boats are used to collect oil with booms in the waters of Chandeleur Sound, La. Ten years after an oil rig explosion killed 11 workers and unleashed an environmental nightmare in the Gulf of Mexico, companies are drilling into deeper and deeper waters where the payoffs can be huge but the risks are greater than ever. Associated Press

 
 
Updated 4/21/2020 8:39 AM

NEW ORLEANS -- In a story April 18, 2020, about deep water offshore drilling, The Associated Press incorrectly identified an environmental group opposed to Trump administration regulation changes as the National Resources Defense Council. The correct name of the organization is the Natural Resources Defense Council.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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