The Waiting Game: For NBA coaches, that's the new schedule

                                                                                                                                                                                                   
  • Orlando Magic coach Steve Clifford reacts during the second half of the team's NBA basketball game against the Memphis Grizzlies on Tuesday, March 10, 2020, in Memphis, Tenn.

    Orlando Magic coach Steve Clifford reacts during the second half of the team's NBA basketball game against the Memphis Grizzlies on Tuesday, March 10, 2020, in Memphis, Tenn. Associated Press

  • Miami Heat head coach Erik Spoelstra speaks during a news conference after an NBA basketball game between the Heat and the Charlotte Hornets, Wednesday, March 11, 2020, in Miami. The NBA has suspended its season "until further notice" after a Utah Jazz player tested positive Wednesday for the coronavirus, a move that came only hours after the majority of the league's owners were leaning toward playing games without fans in arenas.

    Miami Heat head coach Erik Spoelstra speaks during a news conference after an NBA basketball game between the Heat and the Charlotte Hornets, Wednesday, March 11, 2020, in Miami. The NBA has suspended its season "until further notice" after a Utah Jazz player tested positive Wednesday for the coronavirus, a move that came only hours after the majority of the league's owners were leaning toward playing games without fans in arenas. Associated Press

  • Milwaukee Bucks head coach Mike Budenholzer reacts during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Philadelphia 76ers Saturday, Feb. 22, 2020, in Milwaukee.

    Milwaukee Bucks head coach Mike Budenholzer reacts during the first half of an NBA basketball game against the Philadelphia 76ers Saturday, Feb. 22, 2020, in Milwaukee. Associated Press

  • Former University of Florida head coach and Gator legend Billy Donovan talks to the crowd Saturday, Feb. 15, 2020 as the court is renamed Billy Donovan Court during a game against Vanderbilt, in Gainesville, Fla. Saturday, Feb. 15, 2020. (Brad McClenny/The Gainesville Sun via AP)

    Former University of Florida head coach and Gator legend Billy Donovan talks to the crowd Saturday, Feb. 15, 2020 as the court is renamed Billy Donovan Court during a game against Vanderbilt, in Gainesville, Fla. Saturday, Feb. 15, 2020. (Brad McClenny/The Gainesville Sun via AP) Associated Press

  • Dallas Mavericks head coach Rick Carlisle looks on from the sidelines as the Mavericks play the Indiana Pacers during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Dallas. The Pacers won 112-109.

    Dallas Mavericks head coach Rick Carlisle looks on from the sidelines as the Mavericks play the Indiana Pacers during the first half of an NBA basketball game, Sunday, March 8, 2020, in Dallas. The Pacers won 112-109. Associated Press

 
 
Updated 4/2/2020 8:44 PM

MIAMI -- Orlando's Steve Clifford figures he's like every other NBA coach right now: Wake up, go to whatever now serves as the office, study his own team, maybe think about possible opponents, and resume planning.

Of course, nobody knows what they're planning for - or when these plans will get used.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

A stoppage in play doesn't mean vacation time has arrived for NBA coaches, especially those like Clifford in position to take their teams to the postseason - assuming this pandemic-interrupted season is able to resume. They're all spending more time at home, not able to run practices, but none seem to be sitting idly.

'Not knowing the restart date is the toughest challenge professionally,' Clifford said. 'Obviously, we're all limited in what we can do, and basketball takes a back seat right now to family and health. But I will say this: When I talk to our guys, the one common question that comes up is 'When do you think we can start again?''

And that's a question with no answer. The waiting game is the only game in town right now.

Miami's Erik Spoelstra was coaching the fourth quarter against Charlotte on March 11 when the NBA announced it was suspending the season, a move made once it became known that Utah center Rudy Gobert was the league's first player to test positive for COVID-19. Spoelstra found out right after the final buzzer, as he walked to the locker room.

He instantly realized that losing to the Hornets that night didn't ultimately matter much. Spoelstra and his staff are holding Zoom meetings every other day, but he's also enjoying the benefits of time away - getting more time with his two young sons, his wife and grilling for the family most nights - and is emphasizing to his coaches and players that this is a time to help those less fortunate.

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He's checking the news as well, on a limited basis.

'My routine is checking after dinner, and I usually get on my computer, watch a little bit of what's going on,' said Spoelstra, who often wears a T-shirt emblazoned with 'Stay Positive' and like many coaches he taped a video telling fans the importance of hand-washing and other precautions. 'So, I'm staying abreast of the current status of things, but I definitely do not try to start my day that way and I do not obsess about it during the day.'


Dallas coach Rick Carlisle also went the video-message route, doing one for the going-stir-crazy crowd to demonstrate his 'Balance, Balance, Shot Drill' that allows players to work on their shooting form even when they don't have access to a court or a rim.

Oklahoma City coach Billy Donovan took advantage of downtime to appear on a virtual coaches clinic, and had a safety message for those who attended - online, of course - before spending about an hour breaking down his philosophy. And Los Angeles Lakers coach Frank Vogel is spending some of his time watching old games, binging on Netflix and watching movies with the family, and plenty of cooking.

'This is bigger than basketball, and us getting back on the court is not the most important thing for the world right now," Vogel told reporters on a conference call Thursday night.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

This is the first in-season stoppage of its kind in NBA history, but Milwaukee coach Mike Budenholzer is equating the unknown - in terms of when the next game will be - to what the league went through with lockout-shortened seasons in 1998-99 and 2011-12.

His message to his staff: Things may be slow now, but when the suspension ends the pace of everything will be frantic. So while some projects like things in the video room and breakdowns of his roster are being tackled, Budenholzer is also having staff get ready for potential playoff opponents with a first-round series against either Brooklyn or Orlando likely for the NBA-leading Bucks.

'Things happen really fast, whether it's three games in three nights, or playoff series are shorter or the time between the end of the regular season to the first playoff game, everything can be shorter or can happen quicker,' Budenholzer said. 'We can put a little bit of money in the bank now with preparation for first round but also if you go a little bit deeper, the East.'

For 30 teams, 30 coaches, there's many ways to spend the down time.

And they all know that they're in the same boat - waiting and wondering.

'It's hard for all of us,' Clifford said. 'It's hard to set a plan for yourself that will have you ready. But that's the parallel, not just for us, but for everyone around the world no matter what profession that you're in.'

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AP Sports Writers Steve Megargee in Milwaukee and Greg Beacham in Los Angeles contributed to this story.

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More AP NBA: https://apnews.com/NBA and https://twitter.com/AP_Sports

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