Unlimited movie-theater deal could be too good to survive

 
 
Updated 2/9/2018 11:00 AM
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  • In this Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, photo, Cassie Langdon stands outside of AMC Indianapolis 17 theatre in Indianapolis. With MoviePass, Langdon said she's taking more chances on smaller releases instead of sticking with blockbusters and their sequels.

    In this Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, photo, Cassie Langdon stands outside of AMC Indianapolis 17 theatre in Indianapolis. With MoviePass, Langdon said she's taking more chances on smaller releases instead of sticking with blockbusters and their sequels. Associated Press

  • In this Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, photo, Cassie Langdon holds her MoviePass card outside AMC Indianapolis 17 theatre in Indianapolis. With MoviePass, Langdon said she's taking more chances on smaller releases instead of sticking with blockbusters and their sequels.

    In this Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, photo, Cassie Langdon holds her MoviePass card outside AMC Indianapolis 17 theatre in Indianapolis. With MoviePass, Langdon said she's taking more chances on smaller releases instead of sticking with blockbusters and their sequels. Associated Press

  • In this Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, photo, Cassie Langdon uses to her phone to launch the MoviePass app to see what movies are available at AMC Indianapolis 17 theatre in Indianapolis. With MoviePass, Langdon said she's taking more chances on smaller releases instead of sticking with blockbusters and their sequels.

    In this Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, photo, Cassie Langdon uses to her phone to launch the MoviePass app to see what movies are available at AMC Indianapolis 17 theatre in Indianapolis. With MoviePass, Langdon said she's taking more chances on smaller releases instead of sticking with blockbusters and their sequels. Associated Press

NEW YORK -- MoviePass is trying to bring to movie theaters what Netflix did for DVDs and online streaming: Let subscribers watch as many movies as they want for $10 a month.

In doing so, MoviePass has struck a chord with moviegoers and a nerve with the movie industry.

The service's popularity comes as ticket prices rise and cheaper online options increase.

With ticket prices in big cities at $15 and up, MoviePass loses money with just one movie. It needs deals with theater chains and movie studios, such as a share of popcorn revenue for bringing in moviegoers.

But the industry is skeptical and worried that as moviegoers get accustomed to much cheaper prices, consumer anger might be redirected at the theaters if MoviePass raises its prices or goes out of business.

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