Law firm helps with sex misconduct inquiry into Steve Wynn

 
 
Updated 2/3/2018 5:44 PM
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  • FILE - This March 15, 2016, file photo, shows casino mogul Steve Wynn at a news conference in Medford, Mass. The University of Pennsylvania has announced plans to distance itself from casino mogul Wynn and comedian Bill Cosby in the wake of sexual misconduct allegations against both men.  The college on Thursday, Feb. 1, 2018, said it will revoke Wynn’s honorary degree and remove his name from both an outdoor plaza and a scholarship fund. The school will also rescind Cosby’s honorary degree. The school says it has been a century since it took away an honorary degree but that “credible” allegations against the men warranted the action.

    FILE - This March 15, 2016, file photo, shows casino mogul Steve Wynn at a news conference in Medford, Mass. The University of Pennsylvania has announced plans to distance itself from casino mogul Wynn and comedian Bill Cosby in the wake of sexual misconduct allegations against both men. The college on Thursday, Feb. 1, 2018, said it will revoke Wynn’s honorary degree and remove his name from both an outdoor plaza and a scholarship fund. The school will also rescind Cosby’s honorary degree. The school says it has been a century since it took away an honorary degree but that “credible” allegations against the men warranted the action. Associated Press

LAS VEGAS -- Wynn Resorts has hired a law firm to help investigate sexual misconduct allegations against casino mogul Steve Wynn, the company's chairman and CEO.

A statement by Los Angeles-based law firm O'Melveny & Myers LLP says it will assist the Wynn board's special committee of independent directors with the inquiry.

The statement released Friday says investigators will set up a phone and web-based reporting line for current and former Wynn employees to provide information.

The Wall Street Journal reported Jan. 26 that a number of women said Wynn harassed or assaulted them and that one case led to a $7.5 million settlement.

The Las Vegas billionaire has vehemently denied the allegations, which he attributed to a campaign led by his ex-wife.

He also faces investigations by gambling regulators in two states.

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