Medical student learns lesson at hospice

  • Chanell Davis of Chicago plans to be a doctor and has gained valuable insights as a volunteer at JourneyCare's Ada F. Addington Hospice CareCenter at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago

    Chanell Davis of Chicago plans to be a doctor and has gained valuable insights as a volunteer at JourneyCare's Ada F. Addington Hospice CareCenter at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago Courtesy of JourneyCare

 
By Chanell Davis
Posted11/28/2016 6:00 AM

My goal is to help others by becoming a doctor, and volunteering for JourneyCare allows me to interact with patients and help them in a way you simply cannot in most hospital settings.

Since beginning my work at JourneyCare's Ada F. Addington Hospice CareCenter at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago this past spring, I have learned that working with patients and their families is about quality of care.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Unlike a traditional hospital setting, it's not about how quickly you can get them in and out. It is about talking to them, asking about their interests and learning who they are so you can serve them best.

Caring for someone at the end of life puts the importance of these things -- communication, quality of life, and the little efforts that can help -- into perspective.

This week I began helping my first family in home hospice. I stay with a patient who has congestive heart failure for the hour between when his mother leaves for work and when his uncle arrives to care for him. It is so rewarding to see the relief your presence can provide with something small like that.

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