Teens 'Say Yes to the Prom Dress' at Aurora library

  • Sarah Bentson of Waubonsie Valley High School looks over dresses during the "Say Yes to the Prom Dress" program Saturday at the Aurora Santori Public Library. Several librarians collected more than 300 gently-used dresses to be given away in exchange for a food donation.

      Sarah Bentson of Waubonsie Valley High School looks over dresses during the "Say Yes to the Prom Dress" program Saturday at the Aurora Santori Public Library. Several librarians collected more than 300 gently-used dresses to be given away in exchange for a food donation. Daniel White | Staff Photographer

  • Bea Mangayaay, left, of Oswego High School looks over dresses during the "Say Yes to the Prom Dress" program Saturday at the Aurora Santori Public Library. Above, Mangayaay gets help from her mother Jenny Mangayaay, center, and family friend Nancy Scheri, right, in selecting her dress.

      Bea Mangayaay, left, of Oswego High School looks over dresses during the "Say Yes to the Prom Dress" program Saturday at the Aurora Santori Public Library. Above, Mangayaay gets help from her mother Jenny Mangayaay, center, and family friend Nancy Scheri, right, in selecting her dress. Daniel White | Staff Photographer

 
Daily Herald report
Updated 4/2/2016 6:18 PM

Girls on a budget who were hunting for the perfect prom dress had a good chance of finding what they were looking for Saturday during a "Say Yes to the Prom Dress" event at Aurora's Santori Public Library in the city's downtown.

Teen librarians Hannah Sloan, Melisa Martinez and Pat Schwartz had collected more than 300 gently-used dresses to be given away at the event in exchange for a food donation.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Held on the library's second floor, the prom program was open to any teen in pursuit of something that looked and fit just right. The only catch -- and it could hardly be considered a catch -- was that each participant was asked to bring a canned food item to be donated to an area food pantry.

The dresses were given away in as-is condition, one to a girl. Two volunteer seamstresses were on hand to help girls decide if dresses could be altered to fit, although those alterations ultimately are the responsibility of the girl.

In addition, a Mary Kay representative was on hand to share makeup tips and there were drawings for free silk corsages and boutonnieres.

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