Scalia's daughter, of Wheaton: 'I will miss my dad'

  • Antonin Scalia, just up to four years before he became a U.S. Supreme Court justice, taught at the University of Chicago.

    Antonin Scalia, just up to four years before he became a U.S. Supreme Court justice, taught at the University of Chicago. Associated Press, 2007

 
Daily Herald report
Updated 2/15/2016 9:57 PM

Ann Scalia Banaszewski of Wheaton declined to be interviewed after the death of her father, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, but she issued a statement by email Monday night.

"I will miss my dad immensely. He was a good man and a wonderful husband, father and grandfather," she wrote. "He loved God, family and our country, and I am proud of his contribution to our nation.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

"What I'll most miss is his witty sense of humor and his love of music. As we grieve, our family is grateful for the many condolences and prayers we've received from those in our community."

Scalia was found dead Saturday morning at private residence in the Big Bend area of West Texas, after he'd gone to his room the night before and did not appear for breakfast. He was reported Monday to have died of natural causes.

The only child of an Italian immigrant father who was a professor of Romance languages and a mother who taught elementary school, Scalia graduated first in his class at Georgetown University and won high honors at the Harvard University Law School.

From 1977 to 1982, Scalia taught law at the University of Chicago. He then was appointed by Reagan to the U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. Reagan named him to the Supreme Court in 1986.

Scalia and his wife, Maureen, had nine children.

• The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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