Labor Day target for new Kane court computer system

  • Kane County Circuit Court Clerk Thomas Hartwell said the county's new case management system will go live Labor Day weekend.

    Kane County Circuit Court Clerk Thomas Hartwell said the county's new case management system will go live Labor Day weekend.

 
 
Updated 2/12/2016 11:33 AM

While many residents are looking forward to spring, Kane County prosecutors, defense attorneys and others in law enforcement could have an eye on the unofficial end of summer.

Labor Day weekend is the launch date for the county's case management computer upgrade, Circuit Court Clerk Thomas Hartwell said.

 

"The go live date for the new system is Labor Day," Hartwell said. "We get an extra day (to work out bugs). It couldn't come any sooner."

The Kane County Board in summer 2014 signed off on a $6 million contract with Texas-based Tyler Technologies to complete the massive technology upgrade of the current court case management system. The contract includes a $603,000 contingency, and overall is a far cry from the initial $12.6 million estimate six years ago.

The current system is so old and inefficient employees must often resort to counting records by hand, sometimes resulting in unreliable data.

Hartwell said the new system will increase accuracy, decrease the time it take to look up records, and allow attorneys to file court motions and lawsuits electronically, saving time and cost to their client to drive to the clerk's office in St. Charles. Federal lawsuits may be filed electronically; nearby McHenry County began e-filing in 2013.

As of now, law firms can pay Hartwell's office a yearly fee to be able to look up and view court files electronically and remotely. Hartwell said he is working with Kane County Chief Judge Susan Clancy Boles to possibly expand that feature to non-law businesses.

Hartwell said Tyler also has technology and evolving programs to ensure the new case management system stays up to date and evolve over time.

"My position is whatever is more efficient for the public. Electronic (filing) is preferred," Hartwell said. "This is a system that can last for decades. We expect this to last a very long time."

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