Hastert's public pensions unaffected by case so far

  • U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert is collecting three public pensions.

      U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert is collecting three public pensions. Rick West | Staff Photographer

 
 
Updated 6/11/2015 8:36 AM

Former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert collects public pensions totaling as much as $116,000 a year.

Would a conviction on the federal charges he now faces put those pensions in danger? The longtime congressman from Plano pleaded not guilty Tuesday to charges of violating banking laws and lying to the FBI.

                                                                                                                                                                                                                       
 

Hastert's lobbying career almost certainly provided more income than his pension payouts, but Hastert resigned his lobbying job shortly after he was charged.

Here's a by-the-numbers look at what experts say about Hastert's retirement benefits.

3:

The number of public pensions Hastert is collecting. One is from his time as a teacher in Yorkville from 1965 to 1981. Another is from his time as a state lawmaker in Springfield from 1981 to 1986. The third is from his 20 years as a member of Congress, ending when he retired in 2007 a year into his 11th term.

$73,000:

What the National Tax Union estimates Hastert collects every year from his congressional pension. The true amount isn't public record.

$27,210:

Hastert collects this much a year for his time serving in the Illinois House.

$16,139:

In 1997, Hastert started collecting a pension from his years teaching and coaching in Yorkville, and this is how much he takes in per year.

0:

The amount of pension money Hastert is in danger of losing, at least for now. He'd have to be convicted of a felony that related to either his lawmaking or teaching before the state would consider taking either of those two pensions away. Federal law enforcement sources have told The Associated Press that the "past misconduct" prosecutors say Hastert was trying to cover up with $3.5 million in cash payments relates to his time as a teacher in Yorkville.

Teachers' Retirement System spokesman Dave Urbanek said the agency is watching the case. Even if Hastert is convicted and TRS officials decided his smallest pension should be revoked, it wouldn't be stripped until sentencing.

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