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Article updated: 10/8/2013 3:48 PM

Rushing offense, defense still key in Big Ten

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Ohio State running back Carlos Hyde scores over Northwestern safety Traveon Henry during the second half of Saturday's game in Evanston. Hyde ran for three touchdowns in a 13˝-minute span of the second half.

Associated Press

Nebraska's Ameer Abdullah runs past Illinois linebacker T.J. Neal in the second half of Saturday's game in Lincoln, Neb. Abdullah ran for a career-high 225 yards and two touchdowns in Nebraska's 39-19 win.

Associated Press

Michigan State cornerback Trae Waynes tackles Iowa runningback Damon Bullock during the first half of Saturday's game in Iowa City. Michigan State's defense allows only a minuscule 51.2 rushing yards per game.

Associated Press

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With a full week of league play in the books, a familiar trend has emerged in the Big Ten. Running the ball -- and stopping others from doing likewise -- are going to be huge for teams hoping to contend for the conference title this season. Five Big Ten teams rank in the top 25 nationally in rushing offense, the most of any conference in the country. The Big Ten is also first with six teams ranked in the top 20 in rushing defense
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    • Ohio State running back Carlos Hyde scores over Northwestern safety Traveon Henry during the second half of Saturday’s game in Evanston. Hyde ran for three touchdowns in a 13˝-minute span of the second half.
    •  Nebraska’s Ameer Abdullah runs past Illinois linebacker T.J. Neal in the second half of Saturday’s game in Lincoln, Neb. Abdullah ran for a career-high 225 yards and two touchdowns in Nebraska’s 39-19 win.
    •  Michigan State cornerback Trae Waynes tackles Iowa runningback Damon Bullock during the first half of Saturday’s game in Iowa City. Michigan State’s defense allows only a minuscule 51.2 rushing yards per game.
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