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Article posted: 2/24/2013 6:00 AM

Favorite books come alive in literature-rich London

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A letter written by Samuel Johnson and a copy of the dictionary he wrote, which was published in 1755, are kept beneath a stained glass plaque at Dr. Johnson's House, a small museum in the 300-year-old townhouse where he lived in London.

Courtesy of VisitBritain

A monument to William Shakespeare is in the Poets Corner at Westminster Abbey in London. Many famous British writers are memorialized here, including Charles Dickens and Geoffrey Chaucer.

Courtesy of VisitBritain

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Dr. Johnson's House, is a small museum in the 300-year-old townhouse where Samuel Johnson lived in London. Johnson was an author, critic and lexicographer who wrote A Dictionary of the English Language.

Courtesy of VisitBritain

People walk across a snowy Millennium Bridge near St. Paul's Cathedral in London.

Associated Press

A blue plaque is on the exterior of Charles Dickens' home, part of the Charles Dickens Museum in London. For years, the four-story brick row house where the author lived with his young family was a dusty and slightly neglected museum, a mecca for Dickens scholars, but overlooked by most visitors.

Associated Press

A servant's room in Charles Dickens' home, part of the Charles Dickens Museum.

Associated Press

Workers walk across London Bridge. For visitors on a literary tour of London, Charles Dickens' "Great Expectations" included a scene in which Pip crossed the bridge in great despair after learning that Estella was to be married to Drummle.

Associated Press

About this Article

London is the kind of place where past and present, fiction and real-life swirl together in an ever-changing kaleidoscope. Which is why a fun way to explore the nooks and crannies of this sprawling city is to take a novel approach and look for places featured in your favorite books, or for the real-life hangouts of writers you admire. Your choices are as varied as the many authors linked to London.
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    • A letter written by Samuel Johnson and a copy of the dictionary he wrote, which was published in 1755, are kept beneath a stained glass plaque at Dr. Johnson's House, a small museum in the 300-year-old townhouse where he lived in London.
    • A monument to William Shakespeare is in the Poets Corner at Westminster Abbey in London. Many famous British writers are memorialized here, including Charles Dickens and Geoffrey Chaucer.
    • Dr. Johnsonís House, is a small museum in the 300-year-old townhouse where Samuel Johnson lived in London. Johnson was an author, critic and lexicographer who wrote A Dictionary of the English Language.
    • People walk across a snowy Millennium Bridge near St. Paulís Cathedral in London.
    • A blue plaque is on the exterior of Charles Dickensí home, part of the Charles Dickens Museum in London. For years, the four-story brick row house where the author lived with his young family was a dusty and slightly neglected museum, a mecca for Dickens scholars, but overlooked by most visitors.
    • A servantís room in Charles Dickensí home, part of the Charles Dickens Museum.
    • Workers walk across London Bridge. For visitors on a literary tour of London, Charles Dickensí ďGreat ExpectationsĒ included a scene in which Pip crossed the bridge in great despair after learning that Estella was to be married to Drummle.
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