Suburban help for Occupy Chicago protesters

 
 
Updated 10/8/2011 8:22 AM
hello
  • Round Lake Beach residents Tim Bridgeman, left, and Derek Monroe, pack supplies into a van Friday for Chicago protesters. Monroe plans to haul the items downtown Saturday.

      Round Lake Beach residents Tim Bridgeman, left, and Derek Monroe, pack supplies into a van Friday for Chicago protesters. Monroe plans to haul the items downtown Saturday. Paul Valade | Staff Photographer

  • Round Lake Beach resident Derek Monroe hopes others will help Occupy Chicago demonstrators.

      Round Lake Beach resident Derek Monroe hopes others will help Occupy Chicago demonstrators. Paul Valade | Staff Photographer

  • Derek Monroe of Round Lake Beach packs supplies into his van Friday that he'll bring to Occupy Chicago demonstrators. Items include drinking water, tarpaulins and feminine hygiene products.

      Derek Monroe of Round Lake Beach packs supplies into his van Friday that he'll bring to Occupy Chicago demonstrators. Items include drinking water, tarpaulins and feminine hygiene products. Paul Valade | Staff Photographer

Protesters who've railed against politicians and corporations for more than two weeks are getting help from some suburban residents so the effort can continue around the clock in downtown Chicago.

What started as the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York last month has spread to other cities. Demonstrations started this week in Philadelphia, Salt Lake City and Los Angeles.

Occupy Chicago has been on public property in the financial district near LaSalle and Jackson streets since Sept. 23, calling attention to what organizers claim is corruption and complicity in the banking industry and government.

Corporate greed has been another bone of contention for the protesters.

Responding to Occupy Chicago's call for supplies to help the 24-hour-a-day protest, Round Lake Beach activist Derek Monroe will have a van ready to roll Saturday. He collected items from businesses, neighbors and others.

Monroe, who chipped in $150, plans to contribute at least 22 cases of drinking water, toothpaste, toothbrushes, 22 tarpaulins, feminine hygiene products, two reams of paper, peanut butter and medical supplies.

Stressing he's not anti-business, Monroe said the protests are a sign of a fed-up society that's reached a breaking point. He said he's unable to spend time protesting downtown, so contributing the supplies is a way to show support.

"Instead of democracy, we have evolved into the land of the financial thief, home to the corporate slave," said Monroe, 43, an international business consultant.

Attorney Rick Daniels of Lake Forest paid for some of the supplies Monroe will haul downtown, and he expects to join the protesters Saturday.

Daniels said he'll help coordinate free legal help for any Occupy Chicago protesters who may need it. He said Republicans, Democrats and the financial industry are "in collusion to steal the country," which is why he backs the protests.

"The vast majority of the people need to get out in the street and voice their opinion any way they can," said Daniels, a former Marine whose firm handles criminal defense cases and municipal law with clients such as the village of Antioch.

Article Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.