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updated: 10/23/2010 10:42 PM

Another gun located as Schaumburg cleanup wraps up Thursday

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  • A court-ordered cleanup continued Thursday at the home of John Wuerffel, with crews removing a car, motorcycle, 30 tires and even another gun from the Schaumburg residence.

      A court-ordered cleanup continued Thursday at the home of John Wuerffel, with crews removing a car, motorcycle, 30 tires and even another gun from the Schaumburg residence.
    George LeClaire

  • A court-ordered cleanup continued Thursday at the home of John Wuerffel.

      A court-ordered cleanup continued Thursday at the home of John Wuerffel.
    George LeClaire

 
By Joel Ebert

Workers found another firearm Thursday morning at the property of John Wuerffel, but police will not bring additional charges against the Schaumburg man whose rubbish-laden home underwent a court-ordered cleanup.

The weapon, a rusted and inoperable pistol, was located in Wuerffel's garage, along with about 30 automobile tires, an old Jaguar, a motorcycle and two bicycles.

The discovery comes a day after workers stumbled upon a handgun, two rifles and two shotguns inside Wuerffel's home in the 1400 block of Hampton Lane. The find led police to charge the 62-year-old with unlawful possession of a firearm without a valid firearm owners identification card.

Police said they will not bring any more charges as a result of the latest firearm discovery, but that the weapon would be placed into evidence with those located Wednesday.

Crews hired by the village of Schaumburg arrived at Wuerffel's home Thursday morning to begin a second day of removing tons of cardboard boxes, plastic and other rubbish from both inside and outside the residence.

Wuerffel, who says he's owned the home since 1971, also was on the scene, taking recyclables he hoped to store and later sell, as well as some personal items. He called the cleanup process "a nightmare.

But Schaumburg Public Health Officer Mary Passaglia said the cleanup, which ended Thursday afternoon, went relatively smoothly.

The work cost the village about $2,700, she said, but the price tag could rise because of tire disposal fees.

Village building inspectors are expected to examine the home Friday and assess the overall structure and safety.

The house has been deemed uninhabitable for months because of the accumulation of junk inside and its utilities having been turned off.

Wuerffel spent the summer months living in one of three junked cars parked in his driveway and plans to live in local homeless shelters this fall and winter.

A jury found him guilty in early September of violating village ordinances requiring the inside and outside of homes to be kept clean and free of rubbish. The ruling eventually led to a court order permitting the village to clean up the residence.

At his trial, Wuerffel said he has been out of work for more than six years and makes $1,000 a month by redeeming recyclable items for money in Michigan.

The house has been in foreclosure proceedings, though HSBC Corp. has put them on hold as it reviews the case.

Wuerffel said his goal is to work with the bank to be able to keep his home and eventually move back inside.