With the start of spring right around the corner, we asked Doris Taylor, plant clinic manager at The Morton Arboretum in Lisle, for some tips about trees we can plant that will provide beautiful blooms next spring. Here's what she had to say ...

1. Redbud

In April and May, this Chicago native produces bright purplish-pink flowers that line dark branches before its leaves open. Redbuds work especially well among evergreens that contrast with its color and shelter it from intense sunlight. This tree prefers moist, well-drained soil.

2. Pagoda dogwood

In late spring, this small tree shows off clusters of fragrant white flowers. Pagoda dogwoods make for a great addition to a garden space that gets partial shade. Green foliage in summer turns a beautiful burgundy-red in fall. The tree also sports blue-black berries that attract many different species of birds. The pagoda dogwood is also a favorite of butterflies.

3. Saucer magnolia

The saucer magnolia is known for its beautiful white and pink goblet-shaped flowers. A small- to medium-sized tree, the saucer magnolia needs full sun to partial sun and well-drained, slightly acidic soil. Its flowers are delicate so homeowners should avoid windy sites.

4. Japanese flowering crabapple

The Japanese flowering crabapple features showy, bright pink buds that open to fragrant white flowers in the spring. Crabapples are adaptable to most soil conditions, but prefer full sun in moist, well-drained soil. This small tree has shown good resistance to Japanese beetles.

5. White fringetree

The white fringetree's most exceptional feature is its fragrant, strap-like white flowers that bloom in late May to early June. Also known as old man's beard, this tree prefers full to partial sun and acidic soil. The fringe tree seldom needs pruning.

A red buckeye is a neatly rounded, multi-stemmed tree that sports upright clusters of crimson-red flowers. Daily Herald file photo
6. Red buckeye

A red buckeye is a neatly rounded, multi-stemmed tree that sports upright clusters of crimson-red flowers. This tree prefers partial shade but can tolerate full sun with adequate moisture. The tree gets its name from a small, dark brown nut that resembles the eye of a deer. The flowers attract butterflies and birds.

A Japanese tree lilac attracts the attention of insect pollinators as well as butterflies and hummingbirds. Daily Herald file photo
7. Japanese tree lilac

Large clusters of small creamy-white fragrant flowers that bloom later in the spring are the standout feature of the Japanese tree lilac. This small- to medium-sized tree is best in full sun and attracts the attention of insect pollinators as well as butterflies and hummingbirds.