Articles filed under Health & Fitness

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  • Flaxseed can be ground and added to foods such as yogurt or cottage cheese.

    Give your children a heart-healthy snack they will loveFeb 20, 2014 12:00 AM
    You want what’s best for your child, but some nights it’s a major feat just getting dinner to the table. You can take it up a notch in simple ways, even on the craziest nights, to work on preventive care for your kids’ heart health.

     
  • United Parent Support for Down syndrome volunteer Lisa Reninger talks to a woman during the Citizens’ Advisory Council and Elgin Area School District U-46’s third annual Special Needs Resource Fair last year at Elgin High School.

    U-46’s special needs fair offers parents resourcesFeb 20, 2014 12:00 AM
    Having a child with special needs entering school opens up many questions and concerns for parents. It’s an experience with which Melissa Owens and other parents with special needs children are intimately familiar. “You have to know where to look,” Owens said. “There’s certainly help out there ... it’s just where do you go for it.” That was the impetus for Owens and other U-46 parents to band together to start a Special Needs Parent Resource Fair.

     
  • Safety researchers expressed concern a decade ago that traffic accidents would increase as the nation’s aging population swelled the number of older drivers on the road. Now, they say they’ve been proven wrong. Today’s drivers aged 70 and older are less likely to be involved in crashes than previous generations.

    Accident rates improving for older driversFeb 20, 2014 12:00 AM
    Safety researchers expressed concern a decade ago that traffic accidents would increase as the nation’s aging population swelled the number of older drivers on the road. Now, they say they’ve been proved wrong. Today’s drivers aged 70 and older are less likely to be involved in crashes than previous generations, and less likely to be killed or seriously injured if they do crash, according to a study released Thursday by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.

     
  • If your child has seven or more bouts of recurring tonsillitis in a year, or five to six bouts each year for two years, national AAO-HNS guidelines issued in 2011 indicate tonsillectomy may be advised.

    What parents should know before ≠– and after – a tonsillectomyFeb 19, 2014 12:00 AM
    Today nearly half a million children under the age of 15 have their tonsils removed each year, making the procedure the second most common reason for care in children's hospitals. However, experts say the surgical procedure used to treat childhood sleep apnea and chronic, debilitating throat infections isn't necessarily a risk-free endeavor.

     
  • Dr. Henry Heimlich, who is known for developing the Heimlich maneuver that has been used to clear obstructions from the windpipes of choking victims around the world for four decades, has just released his memoir.

    94-year-old Heimlich maneuver namesake pens memoirFeb 19, 2014 12:00 AM
    The Cincinnati surgeon who wrote the book on saving choking victims through his namesake Heimlich maneuver has now penned a new book: his memoir. Dr. Henry Heimlich’s views on how the maneuver should be used and on other innovations he has created or proposed have put him at odds with some in the health field. But he hopes his recently published memoir will preserve the technique that has cleared obstructions from windpipes of choking victims around the world for four decades and made his name a household word.

     
  • Although the flu usually disproportionately affects the very old and the very young, this season 60 percent of those hospitalized for influenza have been age 18 to 64.

    H1N1 flu returnsFeb 19, 2014 12:00 AM
    The H1N1 virus responsible for the 2009 global pandemic is back. State health officials from across the country say the resurgence is resulting in a dramatic rise in flu deaths in young and middle-aged adults and in children this season.

     
  • NCH hosts fall risk screening clinicFeb 19, 2014 12:00 AM
    Northwest Community Healthcare (NCH) is hosting a no-charge fall risk screening clinic.

     
  • 1 million users view state health insurance websiteFeb 18, 2014 12:00 AM
    The website for Illinois’ health insurance marketplace has had 1 million unique visitors, Get Covered Illinois announced on Tuesday.

     
  • Third-graders Daaylin Bustos, left, Alejandro Guzman and Kassandra Bueno jump rope as part of Jump Rope for Heart on Tuesday at Mechanics Grove School in Mundelein. Students in third through fifth grades raised money for the American Heart Association.

    Mundelein students jump rope for heart, rubber ducksFeb 18, 2014 12:00 AM
    Mundelein third-graders jumped rope on one leg, in pairs, skipping and in threes during physical education class in an effort to raise money to fight heart disease on Tuesday. Students at Mechanics Grove School participated in Jump Rope for Heart to raise money for the American Heart Association.

     
  •  Dr. Esteban Lovato performs a routine check-up on a patient at the La Loma Medical Center in Oakland. The American Medical Association — the nation’s largest physicians’ group — is wary of online doctor review sites.

    BC-US-MED--Doctor Reviews, HFR,660Online MD reviews: cars, movie sites more popularHOLD FOR RELEASE UNTIL 4:00 P.M. EST. THIS STORY MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED, BROADCAST OR POSTED ONLINE BEFORE 4:00 P.M. EST. Feb 18, 2014 12:00 AM
    The 2012 survey may overestimate awareness among the general population, since about 1 in 5 Americans don’t have Internet access. But the researchers attempted to compensate for that by providing free Internet-connected computers for consumers without access.The results suggest that online doctor ratings have gained popularity since earlier surveys.

     
  • In this April 29, 1964 file photo, etiquette expert Cathy Bauby shows how puffing a cigarette like a steam engine shows that one is behind the “Jet Age” and doesn’t care how one looks, during a demonstration in New York. Fifty years on, health officials have begun to predict the end of cigarette smoking in America.

    Is the end of smoking in sight?Feb 17, 2014 12:00 AM
    Health officials have begun to predict the end of cigarette smoking in America.

     
  • A new diet suggests eating dark chocolate every day can help you lose weight.

    Your health: The Chocolate DietFeb 17, 2014 12:00 AM
    A new book says you can “Eat Chocolate, Lose Weight.” Dr. Will Clower, a neuroscientist, says eating chocolate can help you eat less all day.

     
  • Trans fats may soon be eliminated from all foodsFeb 17, 2014 12:00 AM
    Q: I see trans fats listed on food labels, and I’ve read that the FDA may ban them. Can you remind me what trans fats are, and why they’re bad for me?

     
  • Tourists walk through the snow-covered Empty Sky Memorial at Liberty State Park in Jersey City, N.J. in January. Researchers who analyzed local climate trends and hospital records on millions of Americans say there may be a link between weather and the risk for stroke. Cold weather, high humidity and big daily temperature swings brought more stroke hospitalizations.

    Stroke risk tied to cold, humidity, weather swingsFeb 17, 2014 12:00 AM
    There may be a link between weather and the risk of suffering a stroke, say researchers who analyzed climate trends and hospital records on millions of Americans. Cold weather, high humidity and big daily temperature swings seem to land more people in the hospital with strokes. As it got warmer, risk fell — 3 percent for every 5 degrees, the study found.

     
  • Noah Craten of Glendale, Ariz., is shown after surgery at Cardon Children’s Medical Center in Mesa, Ariz., in October. An infection in his bloodstream had caused abscesses on his brain. Tests by state health officials showed he had been infected with a strain of Salmonella Heidelberg.

    Salmonella outbreaks expose weaknesses in USDA oversightFeb 17, 2014 12:00 AM
    Some food-safety groups say the USDA should ban the most perilous salmonella strains from poultry altogether, just as it did with other dangerous bacterial strains in many beef products. Poultry processors have resisted such an approach, arguing that it would be expensive and ultimately futile, because salmonella is so pervasive.

     
  • Sometimes lifestyle changes are as effective as medicineFeb 17, 2014 12:00 AM
    You will often read that lifestyle changes are important for your health. However, in the traditional medical arena, lifestyle changes seem to take a back seat to medications. In a recent medical study, for most medical conditions regular exercise was as effective as medications.

     
  • Jacquie Tennant of Potomac, Md., 74, once a Holiday on Ice performer, practices at the Wheaton Regional Park rink in Wheaton, Md. She says the exercise helps keep her muscles strong.

    Who says 60 is too old to figure skate? Feb 17, 2014 12:00 AM
    For most people near age 50, ice is a source of peril, a sure fall and maybe even broken bones. The idea that someone approaching 60 and even past 70 could not just step on ice intentionally but do so in figure skates may sound crazy. And yet, older skaters are taking to thie ice. Of the 600 skaters expected to participate in U.S. Figure Skating’s adult championships in April, nearly 350 will be older than 40.

     
  • Melissa Palmer, who’s battling the rare Pompe disease, discusses her treatment with Dr. Richard McDonough, who diagnosed her as having the potentially fatal genetic condition. “He saved my life,” Palmer says.

    Inverness woman’s doctor helps her fight rare diseaseFeb 17, 2014 12:00 AM
    If not for the neck brace Melissa Palmer is wearing these days following a recent surgery to keep her spine straight, an outside observer might not know she was any different from any other suburban wife and mother. But what no one can see, and what not even she knew until few years ago, is that the 40-year-old Inverness woman has spent a lifetime battling a rare and potentially fatal genetic condition.

     
  • Women have a higher risk of blood clots that can cause strokes, heart attacks and other problems for 12 weeks after childbirth — twice as long as doctors have thought, new research finds.

    Blood clot risk lasts for 12 weeks after pregnancyFeb 16, 2014 12:00 AM
    Women have a higher risk of blood clots that can cause strokes, heart attacks and other problems for 12 weeks after childbirth — twice as long as doctors have thought, new research finds.

     
  • Tiny doses may help peanut-allergic kidsFeb 16, 2014 12:00 AM
    For some children, even trace amounts of peanuts can be deadly. But these kids have no options other than to avoid the legumes completely. The results of a new clinical trial may change that.

     
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