Articles filed under Constable, Burt

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  • Specialization not really key to kids’ sports success Jul 16, 2014 6:58 PM
    The days when kids played sports instead of organized sports is long gone. Now it seems that organized sports is becoming the singular organized sport for most young athletes.

     
  • U.S. president from Palatine, Cubs in the World Series? Jul 15, 2014 4:16 PM
    At the All-Star break, the last-place Cubs are a long way from the World Series. But in his new book, "Killing the Curse," author Dennis Hetzel, who grew up in the suburbs, tells of the Cubs playing for it all during a tense drama revolving around a U.S. president from Palatine and a Cubs fanatic from Streamwood.

     
  • Batavia woman epitomizes triumph over death Jul 13, 2014 6:01 AM
    A 57-year-old Batavia woman and heart transplant recipient is vying for a swimming medal today at the Transplant Games in Houston. “I was lying in a hospital bed near death, and look at me now,” she says. “It's such an amazing feeling as a nonathlete to walk in and walk around that stadium like real Olympic athletes do.”

     
  • Running with bulls annual reminder of suburban tragedy Jul 9, 2014 4:26 PM
    Every time I see news coverage of the bulls running through the streets of Pamplona, or see the annual spectacle mined for entertainment or comedy in a TV commercial, I think of Matthew Tassio. The Glen Ellyn native remains the only American to be killed during the running with the bulls.

     
  • Why we don't see lightning bugs in the suburbs Jul 8, 2014 8:30 AM
    Fireworks, legal and otherwise, lit up our skies for days. But one light is missing, and suburbanites probably share some of the blame. Spring floods, chemicals on yards and outdoor lighting make it tough for lightning bugs to show their stuff. “Chemicals put on the ground kill the lightning bug larvae living in the ground, and also kill the grubs and a lot of the things the lightning bugs eat,” says Jim Louderman of the Field Museum.

     
  • Anime Midwest in Rosemont home to the fantastical Jul 6, 2014 9:12 AM
    Almost 10,000 fans of Japanese animation convened in Rosemont this weekend for an event that features bizarre costumes, foam weapons, formal dances and plenty of free ramen. “I like dressing up,” says Abbi Witt, 15, of Cary, who's dressed as Harley Quinn, wife of the Joker in Batman comics.

     
  • World Cup fandom that's beyond rose-colored glasses Jul 1, 2014 4:56 AM
    The success and hopes for the U.S. team has Americans seeing the World Cup through new eyes this time around. But will any fans see matches through red-white-and-blue contact lenses? Online shoppers can buy USA lenses featuring some white stars on a blue background with a few red and white stripes for about 25 bucks.

     
  • Barrington swimmer helps others achieve dreams Jun 29, 2014 10:09 AM
    After coming close to swimming the English Channel, Barrington's Don Macdonald had to scale back his goals due to a nearly fatal heart ailment. Instead, he merely kayaked around Manhattan Island on Saturday.

     
  • Gambling U.S. soccer fans put money where mouth is Jun 26, 2014 5:30 AM
    You know soccer is making gains in the United States when gamblers treat a World Cup match as if it were a NBA playoff game. Vegas is rooting for the U.S. team to advance but is praying for the team to stop short of winning the whole thing. “There have been lines,” says David Pemberton, director of specialty games for Caesars Entertainment, explaining how World Cup gamblers flock to the betting windows a half-hour before each match. “There is a ton of action on the day.”

     
  • Foster kids finally find love, family with their two dads Jun 22, 2014 8:03 AM
    After bouncing from one traditional family foster home to another as wards of the state, Braiden and Michael finally found a permanent home with foster parents who adopted them. The kids celebrated Saturday as their dads got married. “Before I lived with my two dads, my life was horrible,” Braiden wrote in her journal. “I moved five times until my dad and daddy found me.”

     
  • When contest fails, friends come through for disabled Schaumburg child Jun 19, 2014 5:32 AM
    After their contest entry didn't win Jeff and Stacy Fulkerson a handicap-accessible van they need for their son, James, friends and loved ones organized a benefit. Wednesday, a new van arrived for James, who also is the 2014 face for the Epilepsy Warriors Foundation. “The Fulkersons are a wonderful family,” says Nikki Weiland, client relations manager for Mobility Works. “These families deserve any help they get.”

     
  • World Cup won’t be mocked among fans in Schaumburg Jun 17, 2014 5:21 AM
    In 1994, Burt Constable wrote a front-page column mocking the World Cup under the headline, "Does anybody care?" Twenty years later, not only is the World Cup a big deal in the suburbs, but he cares enough to get updates on Iran vs. Nigeria just to get me pumped up for that U.S. vs. Ghana match, for which fans cheered in Schaumburg.

     
  • Being a good dad may start with a Band-Aid, suburban father says Jun 16, 2014 10:09 AM
    Having researched, studied and practiced proven, long-term strategies in pursuit of molding better dads, fatherhood guru David Hirsch of Barrington still has a soft spot for the Band-Aid approach. “Carry a Band-Aid in your wallet,” says Hirsch.

     
  • For Goldman’s family, trial always more than O.J. ‘circus’ Jun 12, 2014 5:30 AM
    The riveting low-speed chase starring the white Bronco; the sensational cable TV news coverage; the trial spectacle; the birth of the Kardashians -- the O.J. Simpson case changed our world. But for the sister of victim Ron Goldman of Buffalo Grove, "it was just about my brother.”

     
  • How Hinsdale single mom’s food pantry visit led to college degree Jun 10, 2014 1:37 PM
    A single mom with two daughters, one with life-threatening disablities, Ellen Tucker went to a mobile food pantry in Hinsdale for help. She came home with a meal, a mentor and the help that led her to her college degree, grad school and plans for a career. “I’m in a much better place now than when I met them,” Tucker says of the people she connected with through that trip to the pantry.

     
  • Suburban women work to restore famous trotter Greyhound's glory Jun 8, 2014 8:10 AM
    A legendary horse during the Great Depression, the trotter Greyhound died in 1965 and was buried in St. Charles. Two local women, who want to make sure the horse gets his due, lovingly dismantled Greyhound's stall in Maple Park board by board so it could be rebuilt for a museum display. “It's a great story of true passion and dedication beyond the wonderful story of Greyhound,” says Janet T. Terhune, director of the museum.

     
  • Radio move from WGN fouls up 'Go, Cubs, Go' anthem Jun 4, 2014 5:47 PM
    Like all Cubs changes in my lifetime, the radio move from WGN to WBBM doesn't change the team's sorry record. It does, however, mess up they lyrics to my second-favorite Cubs song.

     
  • Graduations or playoff losses, end signals fresh start Jun 3, 2014 5:12 AM
    While we parents talk about graduations being bittersweet moments that surely will make us cry, it seems that few of us actually do. We don't have time to get too sentimental about the past because we are focused so much on the future. For many suburban graduates, commencement is merely the next step toward college, employment, military service or the life lesson that will follow high school.

     
  • Golf buddies aim to break 100 — at 103 and 98 Jun 1, 2014 6:45 AM
    The numbers on this golf course run together. The thermometer pushes 90. The scores approach 100. And the golfers soaking it all in are doing fine at ages 103 and 98. “Putters are good as canes, too,” says Dick Breeden, the 98-year-old, even if he doesn't need any help striding off the green at Arlington Lakes Golf Club in Arlington Heights after rolling in a 12-foot putt for a par. Veteran golfers get together every Tuesday and see if they can shoot their age. They are 103 and 98 years old.

     
  • Remembering Gina inspires suicide-prevention efforts May 29, 2014 4:48 PM
    This should have been a time of graduation parties for Gina Giancola of Arlington Heights. Instead, her family and friends work on Gina's Gallop, a day of running events in the girl's memory to raise money and awareness for suicide prevention.

     
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