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updated: 12/1/2017 6:39 PM

Nicor Gas shares home safety tips for winter weather

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  • As the weather gets colder and you're spending more time indoors, Nicor Gas is offering some safety tips for the home.

    As the weather gets colder and you're spending more time indoors, Nicor Gas is offering some safety tips for the home.
    Courtesy of Nicor Gas

 
Nicor Gas

When the days are shorter, more time is often spent indoors where heating, holiday decorations, winter storms and candles all contribute to increased risks during the winter months. Nearly half of home heating fires (49 percent) occur December through February, according to the National Fire Protection Association.

Nicor Gas wants to offer some winter safety tips for the home because ensuring the safety of every family we serve is our highest priority.

Winter safety

Heavy snow and ice may weigh down power lines and tree limbs, causing them to fall. If a natural gas meter is damaged or a gas line is exposed, immediately leave the area and call the 24-hour emergency response line, at (888) Nicor4U (888) 642-6748 from a safe location.

• Keep meters clear of snow and ice, and remove icicles that may drip water onto the meter.

• Use a broom to move snow away from the meter; avoid using a shovel or snowblower.

• Check outdoor vent openings and air intakes to ensure appliances are not obstructed by snow, ice or other debris.

• Customers should never use natural gas appliances, such as burners on a stove or ovens, to heat their homes or businesses.

Fire and carbon monoxide (CO) safety

Unlike natural gas' distinct odor, carbon monoxide is an odorless gas that is created when fuels such as gasoline, wood, coal, propane, methane or oil do not burn properly. In the home, heating and cooking equipment that burn fuel are potential sources of carbon monoxide, as are vehicles or generators running in an attached garage. If you smell natural gas or suspect carbon monoxide is present in your home or business, you should immediately leave the area and call 911 from a safe location.

• Make it a semiannual habit to change smoke and CO detector batteries. The Consumer Product Safety Commission recommends that consumers change the batteries when they change the clocks for daylight saving time.

• Install a CO detector near all bedrooms in the house; do not install a detector near your kitchen, garage or in a room with a furnace.

• Clean smoke detectors of dust and cobwebs to ensure proper function.

• Have a fire escape plan for your family in case of a fire. Walk through your home and inspect all possible exits and escape routes.

• Possible symptoms of CO poisoning include headache, dizziness, fatigue, nausea and vomiting; anyone experiencing these symptoms in the home or business are encourages to seek immediate medical attention.

Holiday safety

Holidays are a time for celebration with family and friends. Decorations make the occasion festive, and from parties to potlucks, food makes the event delicious. By following a few simple safety tips, you can enjoy time with your loved ones and keep yourself and your family safe.

• The leading cause of kitchen fires is unattended cooking, according to the NFPA. Prevent fires by making sure your oven and stovetop are clean and free of grease and dust, and stay in the kitchen while food is cooking.

• Lights are among some of the best parts of holiday decorating, but make sure there are no exposed or frayed wires, loose connections or rocket sockets. Use clips to hang lights, not nails, so cords do not get damaged.

• Ensure timers are turning interior and exterior lights on and off at appropriate times.

• Never leave a burning candle unattended, or sleep in a room with a lit candle. Make sure candles are placed on a stable surface and out of the way of small children.

• Shop during daylight hours if you can, and if it's dark out, park in a well-lit area and stay alert to your surroundings. Make sure all doors are locked and any packages or valuables are stowed in the trunk or placed out of sight.

• Don't advertise your travel plans, or when your home will be empty, on social media platforms; not everyone may be your friend on the networking sites. Ask a trusted neighbor, family member or friend to check in on your home while away.

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