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posted: 10/4/2017 3:21 PM

Donations help special need animals thrive

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  • Tootie is a small, female, brown tabby. She is quiet and a little shy, but doesn't mind being petted. She can be encouraged to come out to play and even take treats from the back of your hand. She gets along with everyone and with all of the other cats. If someone could spend a little more time with her, Tootie could easily become a very loving best friend.

    Tootie is a small, female, brown tabby. She is quiet and a little shy, but doesn't mind being petted. She can be encouraged to come out to play and even take treats from the back of your hand. She gets along with everyone and with all of the other cats. If someone could spend a little more time with her, Tootie could easily become a very loving best friend.
    Courtesy of The Buddy Foundation

  • Joy is a beautiful, brown tabby with green eyes. One look at Joy and you will want to cuddle with her. She loves humans, being brushed and all the attention she can get. Sit on the couch in her room and she will be the first to come over by you looking for attention. She just wants to be loved.

    Joy is a beautiful, brown tabby with green eyes. One look at Joy and you will want to cuddle with her. She loves humans, being brushed and all the attention she can get. Sit on the couch in her room and she will be the first to come over by you looking for attention. She just wants to be loved.
    Courtesy of The Buddy Foundation

 
By Mary Hayashi
The Buddy Foundation

From time to time, I try to highlight the special needs animals that Buddy cares for. The reality is, we may have more special needs animals than will ever find a home. That is because we have a difficult time saying no when an animal is in pain, but the problem is fixable. We would never want an animal to suffer.

Those of you who know us well know first hand for this to be true. Our felines and canines are given first-rate specialty care by the leading orthopedic, heart and eye veterinarians we can find. Do we pay for a second opinion? You bet we do.

That is why when we mail out a special needs flyer or a newsletter, we are not kidding, we need your help. That means volunteers, since it takes longer to care for our special needs animals. Even those of you who are already assisting us agree, all we take in are special.

Buddy runs 24/7, even if we are not open to the public. What we cannot accomplish with a volunteer force, we can with ongoing supplies and, yes, financial aid.

On our most recent flyer, we introduced you to a red, petite, blind tuxedo named Aurora. That short introduction did not begin to scratch the surface on how she was rescued, what her medical care has been to date, and what her future medical care sill consist of.

Let me begin with her rescue from certain death. She had a home for three or four years until her owners decided to move.

A curious neighbor asked how they were going to set up a new place for Aurora since she was blind. The response she received was, "Don't worry about her, we are not taking her with ... tomorrow we are taking her to put her down. No one would want a blind cat anyway."

The neighbor told us the owners knew they were moving for months, but made no inquiry because they really believed Aurora was disposable.

The concerned neighbor called up and asked us if we would welcome Aurora. Of course, we said yes. When Aurora arrived at the shelter, she looked like a homeless discard.

When the neighbors came in with all of her supplies. I asked, "What is all this?" The response I received was, "They gave us all of her belongings, because it was going curbside anyway." At that moment, this rare, red girl broke my heart.

Aurora went to the specialty eye clinic the first week she was with us. At this point we had two options: we could give her eye medications every day, as her eye sores and infections would be ongoing her entire life, causing constant pain, or we could have her eyes removed with the lids temporally stitched. With those two diagnosis, we opted to see a second veterinarian.

After all options were considered, the veterinary consensus was to remove Aurora's eyes. We are happy to report that she came through the surgery without any problems and is recovering in foster care.

Her needs may be ongoing, and Buddy will be paying for her future care. So when you receive our flyer with Aurora's photo on the front, I hope you will send Buddy a donation.

Your donation for Aurora's continued care means abandoned animals like her really matter and are worth saving.

Upcoming

From 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 28, Buddy will host a photo event with Wanda the Witch. Photos will be $8 and printed while you wait. Bring your entire family in costume. We will have treats, a bake sale and a prize for best costume. Proceeds from the event will benefit Buddy's animals.

• The Buddy Foundation, 65 W. Seegers Road, Arlington Heights, is a nonprofit 501(c) 3 shelter. Call (847) 290-5806 or visit www.thebuddyfoundation.org.

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