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updated: 9/19/2017 6:09 AM

An easy omelet for dinner, made sweeter with figs

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  • The combination of a not-too-sweet fruit, a pungent and melty cheese, soft egg with crisped edges and peppery greens makes these omelets a terrific option for brunch as well as dinner.

    The combination of a not-too-sweet fruit, a pungent and melty cheese, soft egg with crisped edges and peppery greens makes these omelets a terrific option for brunch as well as dinner.
    John McDonnell for The Washington Post

 
By Bonnie S. Benwick
The Washington Post

My neighbors' offer of plump, purple-blush figs from their tree sent me searching for savory ways to use them. Devotees of the lush fruit know its late-summer/early-fall season is upon us, and they can mobilize faster than a pack of ravenous squirrels when a basketful is within reach.

This recipe allows us to enjoy them two ways: fresh and jammy. Quartered and tossed with arugula, olive oil and a splash of lime juice, the fresh figs counterbalance the peppery green salad that goes on top. Paired with a pungent Brie, the jam makes the kind of instant omelet filling you can appreciate on a weeknight -- or for a weekend brunch.

The sweet omelet might be new to you; try it, and you'll partake in culinary tradition. French, Russian and Japanese versions typically add a bit of sugar to beaten eggs or sprinkle it over the finished dish. The marmalade-filled omelet in Germany, Austria and England could be served for dessert or as part of a grand, multicourse meal. And an omelet recipe with jelly, jam or marmalade filling appeared in Fannie Merritt Farmer's "Boston Cooking-School Cook Book" in 1896.

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