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posted: 6/13/2017 6:00 AM

Variations on the deviled egg

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  • Why choose between them? Make a sampler for your next get-together. From left to right: Horseradish Deviled Eggs (in back); Lourdes's Deviled Eggs With Foie Gras and Tuna; Proof's Beet-Pickled Deviled Eggs; Less-Devilish Eggs; Homestead Deviled Eggs and Hummus Deviled Eggs.

    Why choose between them? Make a sampler for your next get-together. From left to right: Horseradish Deviled Eggs (in back); Lourdes's Deviled Eggs With Foie Gras and Tuna; Proof's Beet-Pickled Deviled Eggs; Less-Devilish Eggs; Homestead Deviled Eggs and Hummus Deviled Eggs.
    Jennifer Chase for/The Washington Post

 
Less-Devilish Eggs. Dill relish, shallot and Dijon go into the filling; the secret to this more healthful version of deviled eggs is replacing half the mayonnaise with nonfat Greek yogurt.
Less-Devilish Eggs. Dill relish, shallot and Dijon go into the filling; the secret to this more healthful version of deviled eggs is replacing half the mayonnaise with nonfat Greek yogurt. - Jennifer Chase for/The Washington Post

Less-Devilish Eggs

Dill relish, shallot and Dijon go into the filling; the secret to this more healthful version of deviled eggs is replacing half the mayonnaise with nonfat Greek yogurt.

12 large eggs, hard-cooked

¼ cup plain nonfat Greek yogurt

¼ cup low-fat mayonnaise

1 tablespoon minced shallot

1 tablespoon dill relish

2 teaspoons Dijon-style mustard

1 teaspoon white wine vinegar

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Aleppo pepper, for garnish

Cut the eggs in half lengthwise. Place the yolks in a food processor along with the yogurt, mayo, shallot, relish, mustard, vinegar, salt and black pepper; puree until smooth.

Make sure the egg white halves have no trace of cooked yolks. (You may wish to slice a thin layer off the bottoms of each one, for stability.)

Spoon or pipe about a tablespoon of the filling into each egg white half. Just before serving, sprinkle each one lightly with Aleppo pepper.

The eggs can be hard-cooked up to 1 week in advance; refrigerate in an airtight container and let the egg white halves come to a cool room temperature before serving. The filling can be prepared a day in advance; store in a gallon-size zip-top bag (for potential piping). It's best to fill the eggs the same day they are served.

Serves 6 (makes 24 halves)

Nutrition | Per filled half: 45 calories, 3 g protein, 0 g carbohydrates, 3 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 95 mg cholesterol, 80 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 0 g sugar

Adapted from "Eating Well Quick + Clean: 100 Easy Recipes for Better Meals Every Day," by the editors of Eating Well magazine (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, 2017).

Lourdes's Deviled Eggs With Foie Gras and Tuna. They are named for an aunt of New York chef Alex Raij, who owns Txikito, La Vara and El Quinto Pino restaurants in New York.
Lourdes's Deviled Eggs With Foie Gras and Tuna. They are named for an aunt of New York chef Alex Raij, who owns Txikito, La Vara and El Quinto Pino restaurants in New York. - Jennifer Chase for/The Washington Post

Lourdes's Deviled Eggs With Foie Gras and Tuna

With foie gras and oil-packed tuna in the mix, these surf-and-turf deviled eggs are deliciously over-the-top.

12 hard-cooked eggs

½ cup mayonnaise

1 tablespoon Dijon-style mustard

Fine sea salt

2 teaspoons black truffle sauce (optional)

4 ounces good-quality tuna packed in olive oil, drained and crumbled

3 tablespoons minced chives, plus more minced or cut chives for garnish

2 ounces canned foie gras terrine, at room temperature

Cut the eggs in half lengthwise. Separate the whites and yolks and make sure the egg white halves have no trace of cooked yolks; hold the whites in a bowl of cool water until ready to use. (You may wish to slice a thin layer off the bottoms of each one, for stability.)

Place the yolks in a food processor, along with the mayo, mustard and a pinch of salt. Puree until smooth. Add the black truffle sauce, if using, and pulse to incorporate.

Transfer the mixture to a mixing bowl. Fold in the tuna and chives.

Use a fork to mash the foie gras in a separate bowl, then add to the egg yolk mixture, stirring until it is lump-free. Taste and add more salt, as needed.

Spoon the filling into a piping bag or gallon-size zip-top bag. Seal and refrigerate for 1 hour.

Drain and pat the egg white halves dry. Pipe some filling into each one, then garnish with minced chives.

Serves 4 to 6 (makes 24 halves)

Nutrition | Per filled half: 90 calories, 5 g protein, 0 g carbohydrates, 8 g fat, 2 g saturated fat, 100 mg cholesterol, 115 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 0 g sugar

Adapted from "All About Eggs," by Rachel Khong and the editors of Lucky Peach magazine.

Horseradish Deviled Eggs are just a bit more tangy than your standard deviled eggs -- a nice change of pace.
Horseradish Deviled Eggs are just a bit more tangy than your standard deviled eggs -- a nice change of pace. - Jennifer Chase for/The Washington Post

Horseradish Deviled Eggs

12 hard-cooked eggs

¼ cup mayonnaise, preferably Duke's (may use low-fat)

2 tablespoons prepared white horseradish

½ teaspoon finely chopped fresh dill

1/8 teaspoon kosher salt, or more as needed

Dash freshly ground black pepper

Sweet paprika or Aleppo pepper, for garnish

Cut the eggs in half lengthwise. Separate the whites and yolks and make sure the egg white halves have no trace of cooked yolks. (You may wish to slice a thin layer off the bottoms of each one, for stability.)

Place the yolks in a mini-food processor, along with the mayo, horseradish, dill, salt and black pepper. Puree until smooth. Taste, and add more salt, as needed.

Transfer the filling to a piping bag or gallon-size zip-top bag. Fill each egg white half. Just before serving, sprinkle each one with the paprika or Aleppo pepper. The eggs can be hard-cooked up to 1 week in advance; refrigerate in an airtight container and let the egg white halves come to a cool room temperature before serving.

Serves 6 (makes 24 halves)

Nutrition | Per filled half: 50 calories, 3 g protein, 0 g carbohydrates, 5 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 95 mg cholesterol, 60 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 0 g sugar

Adapted from a recipe at TasteofHome.com.

Hummus Deviled Eggs take to a Middle Eastern treatment so well, this might become your new favorite way to enjoy them.
Hummus Deviled Eggs take to a Middle Eastern treatment so well, this might become your new favorite way to enjoy them. - Jennifer Chase for/The Washington Post

Hummus Deviled Eggs

12 hard-cooked eggs

½ cup homemade or store-bought hummus

2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

2 teaspoons extra-virgin olive oil

Water, as needed

2 tablespoons za'atar

Cut the eggs in half lengthwise. Separate the whites and yolks and make sure the egg white halves have no trace of cooked yolks. (You may wish to slice a thin layer off the bottoms of each one, for stability.)

Place the egg yolks in a mixing bowl, along with the hummus, lemon juice and oil. Mash with a fork or use an immersion (stick) blender to blend until creamy and smooth.

Just before serving, spread some za'atar on a small plate. Working with one egg white half at a time, invert into a small bowl of water, then transfer to the dish of za'atar, lightly pressing to coat the flat surface of the egg white half. Spoon or pipe a tablespoon of the filling into each egg white half. Sprinkle the filling with a little more za'atar.

The eggs can be cooked up to 1 week in advance; refrigerate in an airtight container. The filling can be refrigerated a day or two in advance.

Serves 6 (makes 24 halves)

Nutrition | Per filled half: 50 calories, 4 g protein, 1 g carbohydrates, 4 g fat, 1 g saturated fat, 95 mg cholesterol, 45 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 0 g sugar

Adapted from a recipe at TheLemonBowl.com.

Homestead Deviled Eggs introduce a shot of green to the plate with a zippy bed of asparagus-tarragon puree.
Homestead Deviled Eggs introduce a shot of green to the plate with a zippy bed of asparagus-tarragon puree. - Jennifer Chase for/The Washington Post

Homestead Deviled Eggs

At Homestead, a neighborhood restaurant in Washington, D.C., these eggs arrive seated on a zippy bed of asparagus-tarragon puree -- an easy and excellent way to introduce some green.

For the puree

12 asparagus stalks (woody ends trimmed), cut into 2-inch pieces

1 medium shallot, chopped

½ ounce tarragon leaves (¼ cup; from a 0.75-ounce hard shell pack or about 10 stems)

1 tablespoon tarragon vinegar or champagne vinegar

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, or as needed

1 teaspoon kosher salt

For the eggs

12 large eggs, hard-cooked

½ cup mayonnaise

1 teaspoon whole-grain mustard

1 teaspoon champagne vinegar, white wine vinegar or tarragon vinegar

½ teaspoon kosher salt

½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

2 dashes hot sauce, preferably Cholula brand

Spanish smoked paprika (pimenton), for garnish

Microgreens, for garnish (optional)

For the puree: Bring a saute pan of water to a boil over high heat. Fill a bowl with ice water.

Add the asparagus to the boiling water; cook/blanch for a minute or two, just until the vegetable pieces are a brighter green. Use a slotted spoon to immediately transfer to the ice-water bath to cool.

Drain and transfer to a food processor, along with the shallot, tarragon, vinegar and lemon juice. Puree until fairly smooth; stop just to taste, then, with the motor running, drizzle in just enough of the oil to smooth and reduce the acidity. Add the salt and puree until well blended. The yield is about 1¼ cups; transfer to an airtight container. Place plastic wrap directly on the surface, then seal with the container lid and refrigerate until ready to use (and up to 1 week).

For the eggs: Cut the eggs in half lengthwise. Place the yolks in a food processor, along with the mayo, mustard, vinegar, salt, pepper and hot sauce; puree until smooth.

Make sure the egg white halves have no trace of cooked yolks. (You may wish to slice a thin layer off the bottoms of each one, for stability.)

Spread the asparagus puree on individual small plates or a platter. Spoon or pipe about a tablespoon of the filling into each egg white half, arranging the deviled eggs atop the puree.

Just before serving, sprinkle each egg lightly with the smoked paprika and garnish with the microgreens, if using.

The eggs can be hard-cooked up to 1 week in advance; refrigerate in an airtight container. The filling can be prepared a day in advance; store in a gallon-size zip-top bag. It's best to fill the eggs the same day they are served.

Serves 4 to 6 (makes 24 halves)

Nutrition | Per filled half: 90 calories, 3 g protein, 1 g carbohydrates, 9 g fat, 2 g saturated fat, 95 mg cholesterol, 130 mg sodium, 0 g dietary fiber, 0 g sugar

From chef Marty Anklam of Homestead in Washington, D.C.

Beet-Pickled Deviled Eggs. Egg white halves and mustard seeds get pickling treatment here, to create a stunning display.
Beet-Pickled Deviled Eggs. Egg white halves and mustard seeds get pickling treatment here, to create a stunning display. - Jennifer Chase for/The Washington Post

Beet-Pickled Deviled Eggs

For the pickled mustard seeds

¾ cup water

¾ cup cider vinegar

4½ tablespoons sugar

1½ teaspoons kosher salt

Generous 2½ tablespoons honey

½ cup yellow and/or brown mustard seeds, blanched (see note)

For the egg pickling liquid

2 cups beet juice

2 cups cider vinegar

2 cups sugar

1 tablespoon kosher salt

For the eggs

12 hard-cooked eggs

1 tablespoon mayonnaise

1 tablespoon Dijon-style mustard

1 tablespoon sweet paprika

¼ teaspoon kosher salt

½ cup canola oil

¼ cup water

For the pickled mustard seeds: Combine the water, vinegar, sugar, salt and honey in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring until the sugar and salt have dissolved. Add the blanched mustard seeds and cook for 10 minutes. Let cool completely before transferring to an airtight container; refrigerate until ready to use.

For the egg pickling liquid: Combine the beet juice, vinegar, sugar and salt in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring until the sugar and salt have dissolved.

For the eggs: Cut the eggs in half lengthwise; reserve the yolks. Place the egg white halves (free of any yolk) in a stainless-steel bowl. Pour the pickling liquid over them, making sure they are submerged. Cover and refrigerate overnight.

Combine the egg yolks, mayo, mustard, paprika and salt in a food processor; puree until fairly smooth. With the motor running, add the oil and water in a slow, steady stream to form a creamy, almost pourable filling. Transfer to a gallon-size zip-top bag; seal, pressing out as much air as possible, and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes (and up to 1 day).

Drain the pickled egg white halves, inverted on paper towels. (They may feel a bit firmer than plain egg white halves. You may wish to slice a thin layer off the bottoms of each one, for stability.)

Pipe or spoon a tablespoon of the filling into each pickled egg white half. Top each one with some of the pickled mustard seeds. Serve right away.

Note: To blanch the mustard seeds, place them in a small fine-mesh strainer. Bring a small pot of water to a boil over high heat. Dunk the strainer into the water a total of 8 times, waiting at least 15 seconds before the next dunk. Drain completely.

Ingredients are too variable for a meaningful analysis.

12 servings (makes 24 halves)

From chef Austin Fausett at Proof restaurant in Washington, D.C.

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