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updated: 10/11/2017 2:33 PM

The Latest: Tribe calls Dakota Access ruling disappointing

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BISMARCK, N.D. -- The Latest on a federal judge's decision to allow the Dakota Access oil pipeline to continue operating while more environmental study is done (all times local):

3:35 p.m.

An attorney for the Standing Rock Sioux says a federal judge's decision allowing the Dakota Access pipeline to continue operating while more environmental study is done is "disappointing."

The $3.8 billion pipeline began moving oil from North Dakota to Illinois in June, but Judge James Boasberg ruled that month more assessment is needed on the project's impact on the tribe. He ruled Wednesday the pipeline can continue operating in the meantime.

Attorney Jan (yahn) Hasselman says Boasberg's earlier ruling made it clear the tribe wasn't properly considered when the pipeline was permitted. He says it shouldn't be allowed to continue operating while more study is done.

Hasselman says Boasberg's ruling isn't appealable. But the tribe and three others are still trying to shut down the pipeline through an ongoing federal lawsuit.

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2:30 p.m.

Energy industry officials are applauding a judge's decision to allow the Dakota Access pipeline to continue operating while more assessment is done on its impact on the Standing Rock Sioux.

The pipeline is moving nearly half of the daily oil production in North Dakota, the nation's second-leading producer. State Petroleum Council President Ron Ness says it's "a critical part of American energy infrastructure."

The $3.8 billion pipeline began moving oil from North Dakota to Illinois in June. U.S. District Judge James Boasberg ruled that month that more environmental study is needed. He ruled Wednesday that the pipeline can continue operating in the meantime.

Grow America's Infrastructure Now spokesman Craig Stevens says the pro-pipeline coalition of businesses, trade associations and labor groups is "heartened that we are one step closer to finality."

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1:15 p.m.

A judge has decided to allow the Dakota Access oil pipeline to continue operating while a study is completed assessing its environmental impact on an American Indian tribe.

The $3.8 billion pipeline built by Texas-based Energy Transfer Partners began moving oil from North Dakota to Illinois on June 1.

But U.S. District Judge James Boasberg ruled later that month that federal officials who permitted the project didn't adequately consider how an oil spill under Lake Oahe in the Dakotas might affect the Standing Rock Sioux. They're one of four tribes challenging the pipeline in court.

Boasberg on Wednesday ruled that the pipeline can continue operating while the additional environmental study he ordered is completed.

ETP and the government had argued against a shutdown.

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