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Images: Martin Luther King Jr.

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The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. would have turned 88 this year.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. would have turned 88 this year.
Associated Press/Oct. 24, 1966
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. acknowledges the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial for his "I Have a Dream" speech during the March on Washington on Aug. 28, 1963.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. acknowledges the crowd at the Lincoln Memorial for his "I Have a Dream" speech during the March on Washington on Aug. 28, 1963.
Associated Press
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses marchers during his "I Have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., head of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, addresses marchers during his "I Have a Dream" speech at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington.
Associated Press/Aug. 28, 1963
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivers the eulogy at a memorial service for the Rev. James Reeb on March 16, 1965, in Selma, Ala.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. delivers the eulogy at a memorial service for the Rev. James Reeb on March 16, 1965, in Selma, Ala.
Associated Press
The Rev. Martin Luther King, center, and a Chicago building janitor, Robert DeBose, left, exchange words on the eviction of two families from the building. DeBose contended the families were evicted for not paying rent. He said many of the building's problems were caused by people who refused to keep it clean.
The Rev. Martin Luther King, center, and a Chicago building janitor, Robert DeBose, left, exchange words on the eviction of two families from the building. DeBose contended the families were evicted for not paying rent. He said many of the building's problems were caused by people who refused to keep it clean.
Associated Press/Oct. 28, 1966
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. is welcomed with a kiss by his wife, Coretta, after leaving court in Montgomery, Ala. King was found guilty of conspiracy to boycott city buses in a campaign to desegregate the bus system, but a judge suspended his $500 fine pending appeal.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. is welcomed with a kiss by his wife, Coretta, after leaving court in Montgomery, Ala. King was found guilty of conspiracy to boycott city buses in a campaign to desegregate the bus system, but a judge suspended his $500 fine pending appeal.
Associated Press/March 22, 1956
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. walks between 7-year-old Eva Gracelemon and 10-year-old Aritha Willis as he escorts black schoolchildren to formerly all-white schools in Grenada, Miss.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. walks between 7-year-old Eva Gracelemon and 10-year-old Aritha Willis as he escorts black schoolchildren to formerly all-white schools in Grenada, Miss.
Associated Press/Sept. 20, 1966
During a news conference in Chicago on Sept. 15, 1966, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr, called the 10-point open housing agreement reached with Mayor Richard Daley and other civic, business and religious leaders "a one-round victory in a 15-round battle." King had named Chicago his first target in the North for racial equality the previous winter.
During a news conference in Chicago on Sept. 15, 1966, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr, called the 10-point open housing agreement reached with Mayor Richard Daley and other civic, business and religious leaders "a one-round victory in a 15-round battle." King had named Chicago his first target in the North for racial equality the previous winter.
Associated Press
The Rev. Ralph Abernathy, right, and Bishop Julian Smith flank the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., during a civil rights march in Memphis, Tenn.
The Rev. Ralph Abernathy, right, and Bishop Julian Smith flank the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., during a civil rights march in Memphis, Tenn.
Associated Press/March 28, 1968
Students listen to the Rev. Martin Luther King speak in front of the University of California administration building in Berkeley. King reiterated his stand for nonviolence and urged young people to support a peace bloc that would influence the 1968 elections.
Students listen to the Rev. Martin Luther King speak in front of the University of California administration building in Berkeley. King reiterated his stand for nonviolence and urged young people to support a peace bloc that would influence the 1968 elections.
Associated Press/May 17, 1967
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the Rev. Jesse Jackson in Chicago. King holds a Chicago Daily News paper with a headline that reads "City Seeks To Cut Marches.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the Rev. Jesse Jackson in Chicago. King holds a Chicago Daily News paper with a headline that reads "City Seeks To Cut Marches.
Associated Press/Aug. 19, 1966
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. addresses an impromptu news conference after a circuit court issued a temporary injunction restricting civil-rights marches in Chicago.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. addresses an impromptu news conference after a circuit court issued a temporary injunction restricting civil-rights marches in Chicago.
Associated Press/Aug. 19, 1966
Martin Luther King speaks at a news conference on Sept. 10, 1965, after talking with Ambassador Arthur Goldberg at the U.S. Mission to U.N. in New York.
Martin Luther King speaks at a news conference on Sept. 10, 1965, after talking with Ambassador Arthur Goldberg at the U.S. Mission to U.N. in New York.
Associated Press
The Rev. Martin Luther King on March 2, 1965.
The Rev. Martin Luther King on March 2, 1965.
Associated Press
The Rev. Martin Luther King addresses a crowd estimated at 70,000 at a civil-rights rally in Chicago's Soldier Field on June 21, 1964.
The Rev. Martin Luther King addresses a crowd estimated at 70,000 at a civil-rights rally in Chicago's Soldier Field on June 21, 1964.
Associated Press
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. speaks at a news conference at the Sheraton Atlantic Hotel in New York City on Nov. 6, 1964.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. speaks at a news conference at the Sheraton Atlantic Hotel in New York City on Nov. 6, 1964.
Associated Press
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1964.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1964.
Associated Press
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. tells a mass meeting in Birmingham that the "words and actions" of Alabama Gov. George Wallace were to blame for the deaths of four black girls in a church bombing.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. tells a mass meeting in Birmingham that the "words and actions" of Alabama Gov. George Wallace were to blame for the deaths of four black girls in a church bombing.
Associated Press/Sept. 17, 1963
Heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali and the Rev. Martin Luther King speak with reporters in Louisville, Ky. Ali was there for his court hearing to prevent his Army induction.
Heavyweight boxing champion Muhammad Ali and the Rev. Martin Luther King speak with reporters in Louisville, Ky. Ali was there for his court hearing to prevent his Army induction.
Associated Press/March 29, 1967
Dr. Benjamin Spock, left, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Monsignor Charles O. Rice link arms as they march in an anti-Vietnam War rally in New York's Central Park.
Dr. Benjamin Spock, left, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and Monsignor Charles O. Rice link arms as they march in an anti-Vietnam War rally in New York's Central Park.
Associated Press/April 15, 1967
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. displays his 1964 Nobel Peace Prize medal in Oslo, Norway. King was honored for promoting the principle of nonviolence in the civil-rights movement.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. displays his 1964 Nobel Peace Prize medal in Oslo, Norway. King was honored for promoting the principle of nonviolence in the civil-rights movement.
Associated Press
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. stands with other civil-rights leaders on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., a day before he was assassinated at approximately the same place. From left are Hosea Williams, Jesse Jackson, King and Ralph Abernathy.
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. stands with other civil-rights leaders on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, Tenn., a day before he was assassinated at approximately the same place. From left are Hosea Williams, Jesse Jackson, King and Ralph Abernathy.
Associated Press/April 3, 1968
Mourners crowd into the tiny chapel of a Memphis funeral home to view the body of slain civil-rights leader Martin Luther King.
Mourners crowd into the tiny chapel of a Memphis funeral home to view the body of slain civil-rights leader Martin Luther King.
Associated Press/April 5, 1968
Coretta Scott King and her four children view the body of her husband in Atlanta. The children are, from left, Yolanda, 12, Bernice, 5, Martin III, 11, and Dexter, 7. The civil rights leader was standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis when he was killed by a sniper on April 4, 1968. James Earl Ray pleaded guilty to the killing and was sentenced to 99 years in prison. He died in prison in 1998.
Coretta Scott King and her four children view the body of her husband in Atlanta. The children are, from left, Yolanda, 12, Bernice, 5, Martin III, 11, and Dexter, 7. The civil rights leader was standing on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis when he was killed by a sniper on April 4, 1968. James Earl Ray pleaded guilty to the killing and was sentenced to 99 years in prison. He died in prison in 1998.
Associated Press/April 7, 1968
The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., was dedicated in 2011.
The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial in Washington, D.C., was dedicated in 2011.
Associated Press
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