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updated: 8/13/2015 9:49 PM

Midlothian boy with cerebral palsy receives running stroller in Schaumburg

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  • Video: Freedom Chariot

  • Shaun Evans bumps fists Thursday with Alex Gorz, 12, of Midlothian, who has cerebral palsy and autism, after presenting him with a running stroller in Schaumburg. Evans is running 3,200 miles across 15 states while pushing his 9-year old son Shamus, who has cerebral palsy, in a running stroller to raise awareness for Ainsley's Angels. With them are Alex's parents, Tom and Angie.

      Shaun Evans bumps fists Thursday with Alex Gorz, 12, of Midlothian, who has cerebral palsy and autism, after presenting him with a running stroller in Schaumburg. Evans is running 3,200 miles across 15 states while pushing his 9-year old son Shamus, who has cerebral palsy, in a running stroller to raise awareness for Ainsley's Angels. With them are Alex's parents, Tom and Angie.
    Joe Lewnard | Staff Photographer

  • Shaun Evans, pushes Alex Gorz, 12, of Midlothian, who has cerebral palsy and autism, on a trial spin in a running stroller, which he terms a "freedom chariot." Evans stopped in Schaumburg on Thursday during a 3,200-mile run across 15 states while pushing his 9-year old son Shamus, who has cerebral palsy, in a running stroller.

      Shaun Evans, pushes Alex Gorz, 12, of Midlothian, who has cerebral palsy and autism, on a trial spin in a running stroller, which he terms a "freedom chariot." Evans stopped in Schaumburg on Thursday during a 3,200-mile run across 15 states while pushing his 9-year old son Shamus, who has cerebral palsy, in a running stroller.
    Joe Lewnard | Staff Photographer

  • Shaun Evans, right, presents Alex Gorz, 12, of Midlothian with a running stroller that he terms a "freedom chariot" in Schaumburg Thursday. Evans is running 3,200 miles across 15 states while pushing his 9-year old son Shamus, who has cerebral palsy, in a running stroller to raise awareness for Ainsley's Angels. At left is Tom Gorz, Alex's dad.

      Shaun Evans, right, presents Alex Gorz, 12, of Midlothian with a running stroller that he terms a "freedom chariot" in Schaumburg Thursday. Evans is running 3,200 miles across 15 states while pushing his 9-year old son Shamus, who has cerebral palsy, in a running stroller to raise awareness for Ainsley's Angels. At left is Tom Gorz, Alex's dad.
    Joe Lewnard | Staff Photographer

  • Shaun Evans is running 3,200 miles across 15 states, pushing his 9-year old son Shamus, left, who has cerebral palsy, in a running stroller to raise awareness for Ainsley's Angels. In Schaumburg, near his halfway point in Chicago, he gave a "freedom chariot," his term for a running stroller, to Alex Gorz, 12, of Midlothian, right, who has cerebral palsy and autism. Standing behind them are Alex's parents, Tom and Angie.

      Shaun Evans is running 3,200 miles across 15 states, pushing his 9-year old son Shamus, left, who has cerebral palsy, in a running stroller to raise awareness for Ainsley's Angels. In Schaumburg, near his halfway point in Chicago, he gave a "freedom chariot," his term for a running stroller, to Alex Gorz, 12, of Midlothian, right, who has cerebral palsy and autism. Standing behind them are Alex's parents, Tom and Angie.
    Joe Lewnard | Staff Photographer

 
 

Schaumburg's Town Square became the meeting point Thursday between a father and son running from Seattle to New York City and a Midlothian boy and his parents who are among those benefiting from the awareness-raising effort.

Shaun Evans of upstate New York has been pushing a running stroller holding his 9-year-old son, Shamus, who has cerebral palsy, since their departure about 35 days ago.

Twelve-year-old Alex Gorz of Midlothian, who has both cerebral palsy and autism, received such a running stroller -- or as Shaun Evans calls it, a "freedom chariot" -- from the state-hopping father and son.

Alex was at the gazebo in Schaumburg's Town Square with his parents, Tom and Angie, to meet the Evanses, who were approaching the halfway point of their cross-country, 70-day run in Chicago.

The Evanses are raising awareness of the nonprofit Ainsley's Angels, from which they received their "freedom chariot" in 2013.

Shaun Evans refers to their summerlong endeavor as the "Power to Push" run.

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