Breaking News Bar
updated: 9/4/2014 9:36 AM

ECB surprises with rate cuts, new stimulus plan

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • The European Central Bank has cut its interest rates and announced a new stimulus program that involves buying financial assets, a bid to salvage a weak economic recovery. ECB President Mario Draghi said the bank would start purchases of private sector financial assets in October.

      The European Central Bank has cut its interest rates and announced a new stimulus program that involves buying financial assets, a bid to salvage a weak economic recovery. ECB President Mario Draghi said the bank would start purchases of private sector financial assets in October.
    Associated Press

 
By DAVID McHUGH
AP Business Writer

FRANKFURT, Germany -- The European Central Bank has cut its interest rates and announced a new stimulus program that involves buying financial assets, a bid to salvage a weak economic recovery.

In a press conference following a meeting Thursday, ECB President Mario Draghi said the bank would start purchases of private sector financial assets in October.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

The program aims to make credit cheaper, helping investment and growth at a time when the economy of the 18-country eurozone has stalled. The economy did not grow at all in the second quarter, raising fears of a triple-dip recession.

Some investors had been expecting the ECB to say it was preparing a new stimulus program, but most did not expect an announcement as early as this week.

"This surprising move does showcase how eager the ECB are to encourage banks to lend again," said Jameel Ahmad, chief market analyst for FXTM.

The new program is somewhat different from the stimulus program that the Federal Reserve has undertaken with some success -- large-scale purchases of government bonds.

But its announcement moved markets. The euro fell to $1.2995, its first time below $1.30 since July 2013. Bond yields across the eurozone also fell. The yield on France's ten-year bond fell 0.10 percentage points to 1.25 percent, while Greece's dropped 0.19 percentage points to 5.62 percent.

Earlier, the ECB also said it had trimmed its benchmark interest rate to 0.05 percent from a previous record low of 0.15 percent. The benchmark refinancing rate determines what banks pay the ECB for credit. It influences what banks charge businesses and consumers to borrow.

The ECB also cut its deposit rate -- what banks pay to keep their money at the central bank -- to minus 0.2 percent from minus 0.1 percent. The negative rate is an effort to push banks to lend money by imposing a financial penalty for hoarding it in the safety of the ECB's accounts.

Lower rates stimulate more lending and growth. However, lower rates become less effective as a stimulus tool as they approach zero. That is why the ECB also announced further measures to boost credit to businesses.

Draghi said the ECB's governing council was divided on whether to approve Thursday's new program. They had also discussed a program to buy government bonds, instead of the private sector investments.

"Some of our council members were in favor of doing more, and some were in favor of doing less," he said.

The ECB program will buy asset-backed securities and covered bonds.

Asset-backed securities are investments based on assets such as loans to companies and mortgages. Buying them would stimulate the market for such bonds and for banks to make the loans that make up the assets. Covered bonds are similar, but have additional rights for lenders.

To reflect the darkening of the outlook for the eurozone economy, the ECB cut its growth forecast for 2014 to 0.9 percent from 1.0 percent previously. It lowered its inflation forecast for the year to 0.6 percent from 0.7 percent.

Draghi said that despite the new measures, the ECB cannot save the economy by itself and needs help from governments.

"You need growth. You need employment. You need structural reforms," he said.

---

Pan Pylas in London contributed to this report.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.