Breaking News Bar
posted: 9/1/2014 7:00 AM

CDC: e-cigarettes more cause youths to smoke

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • Adolescents who use e-cigarettes are much more likely to smoke conventional cigarettes, according to a study released Monday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

      Adolescents who use e-cigarettes are much more likely to smoke conventional cigarettes, according to a study released Monday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
    George LeClaire/Daily Herald, November 2013

 
By Lenny Bernstein

Adolescents who use e-cigarettes are much more likely to smoke conventional cigarettes, according to a study released Monday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The results show that 43.9 percent of sixth- through 12th-graders who had used e-cigarettes said they intended to light up tobacco cigarettes over the next year, compared with 21.5 percent who had never used the electronic nicotine delivery systems.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

Overall, more than 263,000 adolescents who had never smoked before used e-cigarettes in 2013, up from 79,000 in 2011, the CDC reported in a study in the journal Nicotine and Tobacco Research. The data comes from the agency's National Youth Tobacco Surveys for 2011-2013.

The study also showed that 21.9 percent of the youths who had never smoked traditional cigarettes intended to try them in the next year but that, overall, the percentage who reported an intention to smoke declined "significantly" in the 2013 survey.

There is debate about whether e-cigarettes promote cigarette use or can help prevent it by offering people access to nicotine-laced vapor without the harmful chemicals in tobacco smoke. Others say that e-cigarettes may help wean smokers off tobacco.

In April, the Food and Drug Administration announced plans to regulate e-cigarettes, which came to the United States in 2006.

A study in the Lancet in November 2013 concluded that "E-cigarettes, with or without nicotine, were modestly effective at helping smokers to quit, with similar achievement of abstinence as with nicotine patches, and few adverse events."

Sally Satel, a resident scholar at the American Enterprise Institute and a psychiatrist who specializes in addiction, even argued that promoting e-cigarettes should be a "public health priority," free of taxes and with easily accessible starter kits.

The CDC, however, is "very concerned about nicotine use among our youth, regardless of whether it comes from conventional cigarettes, e-cigarettes or other tobacco products," Tim McAfee, director of the agency's Office on Smoking and Health, said in a news release.

With e-cigarette companies marketing heavily to young people and 80 percent of cigarette smokers starting the habit by age 18, the CDC considers intervening with this age group critical.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.