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Images: James Brady, 1940 - 2014

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  • Former Reagan Press Secretary James Brady gives Clinton s gun-control record a poignant thumbs-up Monday night, Aug. 26, 1996 onstage at the Democratic National Convention Chicago's United Center in front of a video image of his wife, Sarah Brady. Democrats opened their 42nd national convention Monday with a forceful anti-crime message that echoed from President Clinton s campaign train to the festive hall. The appearance by former Republicans James and Sarah Brady provided a powerful punch to opening night of a convention designed to make the Democrats case for another term in the White House and a return to power in Congress. Woman is unidentified.

      Former Reagan Press Secretary James Brady gives Clinton s gun-control record a poignant thumbs-up Monday night, Aug. 26, 1996 onstage at the Democratic National Convention Chicago's United Center in front of a video image of his wife, Sarah Brady. Democrats opened their 42nd national convention Monday with a forceful anti-crime message that echoed from President Clinton s campaign train to the festive hall. The appearance by former Republicans James and Sarah Brady provided a powerful punch to opening night of a convention designed to make the Democrats case for another term in the White House and a return to power in Congress. Woman is unidentified.
    Associated Press

  • President-elect Ronald Reagan, right, introduces James Brady as his press secretary in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Jan. 6, 1981.

      President-elect Ronald Reagan, right, introduces James Brady as his press secretary in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Jan. 6, 1981.
    Associated Press

  • U.S. President Ronald Reagan waves just before he is shot outside the Washington Hilton, Monday, March 30, 1981. From left are secret service agent Jerry Parr, in raincoat, who pushed Reagan into the limousine; Press Secretary James Brady, who was seriously wounded; Reagan; Michael Deaver, Reagan's aide; unidentified policeman; Washington policeman Thomas K. Delahanty, who was shot; and secret service agent Timothy J. McCarthy, who was shot in the stomach.

      U.S. President Ronald Reagan waves just before he is shot outside the Washington Hilton, Monday, March 30, 1981. From left are secret service agent Jerry Parr, in raincoat, who pushed Reagan into the limousine; Press Secretary James Brady, who was seriously wounded; Reagan; Michael Deaver, Reagan's aide; unidentified policeman; Washington policeman Thomas K. Delahanty, who was shot; and secret service agent Timothy J. McCarthy, who was shot in the stomach.
    Associated Press

  • A secret service agent brandishes a submachine gun while agents and police subdue a gunman behind him after he shot President Ronald Reagan, his press secretary, a policeman and a secret service agent in Washington on March 30, 1981. The policeman lies wounded, foreground, while a White House staff member kneels over James Brady, the press secretary.

      A secret service agent brandishes a submachine gun while agents and police subdue a gunman behind him after he shot President Ronald Reagan, his press secretary, a policeman and a secret service agent in Washington on March 30, 1981. The policeman lies wounded, foreground, while a White House staff member kneels over James Brady, the press secretary.
    Associated Press

  • In this March 30, 1981 file photo released by the White House, White House Press Secretary James Brady, face down at right, and Washington, D.C., police officer Thomas Delahanty, front, lie on the ground after being wounded during the assassination attempt on President Reagan as he was leaving the Washington Hilton, March 30, 1981.   A newly released Secret Service audiotape from the attempted assassination of Ronald Reagan sheds lights on the chaotic aftermath when neither the president nor his agents realized he'd been shot.

      In this March 30, 1981 file photo released by the White House, White House Press Secretary James Brady, face down at right, and Washington, D.C., police officer Thomas Delahanty, front, lie on the ground after being wounded during the assassination attempt on President Reagan as he was leaving the Washington Hilton, March 30, 1981. A newly released Secret Service audiotape from the attempted assassination of Ronald Reagan sheds lights on the chaotic aftermath when neither the president nor his agents realized he'd been shot.
    Associated Press

  • White House Press Secretary James Brady lies wounded on the sidewalk outside a Washington hotel after being shot during an assassination attempt on U.S. President Ronald Reagan, Monday, March 30, 1981. In the background secret service agents and police wrestle the alleged assailant to the ground.

      White House Press Secretary James Brady lies wounded on the sidewalk outside a Washington hotel after being shot during an assassination attempt on U.S. President Ronald Reagan, Monday, March 30, 1981. In the background secret service agents and police wrestle the alleged assailant to the ground.
    Associated Press

  • Secret Service agent Timothy J. McCarthy, foreground, Washington policeman, Thomas K. Delehanty, center, and presidential Press Secretary James Brady, background, lie wounded on a street outside a Washington hotel after shots were fired at U.S. President Reagan on March 30, 1981. McCarthy threw himself into the line of fire and Delehanty, on crowd control duty, was standing close to the gunman, John Warnock Hinckley, Jr., who pushed a pistol through a cluster of bystanders and fired six shots.

      Secret Service agent Timothy J. McCarthy, foreground, Washington policeman, Thomas K. Delehanty, center, and presidential Press Secretary James Brady, background, lie wounded on a street outside a Washington hotel after shots were fired at U.S. President Reagan on March 30, 1981. McCarthy threw himself into the line of fire and Delehanty, on crowd control duty, was standing close to the gunman, John Warnock Hinckley, Jr., who pushed a pistol through a cluster of bystanders and fired six shots.
    Associated Press

  • As a U.S. Secret Service agent with an automatic weapon watches over James Brady, the president's secretary, after being wounded in an attempt on the life of President Ronald Reagan, in Washington, D.C., March 30, 1981. A Washington, D.C. policeman, Thomas Delahanty, lies to the left after also being shot.

      As a U.S. Secret Service agent with an automatic weapon watches over James Brady, the president's secretary, after being wounded in an attempt on the life of President Ronald Reagan, in Washington, D.C., March 30, 1981. A Washington, D.C. policeman, Thomas Delahanty, lies to the left after also being shot.
    Associated Press

  • President-elect Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy wave after attending a luncheon in their honor on Saturday, Jan. 17, 1981 at the City Tavern Club in Washington. At right is press secretary Jim Brady and lady in back is Mrs. Holmes Tuttle, wife of Holmes Tuttle who boosted the luncheon.

      President-elect Ronald Reagan and his wife Nancy wave after attending a luncheon in their honor on Saturday, Jan. 17, 1981 at the City Tavern Club in Washington. At right is press secretary Jim Brady and lady in back is Mrs. Holmes Tuttle, wife of Holmes Tuttle who boosted the luncheon.
    Associated Press

  • James Brady, selected by president-elect Ronald Reagan to become his press secretary, talks to reporters after the announcement was made in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Jan. 6, 1981.

      James Brady, selected by president-elect Ronald Reagan to become his press secretary, talks to reporters after the announcement was made in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Jan. 6, 1981.
    Associated Press

  • This March 30, 2011 file photo shows former White House Press Secretary James Brady who was left paralyzed in the Reagan assassination attempt during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington marking the 30th anniversary of the shooting. A Brady family spokeswoman says Brady has died at 73.

      This March 30, 2011 file photo shows former White House Press Secretary James Brady who was left paralyzed in the Reagan assassination attempt during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington marking the 30th anniversary of the shooting. A Brady family spokeswoman says Brady has died at 73.
    Associated Press

  • This Feb. 11, 2000 file photo shows former White House press secretary for President Reagan James Brady, left, in a group photo following a dedication ceremony for the new James S. Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House in Washington. From left are, Brady, presidential press secretaries Joe Lockhart (Clinton), Jerald terHorst (Ford), Larry Speakes (Reagan), Mike McCurry (Clinton) and Pierre Salinger (Kennedy). A Brady family spokeswoman says Brady has died at 73.

      This Feb. 11, 2000 file photo shows former White House press secretary for President Reagan James Brady, left, in a group photo following a dedication ceremony for the new James S. Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House in Washington. From left are, Brady, presidential press secretaries Joe Lockhart (Clinton), Jerald terHorst (Ford), Larry Speakes (Reagan), Mike McCurry (Clinton) and Pierre Salinger (Kennedy). A Brady family spokeswoman says Brady has died at 73.
    Associated Press

  • This March 30, 2011 file photo shows former White House Press Secretary James Brady, left, who was left paralyzed in the Reagan assassination attempt, looking at his wife Sarah Brady, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington marking the 30th anniversary of the shooting. A Brady family spokeswoman says Brady has died at 73.

      This March 30, 2011 file photo shows former White House Press Secretary James Brady, left, who was left paralyzed in the Reagan assassination attempt, looking at his wife Sarah Brady, during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington marking the 30th anniversary of the shooting. A Brady family spokeswoman says Brady has died at 73.
    Associated Press

  • President Ronald Reagan holds up Royal Doulton President's signature edition character jug that was presented to him on Tuesday, July 24, 1984 in Washington at the White House as White House Press Secretary James Brady looks on. The limited edition numbered pieces will sold for $500 each and the James S. Brady Presidential Foundation will be a major beneficiary of the sales.

      President Ronald Reagan holds up Royal Doulton President's signature edition character jug that was presented to him on Tuesday, July 24, 1984 in Washington at the White House as White House Press Secretary James Brady looks on. The limited edition numbered pieces will sold for $500 each and the James S. Brady Presidential Foundation will be a major beneficiary of the sales.
    Associated Press

  • U.S. President Bill Clinton shakes hands with James Brady in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 24, 1993 after the Senate leadership called the President via telephone, to him that the Brady gun bill had passed. Looking on from left are, Attorney General Janet Reno, Vice President Al Gore and Brady's wife Sarah.

      U.S. President Bill Clinton shakes hands with James Brady in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 24, 1993 after the Senate leadership called the President via telephone, to him that the Brady gun bill had passed. Looking on from left are, Attorney General Janet Reno, Vice President Al Gore and Brady's wife Sarah.
    Associated Press

  • James Brady looks on as President Bill Clinton signs the Brady Bill in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 30, 1993. The President signed the bill, named after Brady a former White House press secretary, which would require a five-day waiting period and background check on handgun buyers and will take effect in 90 days.

      James Brady looks on as President Bill Clinton signs the Brady Bill in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, Nov. 30, 1993. The President signed the bill, named after Brady a former White House press secretary, which would require a five-day waiting period and background check on handgun buyers and will take effect in 90 days.
    Associated Press

  • Former Reagan Press Secretary James Brady gives Clinton s gun-control record a poignant thumbs-up Monday night, Aug. 26, 1996 on the opening night of the Democratic National Convention at Chicago's United Center. Democrats opened their 42nd national convention Monday with a forceful anti-crime message that echoed from President Clinton s campaign train to the festive hall. The appearance by former Republicans James and Sarah Brady provided a powerful punch to opening night of a convention designed to make the Democrats case for another term in the White House and a return to power in Congress.

      Former Reagan Press Secretary James Brady gives Clinton s gun-control record a poignant thumbs-up Monday night, Aug. 26, 1996 on the opening night of the Democratic National Convention at Chicago's United Center. Democrats opened their 42nd national convention Monday with a forceful anti-crime message that echoed from President Clinton s campaign train to the festive hall. The appearance by former Republicans James and Sarah Brady provided a powerful punch to opening night of a convention designed to make the Democrats case for another term in the White House and a return to power in Congress.
    Associated Press

  • Former White House Press Secretary James Brady looks over some "Share a Smile Becky" dolls during a Washington news conference Wednesday, May 21, 1997, where Mattel introduced the new member of the Barbie doll family. Brady is wheelchair-bound after being wounded in an assassination attempt on former President Ronald Reagan.

      Former White House Press Secretary James Brady looks over some "Share a Smile Becky" dolls during a Washington news conference Wednesday, May 21, 1997, where Mattel introduced the new member of the Barbie doll family. Brady is wheelchair-bound after being wounded in an assassination attempt on former President Ronald Reagan.
    Associated Press

  • Sarah Brady, right, and her husband former White House Press Secretary James Brady during a news conference in Miami, Monday, Oct. 16, 2000. Sarah Brady announced Friday April 20, 2001 on the "Larry King Show" that she was battling lung cancer.

      Sarah Brady, right, and her husband former White House Press Secretary James Brady during a news conference in Miami, Monday, Oct. 16, 2000. Sarah Brady announced Friday April 20, 2001 on the "Larry King Show" that she was battling lung cancer.
    Associated Press

  • President Bill Clinton greeting James Brady, at the White House in Washington Tuesday, Feb. 28, 1995, during a ceremony marking the anniversary of the Brady handgun control law. The law, named after Brady, requires a five-day waiting period and background checks for handgun purchases.

      President Bill Clinton greeting James Brady, at the White House in Washington Tuesday, Feb. 28, 1995, during a ceremony marking the anniversary of the Brady handgun control law. The law, named after Brady, requires a five-day waiting period and background checks for handgun purchases.
    Associated Press

  • President Clinton gestures toward former White House Press Secretary James Brady in the Rose Garden of the White House Thursday Aug. 6,1998 where he called on Congress to extend the Brady gun law, which was named after Brady. The president said he would reject any bill that weakens law enforcement's ability to keep weapons out of the hands of criminals.

      President Clinton gestures toward former White House Press Secretary James Brady in the Rose Garden of the White House Thursday Aug. 6,1998 where he called on Congress to extend the Brady gun law, which was named after Brady. The president said he would reject any bill that weakens law enforcement's ability to keep weapons out of the hands of criminals.
    Associated Press

  • James S. Brady, the namesake of the 1994 Brady Bill that banned sale of certain assault weapons, listens to Los Angeles Police Chief William Bratton, right, as they urge the renewal of the assault weapons ban which is set to expire Monday, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2004. Brady, press secretary to President Ronald Reagan, survived a devastating head wound in the 1981 shooting attack on Reagan, and later became a champion of gun control with his wife Sarah. Police Chief Joe Polisar, of Garden Grove, Calif., the president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, stands at far left, joined by Atlanta's Police Chief Richard Pennington, second from left.

      James S. Brady, the namesake of the 1994 Brady Bill that banned sale of certain assault weapons, listens to Los Angeles Police Chief William Bratton, right, as they urge the renewal of the assault weapons ban which is set to expire Monday, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 8, 2004. Brady, press secretary to President Ronald Reagan, survived a devastating head wound in the 1981 shooting attack on Reagan, and later became a champion of gun control with his wife Sarah. Police Chief Joe Polisar, of Garden Grove, Calif., the president of the International Association of Chiefs of Police, stands at far left, joined by Atlanta's Police Chief Richard Pennington, second from left.
    Associated Press

  • President Bush, left, jokes with members of the press as he stands with current and past White House press secretaries: Tony Snow, center; James Brady, second right; and Ron Nessen, right; during the final press briefing before the press room's renovation Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2006 in Washington. Nessen was President Ford's press secretary, Brady was President Reagan's press secretary.

      President Bush, left, jokes with members of the press as he stands with current and past White House press secretaries: Tony Snow, center; James Brady, second right; and Ron Nessen, right; during the final press briefing before the press room's renovation Wednesday, Aug. 2, 2006 in Washington. Nessen was President Ford's press secretary, Brady was President Reagan's press secretary.
    Associated Press

  • Former White House Press Secretary James Brady and his wife Sarah, chairwoman of the anti-gun lobbying group Handgun Control, Inc. arrive onstage where they spoke at the opening session of the Democratic National Convention, Monday Aug. 26,1996 at the United Center in Chicago. Brady was shot during an assassination attempt on President Reagan in 1981.

      Former White House Press Secretary James Brady and his wife Sarah, chairwoman of the anti-gun lobbying group Handgun Control, Inc. arrive onstage where they spoke at the opening session of the Democratic National Convention, Monday Aug. 26,1996 at the United Center in Chicago. Brady was shot during an assassination attempt on President Reagan in 1981.
    Associated Press

  • Former Reagan Press Secretary James Brady speaks to delegates at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, as his wife, Sarah, stands by Monday night, Aug. 26, 1996, in the United Center. Brady was wounded in the assassination attempt against President Reagan.

      Former Reagan Press Secretary James Brady speaks to delegates at the Democratic National Convention in Chicago, as his wife, Sarah, stands by Monday night, Aug. 26, 1996, in the United Center. Brady was wounded in the assassination attempt against President Reagan.
    Associated Press

  • Former Reagan Press Secretary James Brady, right, shakes the hand of Democratic Senate candidate Bob Torricelli after endorsing Torricelli for U.S. Senate on the Statehouse steps in Trenton, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 22, 1996. Brady endorsed Torricelli because of his support of the Brady Gun Bill. Listening in behind are from left, Democratic State Chairman Tom Byrne, State Sen. John Adler, D-Camden, Sarah Brady, and Trenton Mayor Doug Palmer.

      Former Reagan Press Secretary James Brady, right, shakes the hand of Democratic Senate candidate Bob Torricelli after endorsing Torricelli for U.S. Senate on the Statehouse steps in Trenton, N.J., Tuesday, Oct. 22, 1996. Brady endorsed Torricelli because of his support of the Brady Gun Bill. Listening in behind are from left, Democratic State Chairman Tom Byrne, State Sen. John Adler, D-Camden, Sarah Brady, and Trenton Mayor Doug Palmer.
    Associated Press

  • James and Sarah Brady, center foreground, head for a news conference in front of the Supreme Court Friday, Feb. 28, 1997, in Washington, marking the third anniversary of the passage of the Brady Law for gun control.

      James and Sarah Brady, center foreground, head for a news conference in front of the Supreme Court Friday, Feb. 28, 1997, in Washington, marking the third anniversary of the passage of the Brady Law for gun control.
    Associated Press

  • Former White House Press Secretary James Brady holds a model of a gun trigger lock during a news conference on Capitol Hill Wednesday March 12, 1997, calling for legislation for child safety locks on all guns. The news conference was sponsored by the anti-gun lobbying group Handgun Control Inc., whose Chairwoman Sarah Brady, Jim's wife, is at right.

      Former White House Press Secretary James Brady holds a model of a gun trigger lock during a news conference on Capitol Hill Wednesday March 12, 1997, calling for legislation for child safety locks on all guns. The news conference was sponsored by the anti-gun lobbying group Handgun Control Inc., whose Chairwoman Sarah Brady, Jim's wife, is at right.
    Associated Press

  • Former President Reagan's press secretary, Jim Brady, looks at a prototype "childproofed" hand gun during a news conference at the Trenton, N.J., Statehouse Thursday, Sept. 24, 1998. Brady visited Trenton in support of proposed state legislation that would require gun manufacturers to sell guns that are ''childproofed.''

      Former President Reagan's press secretary, Jim Brady, looks at a prototype "childproofed" hand gun during a news conference at the Trenton, N.J., Statehouse Thursday, Sept. 24, 1998. Brady visited Trenton in support of proposed state legislation that would require gun manufacturers to sell guns that are ''childproofed.''
    Associated Press

  • Former White House Press Secretary James Brady, who was left paralyzed in the Reagan assassination attempt, second from left, shakes hands with Sen. Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J., after a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 30, 2011, on the 30th anniversary of the shooting. From left are, Rep. Carolyn McCarthy, D-N.Y., Brady, Brady's wife Sarah, and Lautenberg.

      Former White House Press Secretary James Brady, who was left paralyzed in the Reagan assassination attempt, second from left, shakes hands with Sen. Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J., after a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 30, 2011, on the 30th anniversary of the shooting. From left are, Rep. Carolyn McCarthy, D-N.Y., Brady, Brady's wife Sarah, and Lautenberg.
    Associated Press

  • Former White House Press Secretary James Brady, center, who was left paralyzed in the Reagan assassination attempt, gestures during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, march 30, 2011, marking the 30th anniversary of the shooting. From left are, Sen. Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J., Brady Campaign President Paul Helmke, Brady, and his wife Sarah Brady.

      Former White House Press Secretary James Brady, center, who was left paralyzed in the Reagan assassination attempt, gestures during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, march 30, 2011, marking the 30th anniversary of the shooting. From left are, Sen. Frank Lautenberg, D-N.J., Brady Campaign President Paul Helmke, Brady, and his wife Sarah Brady.
    Associated Press

  • Former White House Press Secretary James Brady, who was left paralyzed in the Reagan assassination attempt, wipes his eye during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 30, 2011, marking the 30th anniversary of the shooting.

      Former White House Press Secretary James Brady, who was left paralyzed in the Reagan assassination attempt, wipes his eye during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 30, 2011, marking the 30th anniversary of the shooting.
    Associated Press

  • James Brady, the press secretary for President Ronald Reagan visits the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room on the 30th anniversary of the assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan, Wednesday, March 30, 2011.

      James Brady, the press secretary for President Ronald Reagan visits the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room on the 30th anniversary of the assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan, Wednesday, March 30, 2011.
    Associated Press

 

James Brady, the White House press secretary gravely wounded during the 1981 assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan, died Monday, his family announced. Brady was 73. Brady, an Illinois native and University of Illinois graduate, undertook a personal crusade for gun control after suffering the devastating bullet wound to his head.

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