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updated: 7/31/2014 12:26 PM

Mayfly madness on the upper Mississippi

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  • This July 20, 2014 photo provided by the National Weather Service in LaCrosse, Wis., shows a massive swarm of mayflies captured on radar as they emerge from the Mississippi River and drift north with the wind. A NOAA spokesman says they know the images show insects when the swarm appears over the river with no warning, but they don't know what kind of bug it is until people start calling _ mayflies in this case.

      This July 20, 2014 photo provided by the National Weather Service in LaCrosse, Wis., shows a massive swarm of mayflies captured on radar as they emerge from the Mississippi River and drift north with the wind. A NOAA spokesman says they know the images show insects when the swarm appears over the river with no warning, but they don't know what kind of bug it is until people start calling _ mayflies in this case.
    Associated press/National Weather Service

 
 

There are some areas in the upper and lower Midwest where the hatches of large mayflies is to fly fishermen what a filet mignon is to steak connoisseurs.

Mayfly hatches nearing biblical proportions on the upper Mississippi River in portions of Wisconsin are nothing new. But when something like the following happens, it's like a fire drill.

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The emergence of millions of freshly hatched mayflies has resulted in car crashes on bug-slickened roadways, and caused bow echos on National Weather Service Radar, which normally occurs only during severe thunderstorms.

For some amazing photos of the swarm, visit http://tinyurl.com/pj5blfa.

Protection theft:

We have some of these around here in the northwest suburbs, and police urge residents to keep away. But a warning like that apparently is not enough for some people in Pennsylvania.

A $40 artificial coyote placed at Cardinal Park in Latrobe, PA, to prevent the prolific poop from resident Canada geese from fouling the area around a new boat launch area lasted only a few days before someone pilfered the plastic predator.

"That didn't work. We need a dog," Jeanne Ashley, executive director of Latrobe-Unity Parks and Recreation, told commission members, according to a report a Triblive.com.

Fishing report:

We needed the rain but could do without the heavy winds.

The storm-like winds from the west dampened the Lake Michigan perching a bit, as well as salmon trolling. But by the weekend much of the Lake Michigan angling should be improved.

Fox Chain walleyes could surprise some fishermen on Pistakee when crankbaits are trolled across 8-foot breaklines. Excellent bluegill fishing on Petite Lake. Bluff Lake is seeing a resurgence of muskie action, while Lake Catherine has largemouth bass and muskie activity right over weed tops in 6 feet of water.

Busse Lake continues to be a decent panfish location in late afternoon hours.

• Contact Mike Jackson at angler88@comcast.net, and catch his radio show 6-7 a.m. Sundays on WSBC 1240-AM.

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