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posted: 6/14/2014 8:55 AM

Taxi drivers fed up with Uber

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  • A user scans for an available vehicle using the Uber Technologies Inc.'s app on an Apple Inc. iPhone 5 smartphone in this arranged photograph in London, U.K., on Friday, May 30, 2014. London's taxis are planning a 10,000-cab protest next month, as professional drivers across Europe demonstrate growing opposition to the Uber app.

      A user scans for an available vehicle using the Uber Technologies Inc.'s app on an Apple Inc. iPhone 5 smartphone in this arranged photograph in London, U.K., on Friday, May 30, 2014. London's taxis are planning a 10,000-cab protest next month, as professional drivers across Europe demonstrate growing opposition to the Uber app.
    Bloomberg News

  • A pedestrian, right, walks past a line of London taxi cabs parked along The Mall, leading away from Buckingham Palace, during a protest against Uber Technologies Inc.'s car sharing service in London, U.K., on Wednesday, June 11, 2014. Traffic snarled in parts of Madrid and Paris, with a total of more than 30,000 taxi and limo drivers from London to Berlin blocking tourist centers and shopping districts.

      A pedestrian, right, walks past a line of London taxi cabs parked along The Mall, leading away from Buckingham Palace, during a protest against Uber Technologies Inc.'s car sharing service in London, U.K., on Wednesday, June 11, 2014. Traffic snarled in parts of Madrid and Paris, with a total of more than 30,000 taxi and limo drivers from London to Berlin blocking tourist centers and shopping districts.
    Bloomberg News

  • Demonstrators fill a city highway as they protest against the Uber Technologies Inc. taxi app in central Madrid, Spain, on Wednesday, June 11, 2014. Uber, the car-sharing service that's rankling cabbies across the U.S., is fighting its biggest protest yet from European drivers who say the smartphone application threatens their livelihoods.

      Demonstrators fill a city highway as they protest against the Uber Technologies Inc. taxi app in central Madrid, Spain, on Wednesday, June 11, 2014. Uber, the car-sharing service that's rankling cabbies across the U.S., is fighting its biggest protest yet from European drivers who say the smartphone application threatens their livelihoods.
    Bloomberg News

  • A black London cab passes a poster advertising today's taxi demonstration against Uber Technologies Inc.'s car sharing service, at Waterloo station in London, U.K., on Wednesday, June 11, 2014. More than 30,000 taxi and limo drivers from London to Milan plan to cause traffic snarls in tourist centers and shopping districts, in protest against the unregulation of Uber's car-sharing service.

      A black London cab passes a poster advertising today's taxi demonstration against Uber Technologies Inc.'s car sharing service, at Waterloo station in London, U.K., on Wednesday, June 11, 2014. More than 30,000 taxi and limo drivers from London to Milan plan to cause traffic snarls in tourist centers and shopping districts, in protest against the unregulation of Uber's car-sharing service.
    Bloomberg News

 
Bloomberg News

It was 1937 when a sudden influx of drivers led authorities in Paris to set a quota of 14,000 taxi licenses. Seventy years later, the population of Paris has grown by 20-plus million but city authorities refuse to issue more than a few thousand new licenses, leading to one of the lowest cab-to-person ratios in major European cities and the lowest levels of consumer satisfaction. There's a reported 17-year wait-list for a license, which go for as much as 200,000 to 250,000 euros (about $271,000 to $338,600) on the secondary market. Drivers take on massive debt to enter the business; and it's not uncommon for them to work upward of 70 hours a week to pay off loans.

So it's perhaps no surprise that the cabbies of Paris are up in arms about the arrival of Uber, the car service app that's sweeping the world and recently completed a new round of funding that valued the company at $17 billion. This week, taxi drivers in at least six major European cities, including Paris, went on strike, blocking roads and causing all kinds of traffic mayhem to send a message to Uber. (Ironically, Travis Kalanick, Uber's CEO, started the company after he couldn't find a cab in Paris.)

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Though the traffic-making spectacle appears to be a new tactic, the capitalists at the Silicon Valley darling are facing criticism similar to what it has received in the United States: That the company is skirting laborious taxi regulation and must be stopped.

Uber bills itself not as a taxi service, but as a ride-sharing service that simply connects drivers and passengers. Although that distinction is up for debate, it is important because few nations have policies that explicitly bans such services. France, however, bans almost all private-hire cars, and in the United States, Virginia recently gave Uber a cease-and-desist letter until the state updates its policy.

Some cities are reforming their convoluted cab systems in face of the new competition. London's famous black cabs, for example, are being rolled into the app.

Paris, however, remains a monument to the worst kind of taxi-industry extremism. The city slapped minicab companies -- cars for hire that you can't hail on the street such as Easytake -- with arbitrary vehicle size specifications that disqualified their entire fleet and put them out of business in 2012. Uber cars have been attacked with rocks and had their tires slashed. Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy proposed adding thousands of new licenses while reformers suggest buying back all existing ones and deregulating the business. All reform plans and new legislation has been met with -- you guessed it -- taxi drivers blocking the streets.

Uber has now pushed into 37 countries, and with big money and buzz behind it, it seems unlikely that the company won't decisively break into the European market. In short: technology breeds disruption, so adapt and move on. But with the streets blocked, that won't be easy.

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