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updated: 4/9/2014 9:26 AM

New technology unwraps mummies' ancient mysteries

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  • The Mummy of Tamut, a temple singer around 900 BC. Scientists at the British Museum have used CT scans and volume graphics software to go beneath the bandages, revealing the skin, bones, internal organs, and in one case a brain-scooping rod left inside a skull by embalmers. The results are going on display in an exhibition which sets eight of the museum's mummies alongside detailed 3-D images of their insides.

      The Mummy of Tamut, a temple singer around 900 BC. Scientists at the British Museum have used CT scans and volume graphics software to go beneath the bandages, revealing the skin, bones, internal organs, and in one case a brain-scooping rod left inside a skull by embalmers. The results are going on display in an exhibition which sets eight of the museum's mummies alongside detailed 3-D images of their insides.
    Associated Press

  • Scientists at the British Museum have used CT scans and volume graphics software to go beneath the bandages, revealing the skin, bones, internal organs, and in one case a brain-scooping rod left inside a skull by embalmers. The results are going on display in an exhibition which sets eight of the museum's mummies alongside detailed 3-D images of their insides.

      Scientists at the British Museum have used CT scans and volume graphics software to go beneath the bandages, revealing the skin, bones, internal organs, and in one case a brain-scooping rod left inside a skull by embalmers. The results are going on display in an exhibition which sets eight of the museum's mummies alongside detailed 3-D images of their insides.
    Associated Press

 
Associated Press

LONDON -- The fascination with mummies never gets old. Now the British Museum is using new technology to unwrap their ancient mysteries.

Scientists have used CT scans and volume graphics software to go beneath the bandages, revealing skin, bones, internal organs -- and in one case a brain-scooping rod left inside a skull by embalmers.

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The findings are going on display in an exhibition which sets eight of the museum's mummies alongside detailed 3-D images of their insides.

Bio-archaeologist Daniel Antoine said Wednesday that the goal is "for them to be presented not as mummies but as human beings, and to be respected as such."

High-resolution scanning has revealed that one mummy, a temple singer named Tamut, had hardening of the arteries -- evidence of a fatty diet, and high social status.

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