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posted: 4/7/2014 5:00 AM

Your health: An apple not enough to keep doc away

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  • A new study suggests people who eat up to seven servings of fruit and vegetables a day can cut their risk of death by 42 percent.

      A new study suggests people who eat up to seven servings of fruit and vegetables a day can cut their risk of death by 42 percent.
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Eat 7 servings of fruit, veggies daily


You know the saying, "An apple a day keeps the doctor away"? Turns out eating one apple isn't enough, CNN reports.

A new study suggests people who eat up to seven servings of fruit and vegetables a day can cut their risk of death by 42 percent -- and that vegetables may be more important than fruit to your overall health. The study was conducted by scientists in the United Kingdom and was published online in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health.

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Avoiding your ex? Try this app


It is most people's worst nightmare -- bumping into an ex in a bar or restaurant.

However, a new app aims to solve the problem using the plethora of social networks that allow users to check into locations, the Daily Mail reports.

The split app can warn if an ex is nearby -- and give you the best route to get away.

The app was created by Udi Dagan. "Whether it's social, work-related, or family, it's rarely about disliking the person, and more about sparing ourselves (and them) those awkward, embarrassing situations that arise from the different types of relationships between people,' he said.

However, he admitted the app has annoyed many -- until they realize how it can be used.

Helping alcoholics for 75 years


First published in April 1939, Alcoholics Anonymous, the seminal text of the Alcoholics Anonymous Fellowship -- and the volume from which the movement takes its name -- will celebrate its 75th anniversary this month.

The brainchild of A.A. co-founders Bill W. and Dr. Bob S. and the first 100 or so alcoholics to get and to stay sober following its methods, the book sought to codify the progress of these early pioneers and to create a road map to lead other sufferers out of alcoholism's harsh wilderness, the group says.

Today approximately one million copies of the book are distributed each year in the English language alone (the book is currently translated into 70 languages), and A.A. membership has grown to more than two million with a presence in more than 170 countries. A commemorative version of the book is available in recognition of the anniversary. Visit aa.org for details.

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