Breaking News Bar
posted: 3/30/2014 6:29 AM

Toyota case shows it's hard to prosecute execs

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • Attorney General Eric Holder, right, listens as U.S. Attorney for the Second District Preet Bharara talks about the $1.2 billion settlement with Toyota over its disclosure of safety problems during a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington.

      Attorney General Eric Holder, right, listens as U.S. Attorney for the Second District Preet Bharara talks about the $1.2 billion settlement with Toyota over its disclosure of safety problems during a news conference at the Justice Department in Washington.
    Associated Press

 
Associated Press

WASHINGTON -- The Justice Department socked Toyota with a $1.2 billion penalty last week for concealing dangerous defects in some cars. Yet it's unlikely anyone will go to jail.

Prosecutors say they had little choice but to accept that outcome because of constraints with evidence and the challenge of gathering testimony and information from witnesses abroad.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

The same internal memos and public statements that buttressed the case against Toyota might well have been inadmissible as evidence against individuals. And it can be hard to prove that the person whose name is on a damning document was directly responsible for it.

The government says the penalty is the largest against an auto company. Still, some consumer advocates fear a monetary penalty doesn't do enough to dissuade executives at other companies from lawbreaking.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.
    help here