Breaking News Bar
updated: 3/20/2014 4:19 PM

Former Daily Herald VP, newspaper advertising giant Walsh dies

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • Jim Walsh Sr. accepts the Chairman's Award from Lynne Nicklas-Linowski on behalf of the Daily Herald at the Northwest Suburban Association of Commerce and Industry dinner in 1999. Walsh, who spent four decades in the newspaper industry and retired as a vice president at the Daily Herald, died Thursday. He was 76.

      Jim Walsh Sr. accepts the Chairman's Award from Lynne Nicklas-Linowski on behalf of the Daily Herald at the Northwest Suburban Association of Commerce and Industry dinner in 1999. Walsh, who spent four decades in the newspaper industry and retired as a vice president at the Daily Herald, died Thursday. He was 76.
    Daily Herald File Photo

  • Jim Walsh Sr.

      Jim Walsh Sr.

 
 

Jim Walsh Sr., a gregarious titan of the Chicago newspaper industry who evenly divided a 40-year advertising career between the Chicago Tribune and Daily Herald, died Thursday at the age of 76.

Walsh, who had been married to his high school sweetheart Nancy for 53 years, remained fit and active since their 1999 retirement to homes in Lake Geneva, Wis. and Sarasota, Fla.

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

The Daily Herald's former vice president of advertising was diagnosed with esophageal cancer only three weeks before his death, daughter Kelly Walsh said. Painless during most of its progression, the cancer only made its presence known when her father began having difficulty swallowing, she added.

The 6-foot 6-inch former Michigan State University basketball player had remained so healthy and strong into his 70s that he was able to join a physically grueling 2011 expedition to the jungles of Papua New Guinea to search for missing World War II fighter planes, Kelly Walsh said.

"He lived a very, very full life," she added. "He was a passionate reader and a World War II enthusiast. He believed in the 'Greatest Generation.'"

Walsh loved golfing and the company of the good friends he played with. He was a passionate sports fan, and one of his last pleasures was seeing his beloved Michigan State Spartans' win the Big 10 basketball title over the weekend.

Walsh had worked in advertising at the Chicago Tribune for 20 years before he moving over to the Daily Herald in 1980. His daughter said advertising was his passion.

"He cherished the work relationships that he had," she said. "He was a man who really enjoyed people."

The Daily Herald's Chairman Emeritus Daniel E. Baumann remembered how well Walsh transitioned into a new environment that seemed to suit him perfectly back in 1980.

"Jim came to us as a consummate salesman who moved easily into the role of a great leader and motivator for his staff," Baumann said. "He was a steady hand during turbulent times and a constant supporter of the paper who helped us move from a small suburban daily into a major force in the Chicago media scene. He was a wonderful father and family man and friend. Everyone who knew Jim loved him."

Daily Herald Chairman and Publisher Doug Ray remembered his time with Walsh as one that was transformative for the newspaper.

"Jim and I became corporate officers together in 1984, and I observed first hand his professionalism and commitment to the newspaper," Ray said. "He was the best known of any of us because of his outgoing personality and willingness to work long and hard on any number of initiatives in support of good causes. He served the newspaper and its readers and advertisers so well."

As important as his career and professional friendships were, Kelly Walsh said family was always his most important and proudest accomplishment. He had three sons and three daughters, and by the time of his passing had 11 grandchildren ranging in age from 23 years to one month.

"As big and as strong as he was, you couldn't find someone more gentle around children," Kelly Walsh said. "He loved to bounce children on his knee."

She said her mother, though resilient, is still struggling to adapt to a sudden loss of her lifelong love.

"My mom is about as strong as you can possibly imagine, and devastated as well," Kelly Walsh said.

Services for Walsh will take place back in his longtime hometown of Des Plaines. Visitation will be from 3 to 7 p.m. Thursday, March 27 at Oehler Funeral Home, 2099 Miner St., Des Plaines, with the funeral Mass to follow at 10 a.m. Friday, March 28 at St. Mary's Catholic Church, 794 Pearson St., Des Plaines.

Share this page
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.