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posted: 3/17/2014 5:30 AM

Your health: Are football helmets failing our kids?

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  • Recent research finds that football helmets, which have been designed largely to prevent skull fractures and brain contusions, aren't all that effective against concussion.

      Recent research finds that football helmets, which have been designed largely to prevent skull fractures and brain contusions, aren't all that effective against concussion.
    Associated Press File Photo

 

Are football helmets failing our kids?

A study to be presented at a meeting of the American Academy of Neurology next month compares 10 of the most widely used football helmets in drop tests designed to measure the kinds of forces that are most likely to result in concussion, reports the Los Angeles Times.

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The latest research finds that football helmets, which have been designed largely to prevent skull fractures and brain contusions, aren't all that effective against concussion, which happens when the brain bounces and twists around inside the skull.

"All of them were terrible," said Dr. Francis X. Conidi, who is to present the new research before the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting April 26 to May 3.

ADHD doesn't exist, a new book says

"ADHD Does Not Exist: The Truth About Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder" is a new book by Richard Saul.

"Not a single individual -- not even the person who finds it close to impossible to pay attention or sit still -- is afflicted by the disorder called ADHD as we define it today," Richard Saul writes in his new book, reports

A lot of doctors would disagree: There has been a 40 percent increase in ADHD diagnoses in the past decade, reports The Washington Post. Eleven percent of U.S. children have received that diagnosis, and most of them are prescribed stimulants such as Adderall or Ritalin.

"I wrote this book to be provocative," Saul says.

And he has probably succeeded.

Sleep machines may affect babies' hearing

White noise machines may help babies sleep more soundly, but they may also damage their delicate ears, a group of researchers warned, reports the New York Daily News.

Some brands of infant sleep machines -- which, like ambient noise machines for adults, emit a variety of soothing sounds designed to block out external noise -- are capable of playing at volumes that could impair an infant's hearing, says a study published March 3 in the journal Pediatrics.

"The (baby's) ear itself might be more susceptible to sound damage than an adult's ear," Dr. Blake Papsin told CBS News.

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