Breaking News Bar
updated: 3/12/2014 11:45 AM

Malaysian response to missing plane under scrutiny

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • Sand artist Sudarshan Pattnaik creates a sculpture depicting the missing Malaysia Airlines aircraft on the beach in Puri, India, Wednesday, March 12, 2014. Malaysia has asked for India's assistance in searching for the missing Boeing 777 jetliner to widen the search to an area near the Andaman Sea, an Indian official said Wednesday.

      Sand artist Sudarshan Pattnaik creates a sculpture depicting the missing Malaysia Airlines aircraft on the beach in Puri, India, Wednesday, March 12, 2014. Malaysia has asked for India's assistance in searching for the missing Boeing 777 jetliner to widen the search to an area near the Andaman Sea, an Indian official said Wednesday.
    Associated Press

 
Associated Press

Malaysian officials on Wednesday defended their handling of the search for Malaysia Airlines flight MH370. Here are some discrepancies in statements they have made since the plane disappeared early Saturday with 239 people on board:

• TIME OF DISAPPEARANCE

Order Reprint Print Article
 
Interested in reusing this article?
Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.
The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.
Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Success - request sent close

Malaysia Airlines initially said the Boeing 777 lost contact with air traffic control at 2:40 a.m. after about two hours in the air. It later said contact was lost at 1:30 a.m., as data on flight tracking websites had been showing. The incorrect time report led to speculation the flight had crashed somewhere between Vietnam and China.

• DID THE FLIGHT TURN BACK?

The government said on the day of the plane's disappearance that there were indications it attempted to turn back, but didn't say what they were. After days of confusion and suggestions authorities were looking in the wrong place, military officials explained Wednesday they had spotted images of what might be the plane on air defense radar recordings indicating it might have turned around, but they were inconclusive.

• MISSING PASSENGERS

Officials initially said four or five passengers had checked in for the flight but did not board, and their luggage had to be taken off the plane before it departed for Beijing. This fueled speculation that terrorism might have caused the crash. On Wednesday, officials said some people with reservations never checked in and were simply replaced by standby passengers, and no baggage was removed.

• STOLEN PASSPORTS

Malaysian Home Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi initially described two men who boarded the plane with stolen passports as having Asian features, which was contradicted a day later by the civil aviation chief, Azharuddin Abdul Rahman, who created confusion with remarks that could have been taken to indicate they were black. The men were later identified by Interpol as Iranian. Malaysian police released photos of the men with identical legs, which turned out to be digitally manipulated. Police said this was an oversight and was not done to mislead.

Share this page
  • This article filed under:
  • News
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.