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updated: 3/7/2014 9:27 PM

Three long years later, Dunn nearly done here

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  • Expected to be a left-handed force in the middle of the order after signing a four-year, $56 million contract following the 2010 season, Adam Dunn has instead become one of the most disappointing players in White Sox history.

      Expected to be a left-handed force in the middle of the order after signing a four-year, $56 million contract following the 2010 season, Adam Dunn has instead become one of the most disappointing players in White Sox history.
    Associated Press

 
 

In Friday's 4-3 Cactus League win over the Reds, Adam Dunn was 2-for-3 and drove in 2 runs.

Had this happened in the spring of 2011, White Sox fans would have undoubtedly been a little pumped up about Dunn's presence on the South Side.

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Three long years later, they know better.

Expected to be a left-handed force in the middle of the order after signing a four-year, $56 million contract following the 2010 season, Dunn has instead become one of the most disappointing players in franchise history.

The designated hitter batted a laughable .159 in his first year with the Sox, .204 in 2012 and .219 last year. A proven power hitter when he arrived, Dunn's averaged just 29 home runs and 75 RBI while striking out 588 times.

Fortunately for the White Sox -- and the fans that have been able to stomach the past three seasons -- Dunn is now in the final year of his contract.

If he somehow gets back to his old from, which is doubtful at the age of 34, there is a chance Dunn could be traded at some point during the upcoming season.

More likely, he'll remain on the Sox' roster and either try finding a new job next season or head into retirement.

With Jose Abreu on board as the White Sox' new first baseman, Dunn and Paul Konerko are likely to platoon at DH.

His numbers have been really bad since 2011, but Dunn's attitude has never been a problem. That remained the case when the Sox signed Abreu.

"Whatever it takes to win, I don't care," Dunn said. "The good news is there are no egos, especially with me and Paul. We talked about it when he was making his decision (to play one more year). Whatever is going to help us win that night, I know he's for it and I'm for it. That to me is a non-issue."

Dunn should be in the lineup against right-handed starters, with Konerko getting the nod against left-handers. Like Dunn, Konerko is up for the platoon role.

"There are going to be a lot of days this year where I don't play, or I play and don't do good that day, and the end results of the numbers might not be anything even close to what I've done since the playing time will be less," Konerko said. "That's totally different than in years past where when you're that four-hole hitter, you have to carry the team at times, you have to drive in runs, you have to be the guy. If you do the other things, great, but you know everything is hinging on you producing and putting up numbers. It's different now. I still want to do well, don't get me wrong, I want to help the team win."

Elsewhere on the bench, Alejandro De Aza gives the White Sox some left-handed pop after losing his starting job in center field to Adam Eaton.

Leury Garcia is the likely utility infielder, although Marcus Semien figures to be heard from at some point of the season.

Acquired from the Rangers last August in the Alex Rios trade, Garcia played 12 games at second base for the Sox, four at shortstop and four at third base, batting .204 with 1 RBI and 6 stolen bases.

As an added bonus, Garcia can also play center field.

Tyler Flowers and Josh Phegley remain the White Sox' two catchers, and they should split time on a fairly even basis.

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