Breaking News Bar
posted: 3/6/2014 1:01 AM

Emerald ash borer, flood relief project slated for Bartlett budget

hello
Success - Article sent! close
  • Bartlett's response to the emerald ash borer -- a beetle destructive to thousands of trees in town -- is partly behind spending growth in the village's proposed $57.5 million budget.

      Bartlett's response to the emerald ash borer -- a beetle destructive to thousands of trees in town -- is partly behind spending growth in the village's proposed $57.5 million budget.
    Daily Herald file photo

 
 

Spending in Bartlett is on the rise as the village replaces thousands of trees infested by the emerald ash borer.

The proposed 2014-15 budget is expected to climb to almost $57.5 million, representing a more than 2 percent increase over the last fiscal year.

The emerald ash borer -- a destructive beetle native to Asia -- continues to wreak havoc on trees across the suburbs. In Bartlett, the tiny bug has hit the village with big costs -- expected to reach a total of $1.3 million over four years.

The village's response to the pest is one of the major projects driving the spending growth, officials say.

Bartlett is heading into the second year of cutting down infected trees and replacing them with more diverse varieties. In the 2015 and 2016 fiscal years, the village plans to plant 2,000 trees.

"We've got a lot ahead of us," village Administrator Valerie Salmons said.

The budget also calls for sinking about $5 million into a long-awaited project designed to alleviate flooding on the village's north side. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is awarding a $3.8 million grant to reimburse the village for 75 percent of the project's cost.

Construction should begin in the fall in an area where homes sustained extensive flood damage in September 2008.

As for the revenue side, fees for village services account for a quarter of Bartlett's earnings.

Residents will see no fee hikes for water and sewer services, officials say. In the fall, the village also expects to reduce the property tax levy in a move reflected on the bills taxpayers receive in 2015.

The village's revenues have stabilized after the economic downturn. Officials anticipate sales tax dollars increasing 3 percent to about $2.1 million.

"We see some signs of recovery, but we're not quite there yet," Salmons said.

The village board will resume talks on the budget with an eye toward the public works and administrative departments March 18. Trustees will approve the blueprint by May 1.

Share

Interested in reusing this article?

Custom reprints are a powerful and strategic way to share your article with customers, employees and prospects.

The YGS Group provides digital and printed reprint services for Daily Herald. Complete the form to the right and a reprint consultant will contact you to discuss how you can reuse this article.

Need more information about reprints? Visit our Reprints Section for more details.

Contact information ( * required )

Name * Company Telephone * E-mail *

Message (optional)

Success - Reprint request sent Click to close
Comments ()
Guidelines: Keep it civil and on topic; no profanity, vulgarity, slurs or personal attacks. People who harass others or joke about tragedies will be blocked. If a comment violates these standards or our terms of service, click the X in the upper right corner of the comment box. To find our more, read our FAQ.
    help here